hiking stick

Discussion in 'Backpack Hunting' started by Timber338, Jun 13, 2015.

  1. Timber338

    Timber338 Well-Known Member

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    I've never used a hiking stick, but am considering using one. Does anybody here use one that can also be used as a shooting stick and binocular rest? Any advice and recommendations you can pass along would be appreciated.:cool:
     
  2. just country

    just country Well-Known Member

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    morning, Chinese bamboo fighting stick. found mine at a fea market. the stick is real bamboo. cured will not absorb water, very very durable. I have had mine for 10yrs. get one that fits ur hand. my sticks length is 6ft. good for snakes, do not kill good snakes, stray dogs irate people. very good for self defense, very stable when walking, hiking. I put a steel cap with a spike on one end. I had this cap made by a welder. the spike end can b used for traction. I live in TX. I walk a lot with my dog.

    just countrylightbulb
     
  3. jmden

    jmden Well-Known Member

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    In the end, a good pair of trekking poles will increase your efficiency and decrease wear and tear on your body, probably better than a single pole of some type. Trekking poles can be used in several ways to shoot off of as well, either used together or apart. Put the rifle in the hand loops, a couple of other things.
     
  4. FEENIX

    FEENIX Well-Known Member

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    I don't use them except when snowshoeing but check out Bog-Pod Q-STIK Multipurpose Monopod Shooting Stick 29-1/2 to 68 Kit
     
  5. J E Custom

    J E Custom Well-Known Member

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    +1

    Two poles are better than one because they add to your balance in rough terrain and assist in climbing. you can find some inexpensive ones at Wal-Mart for less than $20.00 dollars to try and if you like them I am sure that you can find some better ones.

    J E CUSTOM
     
  6. 7magcreedmoor

    7magcreedmoor Well-Known Member

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    I use Black Diamond flick-lock trekking poles. They won't break the bank, and have held up very well so far. They have a carbide spike tip, which I have covered with (sold separately) a rubber knob cap for hard surface/summer hiking, and also come with snow baskets for deep stuff. I use them hiking and snowshoeing, loop the wrist straps and cross the sticks as shooting sticks for sitting and kneeling shots (so far I've been able to make that work at 700 yards). If you hunt with a partner and you each have them, putting both pairs together is similar to the "quad-sticks" that Len is now offering on this site. You'll need to practice that trick well before you need to use it on game. A single stick can steady my bino pretty well for a quick look, but for prolonged glassing this will never beat the use of a tripod.
     
  7. Timber338

    Timber338 Well-Known Member

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    Thanks guys, I'll check out trekking poles and the bog-pod. I can definitely see how two sticks would be nice, but not sure I want two poles. Great idea to get a cheap pair and try them out on some scouting trips before I buy something more expensive.
     
  8. phorwath

    phorwath Well-Known Member

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    Trekking poles (2) are helpful with a heavy backpack. I wouldn't have made it out with the sheep in my backpack last fall if I hadn't been using my hiking poles. The older you are, the more helpful they are.
     
  9. jmden

    jmden Well-Known Member

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    These are what I'm using at the moment and they've held up well under much hard use (abuse) for two seasons in the mountains:

    Causeway Trekking Poles | Helinox The GL 145 in particular. I've not found the spring loaded poles to be necessary or helpful (just me) and the mechanism adds extra weight, complexity and cost to the poles. I also don't care for flip lock poles as the bulk of the mechanism is forever getting caught in brush/branches you may have to go through for a bit and I've had these get 'flicked' open unknowingly. The GL 145 is the lightweight workhorse with a top weight rating of 300lbs, which I've been over with a 130lb pack before. Check out the weight ratings because many of these are not rated for a guy with big loads that might be the case for hunters more than hikers with light packs. The GL stands for Groove Lock and the poles can be locked in the grooves (see pic) to provide an incredibly secure lock. Some of these poles without a groove lock type function can slip and collapse in length when you need them most--most likely to happen in wet conditions. The GL has not done this too me in some very nasty conditions where other top end poles have. Bottom line--these are tough, strong poles (OK--you can break anything) with the latest in metallurgy in poles (Helinox is owned by DAC and if you know DAC, you know what I mean) that collapse to a very short length, are very lightweight, lock the pole sections together very securely and without the extra bulk, weight, and problems I've had with flick locking pole sections.

    Trekking poles (2) can be crossed at the top of them and have your rifle rest where they cross thereby forming a very quick, very adjustable rest for your rifle. My only regret is not using them many years earlier than I did.

    One other thing I do to save weight and bulk is to take any kind of basket at the bottom of the pole off. Never needed it while hunting or hiking yet. I have them available at the car and I'd have to be in 12" or so of snow before I think I'd bother with them. For me, 99% of the time, they are just in the way.
     
  10. HARPERC

    HARPERC Well-Known Member

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    Thanks Jon! I've been using the Sherlite Staff for a long time, and when I've looked I haven't found anything that adjust and locks to my satisfaction.

    I also prefer a bit more height than even the staff I have offers. 57" I think. We used to use ski poles hunting winter cats, being a bit self taught am I looking at the 2 poles vs 1 in the wrong way, and what are your thoughts on length?
     
  11. yobuck

    yobuck Well-Known Member

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    Ski poles with the circular devices on the lower part removed work well for me for
    walking. I also use a Cabelas collapsable hiking/shooting stick which works well for
    glassing and reasonably well for shooting with the attachments included with it.
    But i prefer the flea market ski poles for walking.
     
  12. Epee

    Epee Well-Known Member

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    Look up Luxury Lite, they make a carbon fiber hiking staff that they gurantee for life from breakage.

    I love mine, and have used it for hiking in rough mountain desert terrain. It has held up for 7 years with no issues.
     
  13. jmden

    jmden Well-Known Member

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    I purposely stayed away from carbon last time I purchased poles. Had too many friends that, wacking through rocks on some nasty x-country trek high in the mountains, the carbon poles get beat so bad that frayed carbon is showing. The best aluminum for this purpose (DAC/Helinox) still get beat up a bit, but it just seems to hold up a bit better. But, as with most things...whatever works for you.

    The GL145 is a long, long stick fully extended, something I was looking for in some of my 45 degree down angle, nasty x-country treks with 95+ pound packs. Sometimes, with that kind of weight in really tricky steep downhill conditions, it is incredibly important to be able to extend that pole a long, long ways to be able to plant it on something secure and help you get down/over and obstacle that would be very unsafe otherwise. In that kind of situation, one can only imagine, with that kind of weight on that kind of slope, what would happen if pole sections collapsed at that point in time. The Groove Lock has not failed me yet and they are a very sleek, strong pole that doesn't get caught on stuff as you go by. One particular hunt I do every year I can't imagine doing without very good trekking poles.
     
  14. Timber338

    Timber338 Well-Known Member

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    One thing that is tough in finding the right pole is that I"m 6'4" tall... In years past I often times will bring sticks home with me that I just picked up off the forest floor and used, and the ones that I like the best are very long, upwards of 65+ inches...

    Jmden, very much like you described, reaching down while hiking down a very steep hill, and a lot of length in the pole is great to have. I definitely want to get the longest pole that I can find. I'm looking at the GL145 and a few of the others you all have mentioned. I think the #1 thing I'm looking for is durability, so I'll have to look over all these choices.

    Overall it sure sounds like it's nice to have two poles... what do you guys do with the poles when you're stalking through a forest with your rifle in your hands? Do you collapse the poles and tie them onto your packs?