Spotting your shot

Discussion in 'Long Range Hunting & Shooting' started by klemm, Jan 12, 2019 at 6:16 AM.

  1. klemm

    klemm Well-Known Member

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    What are you guys doing to Spot your shots in a hunting situation. I am hunting in a beanfield, and just wondering what you guys were doing if you happen to miss. Do you guys watch your trace? Kind of a stupid question but I was wondering if there was any info that I am missing
     
  2. AZShooter

    AZShooter Well-Known Member

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    Nice to have a spotter. Other than that, shoot with both eyes open to watch after the shot. Some here have reported they can see the impact with a muzzle brake on their rifles.
     
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  3. Capt RB

    Capt RB Well-Known Member

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    You need a good brake on a deer rifle. You also need good shooting form to control your recoil. Spotting your hits means being on your intended target after the trigger break and before the time of flight to the target.
     
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  4. Korhil78

    Korhil78 Well-Known Member

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    If you are trying to spot by yourself, there is no other better way than to have a good muzzle brake like Cap said. I shot a wild pig with my 6.5 Sherman the other day at 670 yards. I had two guys with me so they were spotting as well but I was able to watch the pig fall to the ground as the bullet hit.
     
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  5. Rich Coyle

    Rich Coyle Well-Known Member

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    Last season I shot two deer with a seven pound rifle that duplicates a .264 Win mag for performance and recoil. I saw the buck about fifty yards away take the hit. The scope was on 4 1/2X. Later I saw the doe fall before the scope moved off her. The scope was set on 16X for the 218 yard shot. Brakes work!
     
  6. oldfortyfiveauto

    oldfortyfiveauto Well-Known Member

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    Setting your scope to too high of power also makes very hard to spot the shot. I rarely run over 16x shooting prairie dogs even with my heavy weight barrels.
     
  7. ctw

    ctw Well-Known Member

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    I have a weatherby accu mark in the .30-378 with the muzzle brake installed. When I shoot deer or water jugs at varying yardages; I see it all unfold in the scope. First time I never needed a spotter. The brake on the .30-378 weatherby Has really spoiled me. So much that I had a brake installed on a weatherby vanguard in the .270 wsm. To me there amazing. Except for the muzzle blast, hearing protection is definitely required. ctw
     
  8. Capt RB

    Capt RB Well-Known Member

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    +100 on hearing protection for every shot. I have a few different electronic muffs (I teach pistol classes) I use them while hunting and wish I started that 30 years ago instead of a few years ago.
     
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  9. yobuck

    yobuck Well-Known Member

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    All of the above is good info. A brake is pretty much a must have for spotting your own hits, especially with heavier recoiling guns. Best advice for serious hunting though is to have a spotter sitting behind you.
    Following the trace can be a double edge sword however. Seeing the hit is the important thing, the trace will clue you in as to where it will take place, but don't get locked in on that, you need to be watching for both, BUT, especially the hit.
    Wind can dissipate the trace also, especially at longer distances, and at extreme distances you wont be following it all the way to the target, as you will usually lose it at the apex of the trajectory.
    Another thing trace watchers are famous for is telling the shooter his shots are going high.
    You need to turn around and (insist) on knowing if he saw the actual hit.
     
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  10. slv hunter

    slv hunter Member

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    Brakes really work for this. Be sure you don't lift your head as soon as you pull the trigger. Follow your shot through the scope. Takes practice but it is worth the effort.
     
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  11. ctw

    ctw Well-Known Member

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    Follow thru is extremely important no matter what. ctw
     
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  12. aebhunter

    aebhunter Well-Known Member

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    I think that if you are serious about shooting long range, some type of recoil mitigation is a must. I shoot all my guns suppressed now, but ran brakes prior to that. Controlling the recoil through your body position behind the rifle is also important, IF you can do this in a hunting situation. I like to get as low as I can behind the rifle as the situation dictates, and really try to follow through on every shot. There is nothing like being able to spot your trace and your hit on your intended target.
     
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  13. yobuck

    yobuck Well-Known Member

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    Well its been a rare occaission that ive seen the trace while shooting at distance. Frankly I don't even try to see it.
    I concentrate on the target and hits, but not the trace.
    But then we always use a spotter, and thats his job.
    When conditions are good things usually go pretty well. When conditions aren't, best to pack up and leave.
     
    Last edited: Jan 12, 2019 at 11:54 AM
  14. fisherman983

    fisherman983 Well-Known Member

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    a good quality muzzle brake and great shooting form and follow through.. spotting your own hits can be done without a brake, but everything else needs to be perfect. I have done it off a bench but that's not conducive to hunting applications.