Opinions- Front and rear support for hunting

Bang4theBuck

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Nov 19, 2013
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421
While I have been hunting for over 30 years, I am taking my first Mule Deer trip, in the mountains of WY in a couple of months. I am all about shooting as supported as possible, both front and rear. I have made other inquiries about gear that I thought I had squared away and have actually learned a bunch form the feedback that I got.

So, what have you guys found to be the most versatile for front and rear support of the rifle? I don't expect any crazy long shots, but even at 400 yds, without good support, it's pretty easy to miss. I don't want to count on being able to lay down prone, but that may end up being the case. We are packing in and out of this hunt and will be on horses, so weight and packability will be a consideration. I am already planning to have my tripod with me for extended glassing periods.

Pictures and links to your favorite arrangements would be very helpful. Thanks.
 

Mark @ Exo

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Apr 25, 2020
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Here to Learn...
My favorite supports for shooting in the field are my pack (prone, sitting, kneeling), the Spartan bipod (prone), and Wiser Precision Quick-StiX for my trekking poles (sitting and kneeling). Pair that with my "eyes" to find natural supports and positions in the field.

Practice figuring out which supports work best (for you personally) is worth the time. Even at home, while dry-firing. I have wasted too much time getting into supported positions in the past, so I have been focusing on assessing a shot opportunity, deciding which support is best, and having the experience on how to best deploy and set up a solid shooting position with the chosen support.
 

waspocrew

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Mar 16, 2014
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911
When able, I prefer prone shots either with my bipod if across my pack. For rear support, I can usually tuck my bino harness under the butt of the rifle. Otherwise, I’ll even carry a cheap bag or sock full of air soft pellets to use for support. If brush is too high or unable to lay prone, shooting sticks are great. You can buy or just make your own. I find I’m fairly stable with sticks as well. My hunting pack has a pretty rigid frame as well that also serves as a more elevated rest from the sitting position.
 
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FEENIX

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Dec 20, 2008
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14,289
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Great Falls, MT
While I have been hunting for over 30 years, I am taking my first Mule Deer trip, in the mountains of WY in a couple of months. I am all about shooting as supported as possible, both front and rear. I have made other inquiries about gear that I thought I had squared away and have actually learned a bunch form the feedback that I got.

So, what have you guys found to be the most versatile for front and rear support of the rifle? I don't expect any crazy long shots, but even at 400 yds, without good support, it's pretty easy to miss. I don't want to count on being able to lay down prone, but that may end up being the case. We are packing in and out of this hunt and will be on horses, so weight and packability will be a consideration. I am already planning to have my tripod with me for extended glassing periods.

Pictures and links to your favorite arrangements would be very helpful. Thanks.
I have a Harris bipod that can transition from prone to sitting/kneeling. In prone, if I need it, I have a Lil buddy from https://bipodbuddy.com/lb.html

For standing, I have ...

Tripods for shooting.jpg
 

TRG65

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Dec 21, 2017
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281
Like anything else, if you can shoot from a bipod or a pack prone. because of where I hunt, I can see 2 places deer come out prone, but not the 3 main spot. So because of the roll in the ground I use a tripod that clips to my rifle by an ACRA mount. If you want to steady that up, use a primos stick or trekking pole or something to then support the back of the stock, like is in the picture by FEENIX.
 

Greyfox

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Jan 21, 2008
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5,608
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Northeast
I will always try for a shot rested as low to the ground as possible. Over half my LR shots in Wyoming have been from the prone position. At least 1 foot of bipod height(to clear grass) with a rear bag. For more upright positions I carry a set of collapsible shooting sticks that cover from sitting to standing positions. I also have the option of using my backpack for additional support.
 

HFleftyTikka

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Jun 18, 2020
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18
Location
New York
I am old fashion (and old). Many mule deer shot from sitting position using sling - the way we were taught to shoot in the old days.
Definitely agree, I'm 66 and have taken many deer a few antelope, elk and moose and hundreds of fur bearers and small game with nothing more than my sling or pack or other natural objects found in place
 

HFleftyTikka

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Jun 18, 2020
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Location
New York
Definitely agree, I'm 66 and have taken many deer a few antelope, elk and moose and hundreds of fur bearers and small game with nothing more than my sling or pack or other natural objects found in place
Sitting on my butt and using nothing more than my knees and sling is just as or more stable than a lot of shooting benches i've used over the years.
 

Sjspin

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Joined
Dec 22, 2018
Messages
8
Location
Chattanooga, TN
I use a pack up front and rain gear in a small dry bag for the rear. I also use a tripod for glassing with a hog saddle attached for sitting/kneeling/standing. Covers all shots at range, very stable. Worked well for me last year on my mule deer hunt. I have all of except the hog saddle anyway when hunting.
If you use the hog saddle, they have directions on how to use your sling to tension and create stability. It works well, but you need to practice with it.
 

Winkfish

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Joined
Sep 27, 2016
Messages
148
Location
Wisconsin
I have found that a hog saddle attachment to the a tripod works great. However I have been transitioning over to a ARCA rail on the bottom of many of my rifles. This is an example of the hog saddle. This one has a PIC rail on the front so that I can also keep a bipod attached.

20191201_163310.jpg
 

MS660Magnum

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Jun 20, 2020
Messages
41
Location
California
I know it goes against the current paradigm of “get low then get lower,” but for hunting I love the harris s series 12-25 bipod. It’s the one with three section legs and friction locks. At 12” it’s a slight stretch to get up to prone, but very do-able and it’s usually tall enough to get over the grass. For a quick sitting shot though it’s very deadly. Plus, if I need to reposition I just get up and move with the legs down and extended. In fact, I often stalk with the legs down and extended. Then I can get a steady shot as quickly as I can sit down and find the reticle.
 

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