g7 br2 rangefinder vs Leica rangefinder

paulatherton21

Well-Known Member
LRH Team Member
Joined
Feb 16, 2015
Messages
1,818
Location
Mapleton Depot, PA
I'm torn between buying a g7 br2 rangefinder and using custom g7 turret... or maybe using moa?? Or buying a Leica rangefinder and using a kestrel 4500 applied ballistics program for dope... I'm kinda new to long range... any input would b appreciated.... I want the easiest long range system that is accurate... I know g7 doesn't factor in spin drift and corolis effect... and kestrel figures out everything... please give me some feedback.. thank you
 

406precision

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jun 23, 2013
Messages
492
Location
South West Montana
I'd run the Leica and the ab kestrel...we've been running the ab kestrel for over a year and if the right inputs are entered you can take the correction to the bank. Pair the ab with a wrist coach type arm guard and you've got a very reliable and accurate system. I personally use a vextronics 15 with the ab kestrel and have never been disappointed..do your self a favor and start with a blue tooth model from the get go.
As far as the g7 is concerned it is a nice system, but I prefer the ab kestrel

[email protected]
 

Attachments

  • 20150505_072935.jpg
    20150505_072935.jpg
    119.8 KB · Views: 55

406precision

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jun 23, 2013
Messages
492
Location
South West Montana
It takes several steps to do it properly, but regardless of which system you use the only way to verify your velocity or data is to go out and shoot. I would not rely on a chronograph and a ballistic calc your going to need real world data.

I prefer to shoot from 100-1200 and plot my results you can than use this info to create a ballistic profile and start to refine your results.

I make a minimum of three trips to the range to verify my dope and am constantly refining the information.

Ballistic calculators are very effective tools, but you only get out of them what you put in...ie.. garbage in garbage out.

[email protected]
 

Greyfox

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 21, 2008
Messages
5,715
Location
Northeast
For hunting under 1200 yards, my choice is the G7. Spin drift(and coreolis) is an easy mental correction at 1000-1200 yards. Comparing my G7 to my Vectronix/Kestrel out to this range, my corrections between the two match. The G7 is much faster, easier and has been a proven performer for me for three seasons. IMHO.
 

Greyfox

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 21, 2008
Messages
5,715
Location
Northeast
I'd be using for hunting.. wouldn't shoot past 1200 @ big game.. That's why I was leaning towards g7

This is the sweet spot for the G7. It's the perfect set up for my approach to long range hunting. I want the capability to make an accurate long range shot, but in reality, I can have shots at any range. While I have successfully taken a few animals past 1000 yards with the G7, I have taken a couple of dozen at ranges between 500 and 1000 yards. Several good animals I have taken may have been "no shots" if I had to take the time using multiple devises in preparation for a shot. The mature whitetail bucks, in particular, don't give you much time when the opportunity presents itself. IMO.
 

Greyfox

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 21, 2008
Messages
5,715
Location
Northeast
Do u use g7 turret or moa??

My turrets on my NF G7 and Huskemaws have both yardage and MOA on the same turret. I mostly use the MOA scale but either one has worked well for me out to 1000 yards. Over that range I use the MOA scale exclusively for a more precise setting on the shot.
 

Russbouv

Well-Known Member
Joined
Apr 5, 2014
Messages
48
My turrets on my NF G7 and Huskemaws have both yardage and MOA on the same turret. I mostly use the MOA scale but either one has worked well for me out to 1000 yards. Over that range I use the MOA scale exclusively for a more precise setting on the shot.

Can you post a pic of your Huskemaw turret with both yardage and MOA scales on it.. Or a link to one like it.?? That's what I want for mine.
 

Recent Posts

Top