New Remington 700 XCR II Patterning Problem

Discussion in 'Long Range Hunting & Shooting' started by Midwestguy92, Aug 21, 2015.

  1. Midwestguy92

    Midwestguy92 Member

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    I recently purchased a new Remington 700 XCR II 300 Win Mag. The rifle is topped with a Leupold VX-6 scope. I bought two boxes of ammunition with the gun: the Federal Premium Vital Shot 180 grain Nosler Partition's and the Barnes Vor-Tx 180 grain Tipped Tsx-BT to see which would pattern better.

    Thus far I have shot 18 rounds of the Federal and 11 rounds of the Barnes with the gun in a lead sled and a cold barrel on every shot. However, neither seem to be patterning. Both bullets have a 2.5in - 3in group at 100 yards.

    Any suggestions?

    As always, your input is greatly appreciated!

    Thanks,
    Midwestguy
     
  2. roninflag

    roninflag Well-Known Member

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    i have never used a lead sled. what are you going to shoot elk? deer?
     
  3. Midwestguy92

    Midwestguy92 Member

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    The gun will primarily be used to hunt midwest whitetail. However, this fall I will be hunting Alaskan Yukon Moose.
     
  4. WildRose

    WildRose Well-Known Member

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    CHeck the torque on your trigger guard screws. The cheap plastic stock is probably your biggest problem.
     
  5. FEENIX

    FEENIX Well-Known Member

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    Also, make sure that the lead sled is not further contributing to the problem. I use lead sled myself with very good success during load development and barrel break in only.

    Please take no offense but isolate the shooter issue and have a friend shoot it too. Sometimes, it very well could be that you just haven't found the right factory ammo that your rifle likes.

    I normally shoot a couple of boxes of ammo in my factory rifles for the barrel break in process before I even worry about any grouping.

    Good luck!
     
  6. roninflag

    roninflag Well-Known Member

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    Midwest- i shoot very little factory ammo. i did shoot some 180 federal tsx several years ago out of my sendero 300 win mag. they shot into .181" at 100 yards. QUITE a bit less than my handloads that go .5-.6. . A moose is a large target. I have my own preference to bullet i would use on moose and whitetail . For factory ammo moose - the 180 - 1. tipped trophy bonded, 2- the 180 partition that you already shot. But looking at the federal ammo list all of the 165 to 200 grain would be fine except the 190 match king. i would make sure the trigger is adjusted , scope rings tight, clean it and try another box of ammo.
     
  7. gohring3006

    gohring3006 Well-Known Member LRH Team Member

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    I agree with WildRose.

    Also I have a .300 Weatherby Vanguard and it shot 2-3 inch groups with everything I shot in it. I checked for action binding by loosening each action screw separately, and checking for movement by wrapping my hand around the barrel and forearm tip. It was binding BAD!! I couldn't stop it from binding, no matter what I tried. So I ordered a Boyds Pro Varmint and a Score High Pillar Bedding Kit from Midway. I pillar bedded the Boyds and checked for action binding and there was none, so I went ahead and glass bedded the action. Plus I added a brake and now its a true Sub MOA shooter.
     
  8. WildRose

    WildRose Well-Known Member

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    None taken. All of us who are honest have to admit that sometimes the shooter IS the problem. Some days the answer is just to go do something else and come back for another try.
     
  9. FEENIX

    FEENIX Well-Known Member

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    Sorry WR but the comment was meant for the OP ... I was just agreeing with you and piggy backed from your comment. :):D:rolleyes::cool:

    Your last sentence reminds me of one of my range time in 1992 when I was stationed in Davis-Monthan AFB in Tucson, AZ. I was at then Tucson Rod and Gun Club (no longer exist); fired 3-shots each for 3 rifles and packed them. While waiting for the range to clear so I can recover my targets, I was admiring the beautiful rifle the guy next to me was shooting. It was a Blaser rifle (don't remember the exact model) with some very intricate engravings on the stock and action in .30-06 topped with S&B (also don't remember the model).

    He seems like he was having all kinds of trouble and very frustrated. There's about 5 more minutes of shooting time when he asked me if I wanted try to shoot his rifle. Without hesitation, I obliged :D, as I try to position myself, I noticed 2 empty boxes of ammo on the ground and another half empty box on the table. As I try to acquire the target, it is clear that his grouping was all over the place. I fired 3-shots and they were ~.5-.75"" group at 100 yards.

    The best advice I can give him at the time was to pack it and come back another day. Unfortunately, that was the last time I ever saw him.
     
  10. AZShooter

    AZShooter Well-Known Member

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    Nothing is more frustrating than buying a new rifle, factory or custom to discover it won't shoot.
    I think you will have to go through a check list on the rifle to see if you can find something wrong.

    Or see a gunsmith and have him go over it. Be sure to bring your targets.



    So often the problem is in the fit of the stock. I keep a checklist in my documents in case I forget something. Here is the list:


    Barrel having adequate clearance where it is supposed to be floated. Often Remingtons come with fore end contact/pressure. I prefer to float the fore end.

    Mag box must not bind on sides or make contact with bottom of stock

    Recoil lug should not make contact with bottom of stock recess, could cause rocking/binding

    Forward screw of front base touching threads of barrel shank causing a false tightness and loose front base.

    Action screw holes in stock too small. Drill holes larger so sides of action screw won't touch stock

    Bolt handle touching stock

    Trigger group must not touch stock

    Trigger guard must not touch trigger

    Action screws properly torqued

    Poor crown, optimal way is to check with bore scope

    Clean bore

    --------------------------
     
  11. WY Patriot

    WY Patriot Well-Known Member

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    I have a 338 xcr that was very pinicy about ammo. But another suggestion is if that sled is the newer one with the black adjustment knob on the rear, check and see if the plastic pad rocks from side to side as you apply pressure Mine did and groups sucked, also are you using a shot bag for weight if so remove it and let the sled move a little, also check scope to see if its sliding forward due to recoil and sled being stationary, been there too.

    Good luck


    Don
     
  12. 450hunter

    450hunter Well-Known Member

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    I also have a new Remington XCR II 338 RUM that I am having issues finding a good accurate load. It seems to shoot about 11/2- 2" groups. I have only tried 300 grn berger bullets with RL 25 & 33. I was hoping to make this a long range shooter for hunting. I did notice some forearm contact with the barrel I need to take care of. I will probably just take it and have it glass bedded. I have never tried doing it myself. Also this is my first Remington and I hope to make it work because my 2 boys gave it to me for Christmas.
     
  13. cohunter14

    cohunter14 Well-Known Member

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    Have you shot anything else yet? If not, with only 29 rounds down the tube, the barrel probably isn't broken in yet. Have you gone through any break-in with it?
     
  14. FearNoWind

    FearNoWind Well-Known Member

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    The stock has no value other than to hold the barreled action in its correct position relative to the shooter's aim point. But it has to hold the mechanical elements securely throughout the firing process, without introducing pressure at any point.
    Remove the barreled action from the stock, open up the barrel channel (like OPEN IT UP) and re-bed the action with proper torque.
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