Scope leveling idea

davidu

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Aug 2, 2020
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34
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North Texas
Got it
Wish I had that inherent ability, but sadly I don’t
Since LR shooting didn’t really exist when I started hunting 50 years ago I’m sure I have canted my rifles until recently attempting Longer distances
So now I’m afflicted without the level crutch 😐
 

Dirtrax

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Mar 23, 2014
Messages
262
Sorry if it came across that way, but no I don't. Yes, I try level my action, bolt raceway level, level on pic rail to verify. Level the reticle. I think it is imperative to to try learn w/o the crutch, and there is a system just for that. I use a bubble on my 7 saum that I shoot to 2K+, the rest i do not. I was banging 1.5moa plate at 1600 with a 6 BRA last Sunday w/o a level. I would just as soon not use one if possible.
I’m with you until I have fur in my scope. The mountains and of course valley’s, fog, and brush make finding level a task I won’t risk. On steel a bit off target is a miss, with animals it becomes an arduous task of tracking and unnecessary suffering. Given that, I continue to find a good effort at leveling scope to bore more than adequate for my shooting distance. This includes an anti-cant device. Those that shoot at extreme distance probably require more. It seems that most folks will find an answer short of obsession that works well for them. Others may require it.
 

Laguna Freak

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Jan 5, 2015
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372
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South Central Texas, just north of the Wall
You're right, circles have no inherent level. However, they do have a centerpoint. You say "... the scope is true to gravity and perpendicular" and here's where I get confused, because we seem to be dealing with multiple (and potentially erroneous) definitions of "perpendicular". As a thought test, imagine a setup where the scope is rotated a little, and if you extended the reticle's vertical axis, it would miss the bore's centerline. When you shoot you could unconsciously rotate the rifle slightly and the scope's vertical axis would be perpendicular to gravity, as you mentioned, but out of alignment with rifle's bore. The more elevation you apply to the scope, the further off the POI would get. It seems to be that the only requirement for scope leveling is to get the reticle's vertical axis to pass through the bore's centerpoint, and absent problems with scope tracking, all POI changes will occur along this line. Again, I'm testing my understanding, am I missing something key here?
I think you are spot on. However while aligning vertical with bore center line, I think it imperative that horizontal aligns with stock bottom. Because accurate field shooting at longer ranges is dependent on the shooter’s sense and feel of level and plumb while sighting the target through the scope. This sense is realized through the hands and eyes connection to the body and brain. Some shooters have a more refined inherent sense or feel of level and plumb than others.

Of course, some scopes have an internal level bubble you can see while shooting to aid the shooter in his/her senses.
 

Kimber7man

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Jul 1, 2008
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1,029
I use this:


and get it leveled. Then put the rings on, and the scope in the rings. Slide a stack of business cards between the flat spot on the bottom of the scope turret and the pic rail, using enough cards so the scope bottom is flat against the cards, and tighten er up.

works every time.
 

wapitiaddict

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Oct 29, 2018
Messages
138
Location
Idaho
I've created a link below to a youtube video of a guy that explains why you don't need your rifle level - all you need is your scope level with gravity. Basically, if I understand right, there is a difference between rifle cant and scope cant when siting in your rifle. Rifle can't doesn't matter, scope cant does. He even tests his theory at 800 yards with his rifle at a 45 degree angle to his scope (his scope being level with gravity). Pretty interesting. He seems to make a good argument, and sounds pretty legit, but I'm no expert.

Canting your rifle. The truth: its not important
 
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Tulsa Reiner

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Jan 6, 2014
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327
Location
Tulsa, OK
You have more faith in the product in your pic than I would, what do you use to level the clamp on? If you need a level to level the clamp on, would you not now be level, more or less eliminating the need for it?
"Every measurement is relative to something else" (paraphrased from Einstein).
Nothing is absolute,when it comes down to measurements. :p
 

ntsqd

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Nov 16, 2015
Messages
796
Location
Upper SoKA
I use this:


and get it leveled. Then put the rings on, and the scope in the rings. Slide a stack of business cards between the flat spot on the bottom of the scope turret and the pic rail, using enough cards so the scope bottom is flat against the cards, and tighten er up.

works every time.
I built something similar from a 1/4" plate, a circular bubble level, three M6x1.0's in tapped holes in the plate (hold them by their heads in a drill press and while spinning file the ends rounded), and a 12" pictinny rail, all sourced from amazon. After leveling the plate the first time I checked and confirmed both the plate and the top of the rail with a digital level.

Instead of the stack of cards look up the Arisaka tool that I linked earlier in this thread. I've used mine exactly once and am happy with it and the results that it produced.
 

Muddyboots

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Feb 7, 2013
Messages
1,106
Location
Michigan
I've been using this target that I made up years ago as a means to verify my alignment and seems to really help show the alignment pretty good. Simple hold on bottom and dial scope to show landing impacts. Good test for scope as well. Granted it only works shorter range dial ups but still provides what I need to know or not know! Flip it and you can see bullet drops as well. This is on legal size paper.
 

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