7mm Remington Mag for all around hunting??

Discussion in 'Long Range Hunting & Shooting' started by Dalebow, Aug 10, 2015.

  1. Dalebow

    Dalebow Well-Known Member

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    What are your thoughts on using a 7mm rem mag, shoots .450 with the Nosler 150 grain long range Accubond? I am wanting to simplify and use one gun for antelope thru Elk, and maybe one moose hunt. Wouldn't use it on bears other than a black bear. Would allow me to invest in a great scope and learn the rifle and trajectory in detail. Ive hunted a lot with 300 win mag but thinking I might want a little less recoil.
    thanks
     
  2. MudRunner2005

    MudRunner2005 Well-Known Member

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    In my opinion, YES, the 7mm RemMag is the best all-around hunting caliber for North American game. You can load light bullets (100-140) for varmints and coyotes. You can load mid-weight bullets (150-168gr) for antelope, whitetails and mulies. And you can load the heavy bullets (175-180) for elk, moose, bear, etc... Manageable recoil. Not overly excessive on muzzle blast. Tons of factory ammo options (if you don't handload). Brass can be found everywhere. 7mm has tons of bullet options.

    Whatever you do, make sure your 7mm RemMag has a true 1:9 twist, that way you can take advantage of the versatility from 100-180gr bullets.
     
  3. Dalebow

    Dalebow Well-Known Member

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    My thoughts exactly, just wanted some real world opinions from those who have used the 7mm rem mag:)
     
  4. MudRunner2005

    MudRunner2005 Well-Known Member

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    I've had four individual 7mm RemMag rifles (one of which was recently rebarreled with another 7mmRM barrel, so I guess you could count it as a 5th rifle?) over the years, and still have 2 of them. The one I rebarreled is my go-to whitetail rifle, with Berger 168 VLD's.

    I might be a fan... :D
     
  5. Broz

    Broz Well-Known Member

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    The 7 Rem Mag is a good choice, and will do all you want it to do. I just much prefer a 30 with 200+ gr bullets for elk or Moose. I have seen many elk fall with both 7's and 30's , despite what some think, there is a difference.

    Jeff
     
  6. Creedmoor shooter

    Creedmoor shooter Well-Known Member

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    Ditto. Very well said. My dad and grandfather have used that round for 20+ years with great success. Using it for everything from woodchucks to moose. Its one of my all time favorites.
     
  7. scf

    scf Well-Known Member

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    Listen to what Broz said. He has more experience with elk that most on this forum and an ounce of real world experience is worth more than a pound of Internet expertise. I would also recommend the 300wm if elk is a possibility. You can always load down if desired.
     
  8. roninflag

    roninflag Well-Known Member

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    i have shot a bunch of elk, some deer , antelope and a bighorn sheep with the 7mm mag. worked great. the rifle and scope are at least as important as the caliber/cartrdge.
     
  9. mrb1982

    mrb1982 Well-Known Member

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    I agree with all previous comments. I have a 7 RM, would like a 300 WM for the reasons Broz states, but after shooting a sub .5 MOA group out to 1062 yards last time out, I decided that the 7RM I have with the 180gr bullets will do whatever I need. If I had to do it all over again, I would probably go for the 300 WM, but just can't let my 7RM Sendero go.
     
  10. MudRunner2005

    MudRunner2005 Well-Known Member

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    You're right...My 1.5 decades of hands-on 7mmRM hunting experience means nothing. :rolleyes:

    Have I killed an elk...No. But I know plenty of people who have...With ALL different calibers...Even .25 caliber rifles. Then again, I've seen idiots on youtube shooting whitetails with a .50 BMG like a bunch of morons. So, I guess you're right to take the internet with a grain of salt.

    Jeff knows what he's talking about. And for the most part I trust his judgement, especially when hunting animals that I have not.

    I have a bunch of 7mm rifles, and a bunch of .30 caliber rifles... I trust one just as much as the other to properly do the job. I trust my 7mm-08 as much as my .308 Win, my 7mm RemMags as much as my .300 WinMag, 7mm STW's as much as my .300 Ackley. And if I had a .280 AI, I would trust it as much as my .30-06 AI...But I haven't gotten around to building my .280 AI yet. But soon... :cool:

    In the end, a good solid vitals shot on any game animal within a rifle's acceptable distance, is going to be a kill shot. Some days they drop, some days they run... You never know how an animal's going to react to being shot...Unless you hit them in the CNS, then they'll drop and be dead before they hit the dirt.

    The new Berger 7mm 195 will be coming out soon, will be a complete game-changer and should bring the 7mm back to the fore-front of LR big game hunting calibers.
     
  11. scf

    scf Well-Known Member

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    I am a fan of big 7's but after having a medium bull walk off from a 175 swift a frame from a 7 STW to the shoulder I upgraded to a 338LM. So now between a 7 and a 30 cal I will choose the larger with the heaviest bullet it will shoot well. I went on my hunt armed with Internet chat about 1000 or 1500 ft lb being all that was necessary but my elk walked away from 2400 plus ft lb. Yes a well placed "behind the shoulder" shot with a 7 is better than a gut shot from a 338 but with the same shot placement the advantage goes to the larger bullet. Before my hunt I compared a 7 with 180 gr, 30 with 210 gr and 338 with 300 gr. Not being a fan of brakes I chose the 7 because of the recoil and comparable drops. Now I will be toting the 338 with a big brake (recoil is very mild) and wearing ear protection (which in reality I should have been wearing with any rifle). The rifle choice is obviously up to the individual and I do not wish to disrespect anyone's choice but my elk hunting is limited and I want to stack the odds in my favor every way I can.
     
  12. fmajor

    fmajor Well-Known Member

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    I've been shooting a 7mm Rem Mag since 1983 and absolutely love it. I've also had an exceptional 300 Win Mag and loved it. However, my 7mm Rem Mag was my high-school graduation present and it will always have a place in my safe. I've killed loads and loads of whitetails at ranges out to 525yds and it's always done the job.

    I've *not yet* killed an elk (that will change this year gun)!!!!) so I don't personally know how well it will do. However, I'm quite confident it will suffice. My 300 Win Mag would also have done the job to a greater distance, but my trusty 7 stayed with me while the 300 went down the road...

    To me, the choice is made not simply by determining your specific hunting *needs*, but also what you like and equally important - what you E N J O Y (so long as you're reasonably assessing the rifle/cartridges capability).

    As a hunting cartridge the 300 Win Mag is superior to the 7mm Rem Mag. The empirical data illustrates that reality perfectly. Refusal to accept this fact is not logical. However, personal enjoyment is part of the hunting/shooting equation as much as a chambering's capability.

    Heck, I'm dreaming of a big, fast 338 CheyTac-type chambering for hunting elk in places where a long distance shot is likely, but my next rifle is going to be a custom rifle chambered in 7mm/300 Win Mag to split the difference :D.
     
  13. MudRunner2005

    MudRunner2005 Well-Known Member

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    Not to start a caliber war here, but how is the .300WM so vastly superior to the 7mmRM when they will both push equal weight-for-caliber bullets with similar BC's, at equal-for-weight velocities? Wouldn't that make them pretty much equal?

    That being said, I think confidence in, and knowing your equipment is just as important as any other aspect of it.
     
  14. Broz

    Broz Well-Known Member

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    Yes, they are both great calibers, but all I was saying if you hit elk with a 180 gr bullet from a 7 compared to a 215 or 230 from a 300 there is a visible difference. Seen it many times. Both will and do kill elk, but one has more killing potential than the other. It is that simple.

    As far as comparing in this manner "equal weight-for-caliber bullets " why would you want to handicap the larger rifle with a lighter bullet when that caliber has a larger bullet available. The only answer is, to handicap the 300 to make it look equal to the 7.

    I choose to load them both to the full potential that they both can be loaded to for my comparisons. For this the 300 will win in energy and SD at distance. I personally believe these are two important thing to consider when going for elk and moose as stated by the OP.

    I do not in any way dislike either. Like has been stated in a gazillion threads here already. They are both great chamberings. Just the facts.

    Jeff