Documenting/Recording your shots

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Jan 17, 2015
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235
Location
Louisville
Do any of you guys keep a personal notebook of your range time on a consistent basis? I've heard it's helpful, I've heard it's useless, and I know there are a bunch of different ways to do it but never really gave it much thought.

I've always done it during load development to keep track of which loads work, accuracy, muzzle velocity, etc. but I kinda forget about it once I'm done with ladder testing. So which of you guys do it on every shot you take? Only during load development? Only on new rifles? Sometimes? Never?

I get that it helps to document the number of shots down the tube, where you're missing, and what's working for you, but are there other benefits of doing it? Just looking for some opinions and insight.
 

406precision

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Jun 23, 2013
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492
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South West Montana
If you don't document your rounds down range how are you refining your shooting both in data and technique.

I document each shot, where it impacted , what my correction was, wind call etc...after several outings you can use this data to refine your shooting, reloading, and dope charts.

[email protected]
 
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406precision

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Jun 23, 2013
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492
Location
South West Montana
We start with location,date and environmental standards
then sketch the target and write the distance..correction and wind call. After the shot I draw the impact on the target make corrections to wind calls and dope etc. I do this for every round and distance I shoot.

[email protected]
 

bigngreen

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Nov 24, 2008
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SW Montana
A good resource is Impact Data Books, you can build your own data book for what is relevant to your shooting. I have my books made with reload data, elk, deer and coyote data pages along with cold bore pages and a couple other info pages.

Personally I track every thing during development of a new rifle, then if I'm just putting on some range time I'll document the cold bore, if I'm developing a new hunting area I'll document every round at that location also.
Every hit on any animal is documented along with all the conditions about the shot, then I have a master sheet for each animal that I keep running plot on for each shot that shows the aim point and the impact point so I can track my performance on game also.
 

MOA Chaser

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Oct 5, 2014
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105
One thing I started doing is taking my phone camera and taking a pic of my target and group. I make sure to put a tape measure or ruler in the pic or you can record the data and give it a reference number, like take a Sharpie and write No 1 on the target and No. 1 in your data log. I use regular sized paper for my target that I have drawn a 1 inch grid on. I make copies as I need them. Sometimes I just write all of the data on the target and then take a pic, download it to my pc, print it out and put it in a binder. Works for me and it is nice to go back and get a visual picture of the target and groups.
 

22-250hunter

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Dec 27, 2014
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69
I mostly just do it when im making loads for now i like taking photos of the targets after i make a group and number my shots like 1-4 in a tight group and single out any flyers and lable if they are my fault or whatever the case was that way i can study them and compare and decide what load i liked better
 

bill123

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Jun 14, 2013
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620
I photograph each target w/ an iPhone. Photos are stored in iCloud so I can access them on phone and computer. Information written on target includes: date, environmental data and short description of the purpose of the shooting session (if any). I photograph because I don't want to bother tracking shots on a separate piece of paper.

If I need to record more information (which I usually do), I store it in Evernote, a note taking app that synchs between computer & devices. In that, I include date (to cross reference w/ photos), Brass lot (# of firings & weight range), # of rounds, goal of session, hand loading specs (charge eight, primer, seating depth) & short summary of the session.

I don't like traditional data books because I never know when I want to plan or analyze my shooting and like to have the data w/ me all the time.
 

C.O. Shooter

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Jul 20, 2011
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2,539
Location
Pennsylvania
I have a small notebook which I record:
Date, time, location, conditions, altitude, temperature, group size, adjustments, round count, and cleaning regiment. Also record targets (Pictures) on my iPhone.
 

Jeremyc

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Oct 13, 2014
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260
I try to record everything in a notebook and in One Note. I take pictures and put it in One Note as well as cutting out targets and putting them in a 3 ring binder
 
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