Rem 700 bolt ignition improvements?

Blancoalex

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Looking for suggestions on what improvements can be done to factory Rem 700 bolt for consistent primer ignition for better accuracy. Polishing,parts replacement,etc?
20200701_162604.jpg
 

aushunter1

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I dont really understand why you would need to??

Bolts can become siezed/slow up due to grease so if that was happening I would ultrasonic clean all the parts, re lube
using light machine oil & just re assemble.

The is more than likely a stronger spring available if you think it needs it but again never needed one in any of my Rem's
 

MagnumManiac

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Looking for suggestions on what improvements can be done to factory Rem 700 bolt for consistent primer ignition for better accuracy. Polishing,parts replacement,etc?View attachment 201447
The only issue I have ever encountered was the pin that holds to firing pin assembly to the cocking piece kept moving out of place and would bind up the whole thing, especially on the uplift/cocking of the bolt. Just before I tore it all down to find the issue, the bolt was that hard to lift, even empty, I was having to hold the rifle between my knees.

Other than that issue, I have never found the need to polish or tweak anything.
I’ve had a few bushed but that was due to a primer issue.

Cheers.
 

L.Sherm

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Depends on how smooth you want the bolt to operate, take the cock on close out then you lose pin fall which is suppose to hurt consistent ignition, .240 is suppose to be the lowest pinfall #
 
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L.Sherm

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Down around .200 is were you get rid of the cock on close, there is a way to get it back on a factory 700.
 

jd5521

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jrock

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Any modifications I've made to a bolt assembly has been for function more than accuracy improvement. I can't shoot well enough to tell if any changes could make a difference.
 

cohunt

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or
or self contained kit
or if you prefer aluminum
 
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bigngreen

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Get the firing pin hole bushed and in the center, face the bolt face and lugs, get rid of light pins and light springs, fit a new shroud that is on the center line and guides the rear of the pin correctly, polish the ramp and removed much of the notch for smother operation then have the bolt handle timed to the action and reinstalled.
 

Blancoalex

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bigngreen, I found this pic on line to show what you refer to as polishing ramp and notch removal.

Do you have any pics to show fitting the oversized bolt shroud to share. Thanks
20200701_204440.jpg
 

ntsqd

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I like to very gently polish all of the contact surfaces of the firing pin assembly and when possible the bore that it rides in. I also gently radius the leading edges of those surfaces on the FP and the cocking piece. Not the actual cocking face(s), but those surfaces that ride in the bore of the bolt or shroud during the FP's movement. I usually use a Cratex "stone" to do this work on the FP. Note that those surfaces on the FP to be polished include where the spring can touch it, not just where it bears on it.

A coil spring is a torsion bar, it twists as it is compressed and relaxed. Run a Sharpie down one in a straight line while it is relaxed and then compress it and look at your formerly straight line. I know what you'll see, but I've not done it to one of these springs in particular. Also notice how the spring can have 'waves' in it when compressed. If you look at a high cycle FP spring you can see where these waves have worn the high nodes on the bolt's bore.
Given that the FP is fixed & can't rotate I expect there to be some minor rotation of the ends of the spring. It could be that a carefully sized bronze thrust washer between the spring and the FP, or the spring and the shroud, or both, would add some small consistency improvement in the FP's motion. In the same vein, the ends of the spring should be carefully de-burred and polished, particularly the very ends of the wire where the mfg process has no doubt left it a bit rough.

Were I building rifles in small production runs I'd look into having the FP's Superfinished or possibly NiB coated. I doubt either is cost effective for one or two at a time. If Superfinishing it might not hurt to have the spring done too. I'd research that before having it done, but I'd expect a spring to benefit from such work.

Since the Rem cocking motion requires rotation of the bolt shroud's threads in the bolt body I like to lap those threads so that they move smoothly and without any hesitation or grittiness. Same for the cocking surfaces, I like to lap those to each other. And I've been known to lap the primary extraction surfaces.
 

ntsqd

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I *think* Sprinco makes a 700 FP spring too. Couldn't check it from here. Been really happy with their buffer springs and wouldn't hesitate to suggest them.
 

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