375 rum hunting bullet

Ricky C

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Joined
Feb 12, 2019
Messages
94
Location
Fairbanks, AK
Hey, I’m a Barnes bullet guy. I’ve killed a 9ft brown bear with the 270 gr TSX (375H&H) and a 6.6ft black bear with a 235 gr TSX (375 JDJ 15 in TC). The 375 H&H really likes the 250 TTSX, haven’t shot anything with it. I have no doubt it will work to perfection. I recovered the bullets out of both bears and they were the poster bullets for Barnes. Both guns shoot the Barnes very well. The 375 H&H is under MOA with all three weights, but the 250 is at .5 MOA
Good Luck and Take Care, Rick
 

BAKPAKR

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Joined
Apr 24, 2020
Messages
80
Location
Appalachia
Based on how a 338 bullet thread went, thank goodness you are asking for suggestions for “moose to bears type shooting” and not for deer. 😀

I have not used a .375 diameter LRX but, from limited experience with the 200 gr 30 cal LRX and the 127 gr 6.5 LRX, I think they would be really effective. I doubt that you could go wrong with the Hammers either. One issue with using copper bullets is that you might have to change your screen name.
 

calling4life

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Joined
May 22, 2012
Messages
161
Location
Brookston, MN
Bonded lead bullets like the A-Frames, trophy bonded bear claws and the like are excellent, they mushroom more than mono metals like the triple shock, they have a weight forward design, you get great straight line penetration.

I'd go 300gr + with one of those in the 375 myself.

In fact, I run the trophy bonded bear claws in my 458 lott with similar intentions in mind, I run 500 grainers.

Partitions have killed many an animal, as have triple shocks, I'm sure you could have success with them as well. For me, for bigger, meatier, tougher hide, could be charged, perhaps bone first entry, etc... Bonded lead, weight forward, heavy for caliber, this gets you the straight line penetration in a bullet that will hold together and still expand 2x-3x initial diameter.

Triple shocks have failed where tip deformation has occurred, renders them somewhat a tipped FMJ, partitions aren't bonded. Again, I don't know that you're likely to see a failure out of these, but I just decided why risk it myself, if you have to go lead free, then the decision is really made for you.

If I were taking a 375 to Africa for cape buffalo and up, a solid would be in the mix, sub that and a bonded lead expanding bullet, especially given the options of today, heavy for caliber, should have no issues giving the penetration needed while also expanding.

Shrink the animal size and danger level and I might shrink the bullet weight and play with more speed, moose and bear, I'm sticking with my 500gr in my 458 and would run the 300+ in the 375.

And yes, I get that everything has been killed with a 22lr and a bow... use what you wish, it's your life.
 

Rum Man

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Joined
Nov 2, 2017
Messages
1,541
Location
Montana
My buddy put a Remington 375 ultra together with a 30 " McGowen 1/10 twist barrel a t-4 terminator . I can get the exact load data but he is running Re-26 and a 329 gr. Hammer with amazing accuracy! He is on the hunt for a Montana Spring Bear!

Rum Man
 

Blacktailer

Well-Known Member
Joined
Sep 17, 2019
Messages
95
Location
AZ
Triple shocks have failed where tip deformation has occurred, renders them somewhat a tipped FMJ, partitions aren't bonded. Again, I don't know that you're likely to see a failure out of these, but I just decided why risk it myself, if you have to go lead free, then the decision is really made for you.

If I were taking a 375 to Africa for cape buffalo and up, a solid would be in the mix, sub that and a bonded lead expanding bullet, especially given the options of today, heavy for caliber, should have no issues giving the penetration needed while also expanding.


I take exception to the above re Barnes not opening. There has been some anecdotes on this happening but on smaller diameters <30cal. Also most PH's today say there is no reason to shoot solids in a 375 except for elephant. A premium expanding bullet works much better for buff IME.
 

amyjune

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Joined
Mar 22, 2012
Messages
66
Location
So Cal
Hey, I’m a Barnes bullet guy. I’ve killed a 9ft brown bear with the 270 gr TSX (375H&H) and a 6.6ft black bear with a 235 gr TSX (375 JDJ 15 in TC). The 375 H&H really likes the 250 TTSX, haven’t shot anything with it. I have no doubt it will work to perfection. I recovered the bullets out of both bears and they were the poster bullets for Barnes. Both guns shoot the Barnes very well. The 375 H&H is under MOA with all three weights, but the 250 is at .5 MOA
Good Luck and Take Care, Rick
Me, too. Being from Kommiefornia we are required by law to use lead free bullets. I have used Barnes TSX 168gr for my .308 and TSX 140gr in my .270 Win on hogs with excellent results.
 

calling4life

Well-Known Member
Joined
May 22, 2012
Messages
161
Location
Brookston, MN
Triple shocks have failed where tip deformation has occurred, renders them somewhat a tipped FMJ, partitions aren't bonded. Again, I don't know that you're likely to see a failure out of these, but I just decided why risk it myself, if you have to go lead free, then the decision is really made for you.

If I were taking a 375 to Africa for cape buffalo and up, a solid would be in the mix, sub that and a bonded lead expanding bullet, especially given the options of today, heavy for caliber, should have no issues giving the penetration needed while also expanding.


I take exception to the above re Barnes not opening. There has been some anecdotes on this happening but on smaller diameters <30cal. Also most PH's today say there is no reason to shoot solids in a 375 except for elephant. A premium expanding bullet works much better for buff IME.


You buggered up trying to quote me, but I caught it, and here would be the main gent that turned me from them.
Hopefully this quotes correctly from this other website, looks fine to me, but I don't know how it'll post.
Here's a quote from africahunting, a guide, outfitter, prohunter, and hunter.
1 Buff does not quantify a good bullet performance. Sure, they work and they will work most of the time, but I have seen too many failures/inconsistancies with them.

I have taken many buff with clients and also had to sort out situations with charging or disappearing buff on more than one occasion. In order to do this reliably every time I need a bullet I can rely on every time, unfortunately it is not a Barnes TSX.

Barnes TSX would not be my first choice.
Let me elaborate on why Barnes TSX would not be my first choice (for DG) hunting.

Many speak highly of the Barnes TSX and as seen here many report good results with them over a large range of calibers and species hunted. Yes they work and they work better at higher velocities on softer game. They do not work so well on hard skinned game at slower velocities.

Issues and below par performance I have seen or experienced with them are:

1. Being of monometal design they are typically longer than conventional/lead containing bullets of the same weight. This is fine if you use a rifle and caliber with a long enough magazine and action. Bullets can then be seated forward to not reduce case capacity and keep pressures down. This problem is compounded when using them in Magnum cartridges built on standard length actions. High pressures are the main cause of stuck cases/rifle jams while hunting in higher temperature areas.

2. Monometal bullets cause more friction in the barrel and also create more pressure than conventional bullets. Moly Coating helps but TSX are not coated.

3. Monometal bullets(especially copper cause more fouling in the barrel again increasing operating pressures.

4. They are spitzer shape with a slight boat tail, great for long range shooting but not great for close up work in heavy cover. Spitzer designs deflect much easier than more conventional designs. All shots taken will not always be "the perfect shot".

5. The spitzer shape is more prone to deflecting and veering off course after hitting the target.

6. The overall design is of rear weight design(the back is heavier than the front). If the bullet only partially expands(seen this on a few occasions), the rear being heavier and carrying more momentum than the front of the bullet wants to overtake the front and the bullet has no option but to tumble. This severely affects the bullet performance and straight line penetration.

7. Unreliable expansion. They often do not expand or do not expand properly. This again severely affects the performance of the bullet. If it does not expand it tends to over penetrate and exit which can lead to problems if you wound another buff behind the one being shot at.

8. I know the main animal discussed is buff but they are too soft for some applications and too hard for others. They are too hard for cats and too soft when hitting hard shoulder bones eg. shoulder on buff. This again causes either insufficient expansion(vital when hunting cats) or they loose petals when encountering hard bone which defeats the object. I need a soft to punch through, retain the petals and destroy the vitals behind the heavy bone and then settle under the skin on the opposite side.

9. A proper expanding bullet will typically expand to 2.5 x diameter and retain it's petals. The monometal expanders do not achieve this, if they expand as designed you are lucky to get 2 x expansion, most times much less.

For DG back-up you need a bullet that will perform as designed every time you need it to, the ones I have mentioned do so and the one that has been most consistent and devastating for me has been the Rhino.
 

Blacktailer

Well-Known Member
Joined
Sep 17, 2019
Messages
95
Location
AZ
Most of what he says is just plain wrong and does not match my experience with Barnes over the last 25 years. A good portion of what he is talking about is client backup and that is different.
 
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