Why go custom build?

Discussion in 'Rifles, Bullets, Barrels & Ballistics' started by engineer40, Aug 20, 2015.

  1. engineer40

    engineer40 Well-Known Member

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    I have yet to throw down the loot on a custom build. But I have a couple rifles that will shoot 1 hole groups at 100 yards now. I've been trying to talk myself into having a custom rifle built, but it's hard to justify it logically when I can get factory stuff to shoot well most of the time.

    (Maybe this is a time I should listen to my wife and be more in touch with my emotional side and not be so logical) :D

    Is this a case like a Ford Taurus vs an Audi A6? If you compare on paper, cars can be very similar sometimes... But you won't know the real differences until you drive one.

    Thanks!
     
  2. ohiohunter

    ohiohunter Well-Known Member

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    If you get factory rifles to shoot that good then I have a few I'll lend you for load development. I don't think a custom rifle is for everyone, some people aren't particular and/or don't shoot enough. Bottom line is if you are satisfied w/ factory rifles by all means tear it up, but if you want a custom get one.

    Does the avg joe whitetail hunter need a custom to kill deer? Nope, but he just might want one. There are a million ways to analyze this topic but it really comes down to how badly do you want xyz components or are you happy w/ an off the shelf gun? Only you have the answer.

    PS, I'd really like to see some one hole groups
     
  3. engineer40

    engineer40 Well-Known Member

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    I've never shot a custom build so I appreciate your candor. My intention with the Ford vs Audi comparison was; maybe even though both rifles can accomplish similar things, are the custom builds much nicer to shoot?

    Load development is a pain in the butt sometimes and you're probably better at it than I personally am. Hopefully my comment didn't come across as boasting. That was definitely not the intent.

    This should take you to page 13 of a post I have been updating with a rifle I've been messing with. Easiest pic to show since I already have the pictures up.
    http://www.longrangehunting.com/forums/f17/just-bought-4-rem-783s-199-each-153783/index13.html
     
  4. Barrelnut

    Barrelnut Well-Known Member

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    I think how far you want to shoot is a factor. Some of those big heavy custom 300 RUMs, 338 Edges, and 338 Lapuas with 30" inch barrels you see in this forum can really reach out there with BIG heavy bullets. Harder to find that in a factory rifle sometimes.
     
  5. engineer40

    engineer40 Well-Known Member

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    And to add a little bit more clarification on why I posed my question is because I was reading a different forum post where a guy said "I have owned a few custom builds and will never buy factory again".

    I didn't want to highjack his thread. Getting a custom rifle is something I have been thinking about often. So I posted my question. Thanks!
     
  6. ohiohunter

    ohiohunter Well-Known Member

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    This was going to be my next move. This statement is valid w/ lighter calibers but those listed you almost have to go custom to get them.

    Not a problem, its less costly to learn from others than to learn on your own. A gun is a gun, they all go bang so there is nothing magic about a custom in that regard. Aside from throwing lead down range a custom is just that, a custom. You get to pick the stock, the action, the barrel, the contour, weight, LOP, trigger.... etc. You get to make it yours not an off the shelf one size fits all.
     
  7. azsugarbear

    azsugarbear Well-Known Member

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    The most practical reason for going custom is the barrel. Factory offerings are a "one size fits all". Stretching length from 26" to 30" gives you more velocity. A standard factory twist will sometimes not stabilize the big, heavy bullets many of us like for long range shooting. Factory chamberings don't give you any control over throating (where bullet touches the lands of the barrel). Being able to seat a bullet long allows more capacity for powder in the brass itself.

    Beyond the barrel, you have better stocks, triggers, etc. If you ultimately end up putting these improved items on your rifle, you probably would have been financially ahead of the game to build from the ground up.
     
  8. StrutNut

    StrutNut Well-Known Member

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    Well said! Tight groups at 100 yards is one thing and honestly I would hope factory could hang with custom. When you start pushing the range is where you see the barrel, stock, trigger, load development really start coming into play. Also, this is where you the shooter really can enhance or negate all the benefits of a custom.
     
  9. Doghunter23

    Doghunter23 Well-Known Member

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    Azsugarbear is right on the money! If your one of those guys (like I have done and learned my lesson) that ends up replacing everything on a new rifle but the action. Then your better off buying a higher quality custom action to start with and saving some $$. My thought being, buy an action then when funds become available get a barrel and so on.
     
  10. bullfrog

    bullfrog Well-Known Member

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    The biggest reason I go custom is because I cannot buy the exact rifle I want. Being able to pick the barrel length, flutes, contour, and chamber that I want along with the stock and trigger means I don't have to settle for what factory rifles offer. I have bought a lot of factory rifles over the years but now that I know exactly what I want it seems silly to settle for anything I don't really want. All those factory rifles don't see much use these days.
     
  11. MudRunner2005

    MudRunner2005 Well-Known Member

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    Exactly! This is exactly why I go custom, and it is for the same reasons. Plus, the extra peace of mind knowing that because it was properly blueprinted, that is one huge factor I no longer have to worry about affecting my rifle's accuracy.

    The only reason the few factory rifles I have left that remain factory, are because they do shoot as well as my customs. And once they need rebarreling (or I decide to change the caliber) they will be getting blueprinted, as well, just like all my other rifles.
     
  12. phorwath

    phorwath Well-Known Member

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    My experiences are that it requires a lot more load development time to find an accurate load in plain-Jane factory rifles than in customs. Which is OK for many, because they're loading and shooting and learning and shooting and loading and shooting. Most like to shoot.

    But having done that for a number of years with factory rifles, much time spent carefully chronographing MVs and recording data and results, I've come to much prefer a rifle that shoots most loads so well that I don't have to invest near as much time in load development. The customs will generally be much less finicky in what they'll shoot well. Now I should mention I don't shoot the Sendero weight barrels. Maybe factory rifles with bull barrels shoot better all in all than the lighter contour barrels I use. I use ~ #3 or #4 sporter contours on my customs. And most of my factory rifle experiences are the common factory sporter contour barrels. In addition, my rifles were all magnums. I could be wrong, but I think a .223 Rem can still shoot pretty accurately with some compromises in rifle quality, bedding, etc., compared to the heavier bullets and recoiling 7mm RM, 300 Win Mag, 338 Win Mag, .375 H&H.

    I just finished a custom with a Krieger barrel and BAT HR action. Instant accuracy. No time at all invested searching for the golden load that delivers good accuracy. I may be able to improve the rifle's accuracy if I spend more time at it, but it's already more than enough accurate for 1000-1100 yard large game hunting. And I don't have the need to shoot further than that in the mountains where I hunt.

    Just my $0.02 worth of experience and opinion. That's the biggest difference I've experienced in customs versus the sporter factory rifles in the magnum calibers I use in Alaska. Some factory rifles have failed to perform satisfactorily, even after lots of load and shoot time invested. The older one gets, the less time one has available to invest in dead ended efforts... :)
     
  13. roninflag

    roninflag Well-Known Member

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    the reason i add a krieger barrel to my remington 700 is to save money. it saves me time and money and endless driving back and forth to the range, trying countless combinations of primer powder and bullets. go from a 45$ barrel to a 450$ barrel ( installed). it is like going from a 2500$ engine in your taurus to a 25000.
     
  14. J E Custom

    J E Custom Well-Known Member

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    It is hard to justify a custom rifle unless you have owned one. In my mind there are many reasons to own at least one custom rifle. Pride of ownership, one of a kind, consistent accuracy (Most will shoot all ammo good and with the right loads, out shoot most of there owners) and as stated, longer ranges they tend to out perform all factory rifles because at 100 yards it is hard to see the difference in accuracy or consistency, but at 1000 yards the consistency of a well blue printed and barreled custom becomes obvious.

    If 1 MOA is fine for a person, He doesn't need a custom but if he is anal about the accuracy of his rifles, I would advise him to place a lot of thought in to building one.

    J E CUSTOM