338 win mag, 300 win mag, or 300 weatherby mag?

banjo318

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Billings, MT
Well im going to rebarrel my 7mm remington magnum soon. So i need to decide on a longish (to 1000 yards) hunting rifle. I need to make a point that the 338 win mag is flatter shooting than the 7mm remington magnum and provides way more punch. Anyways, I have a 300 win mag and its wonderful for that, but the 300 weatherby is better. The 7 stw might be an option but i dont think ill choose that. This rifle will be used at 400 yards for the closests shots. It must be able to take down elk at 1000 yards. (must still have 1500 ft lbs of energy at 1000.)
 
Just to put this out there, the 339 win mag has a 200 ft pound of energy advantage over the 300 weatherby.
What bullets would that be comparing?
I could not get enough speed out of the 300gr/.338 to better the 210gr/.308 bullets.
Cliff
 
if your truely going to shoot elk at a 1000 yards, which by the way i personaly thnk is nuts, Id go for all the gun you can shoot. Id consider a 300 ultra or 338 ultra or a 340 wby
 
What bullets would that be comparing?
I could not get enough speed out of the 300gr/.338 to better the 210gr/.308 bullets.
Cliff

300 grain matchkings and 220 partitions. Of course this is not with the same powder, but its the best velocity i can get out of it.
 
I cant choose any of the large RUM's because of my bolt head. I don't want to pay even more to have a gunsmith change it to a rum bolt head.
 
338 rum, same bolt head as your 7mm, the gunsmith will however need to open up the rails in the action and install a ultra mag follower and magazine box. I changed my 338 win to a 300 rum (I already had a 338 rum)
 
If one's objective is to shoot bullets accurately and shot placement is paramount, then consider the cartridge that has the least recoil. Doesn't matter if a brake lessens it after the bullet leaves the muzzle; it still moves a lot while the bullet's going down the barrel.

Belted cases are not all that great for best accuracy when reloaded. Rimless bottleneck ones are much easier to reload to be a tack driver.

I consider the .300 RUM the ultimate compromise to have the best suite of accuracy, shootability and hunting performance at the longer ranges. It's worth opening up the bolt face.
 
I consider the .300 RUM the ultimate compromise to have the best suite of accuracy, shootability and hunting performance at the longer ranges. It's got the same case head and bolt face diameter of the 7mm Rem Mag; .532 inch.
If you take a look at Rich Sherman's (elkaholic) 30/375 S.I. i think you will change your mind.:D:Dgun)
 
If you take a look at Rich Sherman's (elkaholic) 30/375 S.I. i think you will change your mind.:D:Dgun)
I don't think so.

The difference in what they do with the same bullet's not worth having to reform cases before you can shoot them in my opinion. That subtracts from "shootability" which includes getting components and loading them.

I'd like to see the muzzle velocity difference between both cartridges with the same barrel length, peak pressure, bore and groove dimensions for heavy 30 caliber hunting bullets. This would be a realistic comparison. Even if the .30-.375 shot 'em 50 to 100 fps faster, that' enough to negatively effect "shootability." More muzzle velocity is countered by more recoil making the faster ones harder to shoot accurately.
 
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