Bipod suggestions

Discussion in 'Long Range Hunting & Shooting' started by brandon327, Oct 2, 2018.

  1. brandon327

    brandon327 Well-Known Member

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    what are the suggestions for a bipod or hunting ? I have seen some use a tripod. If you use a bipod what height? Just not sure what to get that is the most versitale. The hunting will be in New Mexico.
     
  2. cheechin

    cheechin Well-Known Member

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    I'm no bipod expert, so take my suggest for what its worth, but a friend of mine just recently bought the one in the link below and absolutely loves it, and I picked one up as well but havent got to use it yet.

    The quick attach is awesome - you can toss the bipod in your pack if you don't want to hike with it on, and it literally takes 3 seconds to clip on. Also, your sling attaches to the stud rather than through the bipod itself. The thing is built like a tank and has a bunch of different positions. I don't know what it weighs compared to the higher end ones, but I would guess its a little heavier, but I don't mind a few extra ounces. The company also sells the mounts separate, so you can put them on multiple guns and just use the one bipod and easily switch back and fourth. My buddy and I each bought the 8"-12.4".
     
  3. RogerPA

    RogerPA Member

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    "Atlas". Mine is the 9" to 14" model, which I believe weighs 12.7 oz. My gun has a pic rail for the bipod and the (almost) instant way it attaches or detaches is really great. And the ability to lock the legs in at a 45 degree angle (forward or backwards), also allows it to function much like a shorter model. There certainly are less expensive and lighter bipods out there, but I doubt you'll find one better made than the Atlas. Much luck on your hunt!
     
  4. WildRose

    WildRose Well-Known Member

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    Think long and hard about the terrain and foliage where you are going to be hunting.

    The harris 6-9" bipod is great on open or elevated terrain but absolutely useless in tall grass, brush, etc.

    The longer rifle mounted bipods I find to be generally less than useless, they just wobble too much because to make them heavy enough to be steady they'd make your rifle so front heavy as to be terribly ungainly in the field not to mention the problems if the legs are longer than the barrel.

    I have pretty well given up on bipods completely in the field and prefer to use adjustable height tripods like the gen2 Jim Shockey trigger sticks tripods.

    With them, again consider the terrain and foliage. They come in three heights that are completely appropriate for anything from prone to sitting/kneeling to standing.

    If you are in open tall grass country or where it's hilly enough that standing becomes necessary you can use the same model bipod on the back end to give you great stability for long shots in the field.
     
  5. WildRose

    WildRose Well-Known Member

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    I have the same bipod I use on my heavies, and it's great. One of the strongest built bipods ever built and rock steady.
     
  6. WildRose

    WildRose Well-Known Member

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    Cheech you forgot to add the link. We have no idea what bipod you are talking about.
     
  7. Lionheart

    Lionheart Member

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    I just use shooting sticks, they work well for me.
     
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  8. AZShooter

    AZShooter Well-Known Member

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    Have been shooting coues wt for over 35 years. Have been using Harris Bi-pod for at least 30 yrs. With our steep slopes and cross canyon shots evolved into using the 12-25" S model ( HB25S) We sit and glass with little walking except to the location and back out. Sure the system is heavy but very functional.

    Bipod is usually used in its lowest setting but sometimes some lengthening is required on steeper downhill/uphill slopes. I used to use a small bag until the bi-pod buddy was created. Have two versions, usually use the Big Buddy.
     
    Last edited: Oct 4, 2018
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  9. KyCarl

    KyCarl Well-Known Member

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    I have an Atlas but I prefer my pack? I have never really gotten the hang of bi-pod shooting. I like a truck hood ..hay bale..log ..rock..Then I just mash my pack however I need it..
     
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  10. cheechin

    cheechin Well-Known Member

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    Harris with a podlock is sort of the standard. But it's definitely heavy and will really change the balance of your rifle. Javelin is the lightest but very expensive. I have both...I mostly just end up shooting off my pack.
     
  11. Canhunter35

    Canhunter35 Well-Known Member

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    My favourites bipod is a Harris 9-13” with the notched legs. So easy to adjust ur height while prone and they will not slip
     
  12. WildRose

    WildRose Well-Known Member

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    My perseverance runs towards the smooth legs so I can get the cant precise. They can slip if you don't lock them properly but they are more precise.
     
  13. codyadams

    codyadams Well-Known Member

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    That is why you want to get the S model, you just use the notches to get within about 35° or so of level, and use the tilt ability to level the rifle. I have used this and the smooth leg model, and the S model with the notched legs is much quicker and easier to get exactly level than a non s model with the smooth legs. Also, if while getting comfortable for the shot one of the legs happen to sink in the dirt, instead of needing to readjust the leg, you simply tilt the rifle back to level, never needing to come off of shooting position.

    Hunting in Wyoming plains for pronghorn, as well as high back country deer and elk hunting, I prefer the Harris 9-13 S model with notched legs and a locking lever and a rear bag, with this set up on my rifle we have taken animals out to over 900 yds. Save yourself some money and buy the caldwell swivel lock lever instead of the harris, same thing but way cheaper.

    This is a good bipod, but keep in mind essentially all your shots must be from prone. If you find yourself required to shoot sitting or kneeling, you will need something else, such as a tripod front/bipod rear combo, or a tripod with hog saddle, ect. We have no problem with the 9-13 but our back country hunts we usually are shooting across canyons, so finding a good spot suitable for prone is easy enough, and prone in the desert for pronghorn has never been a challenge. If you have the extra money, get the Atlas, they are a little more steady and very strong. Not that we have had problems with the harris, but it never hurts to take some wobble out of the equation.
     
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  14. WildRose

    WildRose Well-Known Member

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    Fair point. I had a couple of the early S models and they had problems with the locks. I understand they've fixed that but I haven't tried any since.

    The grass is so tall most of the places I hunt I shoot more standing than anything and I've grown fond of the short tripods when the grass isn't a problem.