Carlos hathcocks rifle

Kidder

Active Member
Joined
Nov 25, 2012
Messages
29
Seen a nice picture of Carlos hathcocks rifle and noticed that the scope wasn't really all that fancy or anything. Looked just like a normal hunting scope. I'm a newbie on scopes and just know a little to get me by. But how would he know what he's zeroing his rifle at? I think I may be overlooking something or having a major brain fart.
 

MudRunner2005

Well-Known Member
Joined
Oct 13, 2008
Messages
14,708
Location
Alabama
Snipers have more than one weapons system, depending on their mission at-hand. However, I'm assuming you're talking about his old Winchester Model 70 .30-06 Sprg, that looked like a deer rifle? I've seen some interviews with him, where he stated his scope was a basic mil-dot scope, and he knew his zero, had established distances from his position, and used a lot of Kentucky windage...

The same basic principles that modern snipers use, except now they have fancier optics with exposed turrets and lots of elevation and windage adjustment for dialing your reticle, so you can dial it with more precisise accuracy than with guess work and halving your scope.
 

Kidder

Active Member
Joined
Nov 25, 2012
Messages
29
Snipers have more than one weapons system, depending on their mission at-hand. However, I'm assuming you're talking about his old Winchester Model 70 .30-06 Sprg, that looked like a deer rifle? I've seen some interviews with him, where he stated his scope was a basic mil-dot scope, and he knew his zero, had established distances from his position, and used a lot of Kentucky windage...

The same basic principles that modern snipers use, except now they have fancier optics with exposed turrets and lots of elevation and windage adjustment for dialing your reticle, so you can dial it with more precisise accuracy than with guess work and halving your scope.
So he Kentucky windaged all of his shots? Or did he also use MOA? If so how did he know he was back on zero because I dont think that optic could track or have zero stop
 

MudRunner2005

Well-Known Member
Joined
Oct 13, 2008
Messages
14,708
Location
Alabama
So he Kentucky windaged all of his shots? Or did he also use MOA? If so how did he know he was back on zero because I dont think that optic could track or have zero stop
That I don't know...I'm not him. I think he would be the only one who could answer that question, and he is no longer alive. But I have seen interviews where he does talk about a few of his more famous shots where he had to use Kentucky windage, and about having to holdover on shots (AKA - Halving your scope).

Halving the scope (or a holdover) is where you use your dots to draw invisible lines on the X and Y axis, creating a new invisible central point of aim (POA) in the reticle by using your Mils or MOA bars as a way of making up for a lack of adjustability.
 

Kidder

Active Member
Joined
Nov 25, 2012
Messages
29
That I don't know...I'm not him. I think he would be the only one who could answer that question, and he is no longer alive. But I have seen interviews where he does talk about a few of his more famous shots where he had to use Kentucky windage, and about having to holdover on shots (AKA - Halving your scope).

Halving the scope (or a holdover) is where you use your dots to draw invisible lines on the X and Y axis, creating a new invisible central point of aim (POA) in the reticle by using your Mils or MOA bars as a way of making up for a lack of adjustability.
Interesting. Very interesting. Thanks for answering this question!
 

roninflag

Well-Known Member
Joined
Feb 27, 2006
Messages
3,248
Location
az
There is a big article on Hathcock in Precision shooting magazine. Also there are several books about him. He was both a champion marksman and master of stealth. Hathcock won at camp perry. I am working out of town and I can't remember how many times he won. I have shot in competition many times out to 1000 yards. For me to use Hathcock's techniques with any degree of success I believe I would need to win at camp perry. I will tell you that given the technology and equipment we have now; my experience tells me the techniques/ equipment Chris Kyle used are going to give more consistent results. ron
 

Greyfox

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 21, 2008
Messages
5,592
Location
Northeast
Hathcocks primary set-up was a Model 70(pre-64), 30-06 target rifle with a heavy barrel, and Unertle 8x scope. He also used on occasion a Remington M40, basically a Remington ADL Varmint 308 rifle that was produced specially for the USMC in 1965 or so. It was supplied with a Redfield 3x9 mounted with Redfield base/rings. Check out Texas Brigade Armory. They produce a pretty accurate copy of the Model 70 that was Used by Hathcock.
 

FEENIX

Well-Known Member
LRH Team Member
Joined
Dec 20, 2008
Messages
14,167
Location
Great Falls, MT
Seen a nice picture of Carlos hathcocks rifle and noticed that the scope wasn't really all that fancy or anything. Looked just like a normal hunting scope. I'm a newbie on scopes and just know a little to get me by. But how would he know what he's zeroing his rifle at? I think I may be overlooking something or having a major brain fart.
Scope alone does not make the sniper rifle or the nut behind the trigger, esp. early on. Check out this list; 10 Deadliest Snipers in History. #1 Gives Me Chills.

Hathcock is in #2.
 

Trending threads

Top