Dry graphite neck lube for seating bullets?

Hugnot

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Back to the future, like 10 years. Lubing the insides of necks with cold graphite might make for easier bullet seating. On the OAL measurements, taking the measurement at the ogive to the base of the case would provide more uniform distances from ogive to leade but a measurement to allow pointy bullet rounds to fit inside magazine would be separate.

Graphite is a form of carbon, it has lubricating qualities but is not stable at high temps and loses lubrication qualities when hot and has been shown to corrode stainless steel after chemical alteration. I use graphite free 3-IN-ONE lock dry lube applied with a Q tip.
 

Sockeye66

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I rub a little dry graphite on my case neck brush before sizing. Seems to work well, but there’s certainly other products that work well too.
 

dok7mm

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west texas
Back to the future, like 10 years. Lubing the insides of necks with cold graphite might make for easier bullet seating. On the OAL measurements, taking the measurement at the ogive to the base of the case would provide more uniform distances from ogive to leade but a measurement to allow pointy bullet rounds to fit inside magazine would be separate.

Graphite is a form of carbon, it has lubricating qualities but is not stable at high temps and loses lubrication qualities when hot and has been shown to corrode stainless steel after chemical alteration. I use graphite free 3-IN-ONE lock dry lube applied with a Q tip.
I don't doubt there may be some minute amount of corrosion due to graphite in the barrel, but not near the corrosion that results from powder residue on firing.

It would be tricky to resolve which could be the culprit, but I would assume the larger charge of powder vs the tiny amount of Dry Imperial in the neck.

The carbon residue in fired necks has long been used to lube the neck for bullet seating (often passing a brush thru the neck to remove the coarse residue).

I anneal every firing and the AMP temperature definitely changes the texture of neck residue, so I spin a brush in each neck after resizing, lube the neck with the Q-tip, run a mandrel to set neck, charge and seat bullets.

Works well for me, but "to each his own".
 

Tac-O

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Utah
I used to use a tiny bit of Lee lube on my neck brush, but then saw from Alex wheeler that the best velocity spreads he's ever gotten was from just brushing the neck and leaving the carbon residue in, no lube.

So I started doing that because I don't want an extra step of lubing! It does work really well.

I know the imperial dry lube is supposed to help decrease spreads, I just don't know why it made mine way worse.
 

ButterBean

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West Terre Haute Indiana
I used to use a tiny bit of Lee lube on my neck brush, but then saw from Alex wheeler that the best velocity spreads he's ever gotten was from just brushing the neck and leaving the carbon residue in, no lube.

So I started doing that because I don't want an extra step of lubing! It does work really well.

I know the imperial dry lube is supposed to help decrease spreads, I just don't know why it made mine way worse.
Stay tuned as this is gonna be my next video
 

Varmint Hunter

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Dec 26, 2001
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Long Island, New York
I'm in the Alex Wheeler camp on this one. I use a dry bronze brush for a quick pass inside the neck to remove excess fouling or abrasive residue. The black carbon all remains and is slick enough for reseating bullets. It's only on the occasion that I need to drag an expander ball up through a tight neck (like the 458SOCOM) that I lube necks for sizing and generally don't remove whatever residual lube is still in the neck afterwards.
 
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