300 wm 178 eld-x or 200 eld-x

Awol469

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Feb 12, 2020
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New to the site, and wanted to ask your opinion. I have done a lot of searching and can't seem to get to the answer I'm looking for. I have a CA Mesa LR in 300wm and I'm having a hard time deciding between the 178 eld-x and the 200 eld-x, that is if the rifle likes either one. I'm looking for something that can do it all, antelope, muley, white tail, black bear, elk. I guess my main concern is that the 200 is going to be to much for the smaller animals, but the 178 might not be enough at longer ranges. I will be reloading and probably running RL 23, or RL 26. I appreciate any and all the advice, thanks in advance.
 

Jpron

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Feb 10, 2019
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I’ve tried both in several different rifles. I have not taken a critter with either. I’m still working loads, but out of the 3 rifles I’ve tried, the 200 groups far better the the 178. I’d try both and see if either work. That right there might answer your question. Guys might think I’m crazy but in my opinion you can’t kill em to dead
 

Steves1911

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Feb 1, 2020
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Im messing with the 212gr eldx in my 300win right now. So far it looks very promising. I havent tried handloading the 200gr eldx yet but factory precision hunter is just under moa from my factory savage.
 

Jpron

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The 212’s are pretty sweet also. I put togethera savage 111 long range for a friend last winter and ended up going with them. The ballistics on both the 00 and 12’s are both very impressive. I was getting right around 2900 FPS with both.
 

Imperial Bull

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Jul 17, 2011
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In one of my 300 win mags I shoot the 212 eldx. Excellent accuracy with H1000 and good results on a couple bears and a 6 point bull. You'll just have to find out what your rifle prefers, and I would not worry about a 200+ grain bullet being too much for the smaller animals. Dead is dead and a lot of the time a heavier bullet going slower has less meat damage. Also, a 178 should work fine, just know your limitations. Give a couple different ones a try. I personally would start on the heavier side.
 

Awol469

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Feb 12, 2020
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Thanks all, has anyone have experience taking deer size animal with 200+ grain, any yardage, damage. I was leaning towards 23 and 26 because of temp stable and copper additives, sorry not trying to make this a reloading post. I will post a new thread later of my trial and errors with that when I get to that point, a little to cold here to start that right now, lol.
 

Elkeater

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Dec 3, 2017
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The .300 win mags tend to shine especially at longer ranges with 200+ grain bullets. I wouldn’t worry about the 200gr being too much bullet. I shoot everything with a 199 hammer hunter in my .300 WM and I don’t feel like I’ve destroyed anything small and I’ve shot 50lb javalinas with mine and a100 lb red sheep ewe. I’d go with 200s if it was me as long as they shoot well.
 

Elkeater

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Now that I think about the hammers are copper not cup and core like the elds so maybe I’m comparing apples to oranges. Still in the same weight class though.
 

B-LOT Banga

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New to the site, and wanted to ask your opinion. I have done a lot of searching and can't seem to get to the answer I'm looking for. I have a CA Mesa LR in 300wm and I'm having a hard time deciding between the 178 eld-x and the 200 eld-x, that is if the rifle likes either one. I'm looking for something that can do it all, antelope, muley, white tail, black bear, elk. I guess my main concern is that the 200 is going to be to much for the smaller animals, but the 178 might not be enough at longer ranges. I will be reloading and probably running RL 23, or RL 26. I appreciate any and all the advice, thanks in advance.
I have tried the eldx line in my Fierce 300 WSM. Started with the 178, 200 and 212. My 24” barrel shot very well with the 178 gr and best with the 200 gr. The 212 was slower and it’s added BC didn’t make any advantage over the 200 gr. I have not shot any elk just sheep, goats, axis deer and wild cattle. I couldn’t tell any difference between the 178 gr and 200 up to 500 yds except for the clicks, maybe more experienced shooters can chime in. However the 200 gr drifted less at long range even with mild 15-20 mph winds. Try both and see what works well in your particular rifle. I have confidence that both heads will work great and the 200 grain won't be too much. I use the 220 eldx in my fierce 300 RUM as per test targets and it’s a hammer!!
 

WildRose

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New to the site, and wanted to ask your opinion. I have done a lot of searching and can't seem to get to the answer I'm looking for. I have a CA Mesa LR in 300wm and I'm having a hard time deciding between the 178 eld-x and the 200 eld-x, that is if the rifle likes either one. I'm looking for something that can do it all, antelope, muley, white tail, black bear, elk. I guess my main concern is that the 200 is going to be to much for the smaller animals, but the 178 might not be enough at longer ranges. I will be reloading and probably running RL 23, or RL 26. I appreciate any and all the advice, thanks in advance.
A heavier bullet in the same caliber is never "too much for smaller animals".

Go to Africa and look at the most common rounds used on "The tiny ten" and small plains game. You'll find that many if not most are shot with a .375 H&H as it's the most common of all safari calibers.

The concern with the ELDX is that at high velocity they tend to come apart and can then blow really big holes in smaller game wasting a lot of meat or may fail to penetrate deep enough on tough bodies/heavy bodied game.

Personally I'd say that if you like the Hornady Bullets take a look at the 180gr Interbond or 165gr GMX and you'll have the best of all worlds at least for shooting inside of 600 yards.

With the ELD's which I've shot quite a few of you're better off saving them for 400yds and beyond and really beyond 600yds because of the frangibility.
 

Awol469

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Feb 12, 2020
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Montana
Thanks again all for the quick response, seems the consensus is definitely go heavier, and also looks like I might need to look at other options as well. I mainly was going with the eld-x due to how well the 143's shoot in my 6.5. But I guess that's the beauty of reloading, you have all the options at your fingertips to try, just need to get out of my Hornady box, lol. Again can't thank you all enough, now just need some better weather to get out and get this rifle broke in.
 

crazyhorse

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I went through a similar adventure this fall getting ready for an elk hunt. I wound up settling on the 200 ELD-X using H4831SC due to incredible accuracy averaging just over 3000fps. The 215 Berger was also an option but in the limited time I had, the 200 ELD-X gave much lower ES and SD's.

The important part is that I was fortunate enough to shoot a mature 5x6 elk the first day and he went down as if struck by lightening! The shot was (going from memory) 400-410yds caliber size entry with no exit. I'm not going to be one of those guys who complains about no exit wound on my very dead elk!

In terms of meat damage between the 178 and the 200, its likely to be negligible with other factors such as striking bone, distance, and the particular position of the animal being more influential than a difference of 22 grains of bullet between the two.
 

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