Reacquired a Rem 700 30-06

matemike

Well-Known Member
Joined
Mar 24, 2014
Messages
133
Location
South of I-10 in Texas
I recently acquired the first rifle I ever shot a deer with. A Rem 700 BDL in 30-06. That's right, my dear ole Dad is good to me.
Basic info is that it has a OU stamp on the barrel so I'm assuming it is a 1971 production gun. What helps me come to the conclusion (it's not from 2001) is that I know I used it in the mid 90's when I started hunting.

It has not been fired more that a shot or two in the last 25 years. Upon receiving the rifle and inspecting it and firing on some dummy rounds, it seemed like the trigger broke but the firing pin hesitated for a micro second. Basically, I could feel and hear two distinctive clicks. After several dry fires and bolt lifts it started to feel better all around.

Aslo, the bolt release button did not want to allow the bolt to slide out. It took some effort to finally get the button to move enough so the bolt would release. Then, of course, when the bolt was reinserted, the button would not spring back out. The bolt could slide out of the action at any time without having to press the button. Similar to the trigger and firing pin, the bolt release mechanism has begun to work a little more properly.

So my plan with this oldie is to shoot it. I want to keep it looking and functioning as original as possible. I've never owned a Rem 700 and I know the possibilities are endless to aftermarket goodies. But I believe I will refrain. If anything I might open it all up and give it a good cleaning and lube. I bet it needs it.
And if I do that I may just do a bedding job. It does not seem to be free floated. Were rifles even floated back then?

Lastly I might drop in a Timney trigger if this original one doesn't start to feel really good.

Pics to come
 

JMW67

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Joined
Dec 6, 2012
Messages
610
Location
TEXAS
I recently acquired the first rifle I ever shot a deer with. A Rem 700 BDL in 30-06. That's right, my dear ole Dad is good to me.
Basic info is that it has a OU stamp on the barrel so I'm assuming it is a 1971 production gun. What helps me come to the conclusion (it's not from 2001) is that I know I used it in the mid 90's when I started hunting.

It has not been fired more that a shot or two in the last 25 years. Upon receiving the rifle and inspecting it and firing on some dummy rounds, it seemed like the trigger broke but the firing pin hesitated for a micro second. Basically, I could feel and hear two distinctive clicks. After several dry fires and bolt lifts it started to feel better all around.

Aslo, the bolt release button did not want to allow the bolt to slide out. It took some effort to finally get the button to move enough so the bolt would release. Then, of course, when the bolt was reinserted, the button would not spring back out. The bolt could slide out of the action at any time without having to press the button. Similar to the trigger and firing pin, the bolt release mechanism has begun to work a little more properly.

So my plan with this oldie is to shoot it. I want to keep it looking and functioning as original as possible. I've never owned a Rem 700 and I know the possibilities are endless to aftermarket goodies. But I believe I will refrain. If anything I might open it all up and give it a good cleaning and lube. I bet it needs it.
And if I do that I may just do a bedding job. It does not seem to be free floated. Were rifles even floated back then?

Lastly I might drop in a Timney trigger if this original one doesn't start to feel really good.

Pics to come
I bet if you clean it good, float barrel , bed and swap trigger it will shoot sub moa if the barrel is not pitted to bad after all it is an 06 hell it may do it right now
 

26Reload

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Joined
Dec 25, 2016
Messages
2,018
Location
SE Idaho
That looks really nice for a rifle of that age...run your borescope thru and show some pics.....a thorough cleaning and lube...i bet it'll do just what 06's always did.....
 

7stw

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 21, 2010
Messages
1,953
Location
Salisbury Maryland
I recently acquired the first rifle I ever shot a deer with. A Rem 700 BDL in 30-06. That's right, my dear ole Dad is good to me.
Basic info is that it has a OU stamp on the barrel so I'm assuming it is a 1971 production gun. What helps me come to the conclusion (it's not from 2001) is that I know I used it in the mid 90's when I started hunting.

It has not been fired more that a shot or two in the last 25 years. Upon receiving the rifle and inspecting it and firing on some dummy rounds, it seemed like the trigger broke but the firing pin hesitated for a micro second. Basically, I could feel and hear two distinctive clicks. After several dry fires and bolt lifts it started to feel better all around.

Aslo, the bolt release button did not want to allow the bolt to slide out. It took some effort to finally get the button to move enough so the bolt would release. Then, of course, when the bolt was reinserted, the button would not spring back out. The bolt could slide out of the action at any time without having to press the button. Similar to the trigger and firing pin, the bolt release mechanism has begun to work a little more properly.

So my plan with this oldie is to shoot it. I want to keep it looking and functioning as original as possible. I've never owned a Rem 700 and I know the possibilities are endless to aftermarket goodies. But I believe I will refrain. If anything I might open it all up and give it a good cleaning and lube. I bet it needs it.
And if I do that I may just do a bedding job. It does not seem to be free floated. Were rifles even floated back then?

Lastly I might drop in a Timney trigger if this original one doesn't start to feel really good.

Pics to come
That's a great looking rifle, metal work, and wood are near perfect. The sluggish delay, and the bolt release sounds like a gummed up reciever, and associated parts. Years ago, wd40 was common, and its gummed up quite a few over the years.
A good dose of lighter fluid will clean it up, with a little working of the action. Also, you may want to remove the firing pin, and shroud. Inside of the bolt gets gummed up as well. Nice rifle, love the wood.
 

RevJim

Well-Known Member
Joined
Dec 25, 2014
Messages
602
Location
Sandy, UT
I have used many Timneys, but recently I have fallen in love ( I mean the kind of love you daydream about!) with Trigger Tech. The TT Primary goes safely down to 2 1/2 pds or so. I just had a TT Special put in a new Bergara B14 ( a Mod 700 clone) and it goes below two pounds safely. I like 2#. The best part is (a) they don't stop working even if they get filled up with gunk and (b) you can adjust the pull with a little hex wrench yourself w/o taking the rifle out of the stock. Sometimes, in late winter, my old hands get stiff, so I can crank it back up to 3# easy cheesy! Good luck to you and yes, your rifle just needs some TLC! I'm glad for you pard! :)
 

7stw

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 21, 2010
Messages
1,953
Location
Salisbury Maryland
I have used many Timneys, but recently I have fallen in love ( I mean the kind of love you daydream about!) with Trigger Tech. The TT Primary goes safely down to 2 1/2 pds or so. I just had a TT Special put in a new Bergara B14 ( a Mod 700 clone) and it goes below two pounds safely. I like 2#. The best part is (a) they don't stop working even if they get filled up with gunk and (b) you can adjust the pull with a little hex wrench yourself w/o taking the rifle out of the stock. Sometimes, in late winter, my old hands get stiff, so I can crank it back up to 3# easy cheesy! Good luck to you and yes, your rifle just needs some TLC! I'm glad for you pard! :)
I whole heartedly agree on the Trigger teck, and I too have a b14, which I may do the same thing to. Can't go wrong with tt!
 

RevJim

Well-Known Member
Joined
Dec 25, 2014
Messages
602
Location
Sandy, UT
Growing up in East, Tx, I used 3 in 1 Oil "until" the miracle lube WD-40 came out, whoopee! Since my part of Texas rained a ton, it worked as advertised. However...time marches on, and OMG, what a horrible mess it made inside, ha! I loaned an old 11-48 12ga to a friend to hunt ducks. He spends all that time getting to the hot spot ( wood ducks coming into roost) its cold, he broke ice going in (no waders, we were young "men" bless God!) and the shotgun would not fire! ha He brought it home, fussed at me for loaning him "junk". I finally worked up my nerve and decided to drift out the two pins, drop the trigger assembly ( I had never done that before then, well duh ha) and it was a grey paraffin looking mess. Gasoline, screwdriver as a probe and a toothbrush fixed it. Now, I really, really like Outers Tri Lube , ha. It does the same water displacement but finishes off better, way better! :)
 

19elkhunter51

Well-Known Member
Joined
Dec 18, 2008
Messages
148
I had a very similar experience with a Rem 700. A friend of my brother in law died with a collection of guns. He didn't shoot any of them over the last twenty years. When I got the list of weapons that his wife was selling the only thing of interest to me was a Rem 700 in .243. I figured that for the $300.00 I could always get my money back if I didn't like it.
When I took possession of the rifle I put it in the safe until I had a chance to shoot it. That took over two years. When I attempted to pull the trigger I was worried I had purchased a broken rifle. Much like you, it took several attempts to get anything to happen with the trigger, firing pin, bolt release and magazine release. When I took it apart to find the problem it was quite obvious that the rifle had not been cleaned in many years. After a complete cleaning and a trip to the range I am very pleased with the rifle.
I will eventually bed the stock and free float the barrel just to have something to do.
I am amazed at how old gun grease will deteriorate over the years.
 

Stiltsville

Well-Known Member
Joined
May 20, 2020
Messages
182
Location
Florida,USA
There is nothing wrong with the 700 trigger. There are instructions on the net on adjusting them. As with all enclosed triggers they must be spotlessly clean and run dry. Ditto the bolt, neither need any lube unless you plan to shoot 1000s of rounds per month. Own/owned a ton of 7XX rifles, everyone worked fine if trigger adjusted right and run w/o oils (that always gum up). The only thing wrong with thw Walker trigger are the nuts behind the bolts.
 

Arkansasdad

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 26, 2014
Messages
68
I recently acquired the first rifle I ever shot a deer with. A Rem 700 BDL in 30-06. That's right, my dear ole Dad is good to me.
Basic info is that it has a OU stamp on the barrel so I'm assuming it is a 1971 production gun. What helps me come to the conclusion (it's not from 2001) is that I know I used it in the mid 90's when I started hunting.

It has not been fired more that a shot or two in the last 25 years. Upon receiving the rifle and inspecting it and firing on some dummy rounds, it seemed like the trigger broke but the firing pin hesitated for a micro second. Basically, I could feel and hear two distinctive clicks. After several dry fires and bolt lifts it started to feel better all around.

Aslo, the bolt release button did not want to allow the bolt to slide out. It took some effort to finally get the button to move enough so the bolt would release. Then, of course, when the bolt was reinserted, the button would not spring back out. The bolt could slide out of the action at any time without having to press the button. Similar to the trigger and firing pin, the bolt release mechanism has begun to work a little more properly.

So my plan with this oldie is to shoot it. I want to keep it looking and functioning as original as possible. I've never owned a Rem 700 and I know the possibilities are endless to aftermarket goodies. But I believe I will refrain. If anything I might open it all up and give it a good cleaning and lube. I bet it needs it.
And if I do that I may just do a bedding job. It does not seem to be free floated. Were rifles even floated back then?

Lastly I might drop in a Timney trigger if this original one doesn't start to feel really good.

Pics to come
Don't do any work on it, as an heirloom it is worth more than gold. If your Dad is still with you spend time with him, he wont be here forever. As far as the rifle goes that era of production of Remingtons was great and most of those would shoot better than most people's abilities. I buy guns and these are the production years I look for. If you want to work on a rifle buy one to hot rod. In the future you will look at that rifle and think of your Dad, that is worth more than any rifle you can buy. Happy shooting.
 

arch408

Well-Known Member
Joined
Dec 6, 2012
Messages
228
Definately an older rifle, but in really good shape. The checkering is the impressed style. They went to cut checkering about thirty years ago. I agree that the bolt and trigger need a good degreasing and cleaning. I own several M700's with the old and new style triggers. I've never had any problems with either one and I'm not about to send all my M700's to a "qualified" gunsmith to swap out the old triggers for the new style. I'll put in Timney triggers before I will pack them all up and ship them to a repair center.
 

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