Longrangers

Well-Known Member
Joined
May 31, 2017
Messages
161
I too, am in PA, and Sportsmans Warehouse carries Crispi. There is a store in Harrisburg, Chambersburg, Erie, Washington where you could try a pair on.
I went to the Harrisburg sportsman warehouse house and they didn’t have any any and the individual on the floor said that they probably won’t have any and it would all be online. Center boot company near state college has several different models of crispi. Cabelas in Hamburg has zamborlans insulated made exclusively for Cabelas or if you refer to it as Macy’s like several of us do.
 

Livvvv2Hunt

Member
Joined
Jul 27, 2011
Messages
12
Location
Grand Rapids, MI
I've tried most everything out there my go to boots for spot & stalk mountain terrain are Crispi Wild Rock GTX in 400 gram. They are amazingly comfortable and supportive, the soles have great traction and don't load up in snow or mud. Great ankle support for sidehilling comfortable 50F-15F. But when the mercury drops, no questions asked I'm reaching for my Schnees Extreme 13" pac boots, these are also great if you're crossing alot of water.
 

charliewhisky

Well-Known Member
Joined
Sep 7, 2010
Messages
47
Non Issue military combat boots that are allowed by the military for duty wear. They cost less than issue which appeals to lower ranking soldiers with less pay. That is why a very few makers are designated by the Army Command Sargent Major as authorized. As a civilian you can't buy issued boots. Designed by experts and quality controlled. The marine version can even be resoled. They are designed for a tight fit for support. For cold weather, you would want to buy a size allowing warm socks. I get by in Ga with a pair sized with army issue socks. I have been trying to wear a pair out for at least five years after getting tired of buying both cheap and expensive boots that don't do the job. Lots of support on GA hills.
 

SixDemonBag

Well-Known Member
LRH Team Member
Joined
Apr 6, 2020
Messages
286
Location
Parts unknown....
Non Issue military combat boots that are allowed by the military for duty wear. They cost less than issue which appeals to lower ranking soldiers with less pay. That is why a very few makers are designated by the Army Command Sargent Major as authorized. As a civilian you can't buy issued boots. Designed by experts and quality controlled. The marine version can even be resoled. They are designed for a tight fit for support. For cold weather, you would want to buy a size allowing warm socks. I get by in Ga with a pair sized with army issue socks. I have been trying to wear a pair out for at least five years after getting tired of buying both cheap and expensive boots that don't do the job. Lots of support on GA hills.
Your experience must have been different.

I have been wearing Military issue boots on pretty much every continent for the past 29 years of active duty... I would not trade a single pair, issued or not, for my Crispis or my Danners. Not even a chance. Couldn't pay me to do it.
 
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tndeputy

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Joined
Jul 30, 2020
Messages
111
Location
tennessee
I just got the Crispi guide boots and I really like them.I am not an expert on the high end hunting boots as they are the first ones I have bought. I tried on every brand I could find and chose the crispi. They are the most comfortable boots I have ever had hard not to wear them every day
 

JustMe2

Well-Known Member
Joined
Feb 18, 2012
Messages
280
Thank you guys who responded about my Danners. I've always thought they were comfortable and durable when I wore them and you confirmed it. You saved me a bunch of money experimenting with yet another boot -- I've already got more leather, rubber, and synthetic boots than I'll be able to wear out in my lifetime. You know it's easy to waste money chasing something better that turns out not to be better. The proverbial gold watch.
 

fnlights

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 15, 2021
Messages
162
Location
Pennsylvania
I hunted CO in 2020 and my boots fell apart! So, I went to a store in Steamboat and bought Crispi Wyoming GTX. With no break in and good socks, they were awesome!! No blisters or hot spots. A snow storm brought about a foot of snow, so we wound up sleeping in my truck (front seats laid back) and I didn’t take the boots off for 2 complete days, sleeping with them on. Buy them with confidence!
Wow that should be a Crispi commercial haha
 

Betarider

Well-Known Member
Joined
Oct 20, 2019
Messages
111
Location
Morgantown,WV
I’ve had 3x Kennetreks, 2xSalomons, 4xCrispi, 2xLowa, Zamberlan, Danner, Keen etc.

I live in the southwest, so cold is not an issue. After trying them all I prefer the Crispis for my needs. They are very comfortable to me and great all around boots. I’ve always preferred the Nevada’s.

The pairs of Kennetreks I have owned have also been great boots, just a bit rigid for me. If I were going up into big mountains, as in Idaho or Alaska or whatever, I would probably enjoy them much more than I do down here in our lower Rocky Mtns and one the desert hills. My kids used to call the Kennetreks my storm trooper boots cause they were so stiff. They hold water pretty well too, if you have to cross a River the hard way ;)

I do buy the Kennetrek seal/wax and keep all of my boots lubed up with it at least once or twice a year.

Lowa renegades are great on the feet, but I’ve had two pairs where the side stitching separated on the edges where they articulate. Frustrating, but not hard to fix.

Good boots are a blessing when you’re hunting or hiking. Keep your feet in good shape and you’ll hunt longer and harder.

I catch heck for it, but I have been known to get a pedicure or two during the fall and it sure helps my feet out a lot. There’s even a picture floating around of me asleep in the pedicure chair with a Coors Light in my hand and a steamed towel wrapped around my face while my feet were soaking in some juice concauction that looked like a pineapple margarita. Sometimes they even do a ziplock bag full of hot parafin fun wax on each foot and they squeeze it In between my toes, then when it sets up they peel it off. That’s what I get for going to a salon owned by my wife’s friends, I show up with a 6 pack and a couple bottles of wine in the late afternoon and become the entertainment for the day. Haha its a little awkward but so worth it.

JM
Unlike most people I live in my boots most boots I've tried I can wear out in 6 months fully wear out the best boot I've found for the abuse I give it daily have been zamberlan. They're not cheap but they don't lose their form and last forever! 👍🤠👍
 

jimss

Well-Known Member
Joined
Mar 30, 2013
Messages
171
I live and work in Colo out if the field year round as well as hunt mostly Colo, Wyo, and Alaska. I've switched pretty much over to Crispis but do use Lowa Tibets in deep snow. The only time (even in the winter) I wear tall boots is in deep snow. I also NEVER wear insulated boots. If I was sitting in a blind for hours each day I might but for hiking and spot/stalk hunting I don't wear them even on the coldest days. I buy my boots around 1 size big so I can add padded insoles. This also allows me to cinch down the laces tight when I wear thinner socks during the summer/warm days and thicker socks on super cold days.

In regard to tall boots....I hate them! Tall boots are heavier, stiffer, and way tougher to stalk game quietly. I've been on 6 Alaska sheep/goat hunts plus 4 sheep and 6 goat hunts in Colo and never used tall boots on steep, rocky terrain. Most quality boots like Crispi have a fairly stiff sole and are plenty good for sidehills with rock. I would much rather have lighter boots because I generally cover a lot of country.

I've tried several Crispi models (Wyo's Dakotas, and recently Monaco's). I use and abuse my boots every day at work and all the Crispis I've owned have worked well. Some are lighter and offer a little more support than others. All leather generally outlast synthetic boots but are hotter during the summer and don't breath as well. Some of the synthetics cheatgrass and cactus can go right through so that may be a concern?

I could go on and on but those are a few things that I find important.
 

Squatch

Well-Known Member
Joined
Aug 10, 2014
Messages
67
Location
North Dakota
Hi All,

My dad and I have an elk hunt planned for the first rifle season in Northern Colorado - we are looking at some higher quality boots and it seems everyone that has Crispi's loves them.

The issue being, I am from PA so there are no Crispi, Kenetrek, etc dealers near us to try the boots on. I am able to find a pair of Crispi Guide GTX's at a local Sportsmans, but they do not have my size. But they seem built extremely well and look durable.

So question being, what model of Crispi boots do you have and are they insulated? I would love to be able to use the boots back here in PA also, so I am leaning towards an insulated pair.

Any insight is appreciated!
Try Scheel.com. Great selection of Crispi and Kenetrek with the best return policy available if they don't fit.
 

brcfo_outdoors

Well-Known Member
Joined
Mar 24, 2020
Messages
405
Location
Left Coast
I have Crispi Cross Over Pro Lights, Briskdal (non insulated), and the new Attiva Mid. If you are looking for a good pair of hunting boots with all the support for a pack, I would seriously consider the Briskdal or the Colorado before anything else. The Briskdal will offer a little more support and the the Colorado will have a little more flex, but both make great all around boots. Both come in insulated and non insulated versions. The coldest I have used my Briskdal in was high 20's/low 30's in a few inches of snow. My feet were dry and warm, but I did start to feel my toes get a little cold sitting in my camp chair next to my truck in the evening. As long as I was moving it wasn't a problem, or if I had some fuzzy camp shoes to switch into at the end of the day.
 

fnlights

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 15, 2021
Messages
162
Location
Pennsylvania
Try Scheel.com. Great selection of Crispi and Kenetrek with the best return policy available if they don't fit.
Good to know. I do like the Scheels exclusive West River 2.0 Gore-Tex 10.

Does anyone have any experience with these boots? They seem to be good quality for $350
 

charliewhisky

Well-Known Member
Joined
Sep 7, 2010
Messages
47
My curren
Your experience must have been different.

I have been wearing Military issue boots on pretty much every continent for the past 29 years of active duty... I would not trade a single pair, issued or not, for my Crispis or my Danners. Not even a chance. Couldn't pay me to do it.
My current pair are Danner authorized for wear.
 
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