#1 best tip for new shooters trying to get into the long range game!

Alex Wheeler

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Dont forget that lighting changes like a cloud will move a bullet impact vertically. With as many variables Im amazed at how well we do. If anyone tells you its easy, they dont have much experience.
 

Canhunter35

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Jun 13, 2017
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Dont forget that lighting changes like a cloud will move a bullet impact vertically. With as many variables Im amazed at how well we do. If anyone tells you its easy, they dont have much experience.
how does one calculate lighting changes before they happen? I’ve been duped often on the elr shooting with it often? Dusk and dawn seem when this effect is the most pronounced
 

Alex Wheeler

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If you figure that one out, let us know. I see it often running the line at the 1k BR matches in Missoula. Everyone is sighted in well, then we change targets which takes about 20 seconds. Meanwhile a cloud comes by and everyones groups are a minute high. A 1 moa change can happen at 1k in seconds.
 

Canhunter35

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If you figure that one out, let us know. I see it often running the line at the 1k BR matches in Missoula. Everyone is sighted in well, then we change targets which takes about 20 seconds. Meanwhile a cloud comes by and everyones groups are a minute high. A 1 moa change can happen at 1k in seconds.
Lol that’s what I thought, but wondered if you guys had figured out how to calculate light refraction
 

Overkill338

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Sep 23, 2008
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Virginia
Practice. Practice a lot as much as you can. Even at 100 yards. I notice after a few months of not shooting during my busy season that I lose a lot of trigger control. This time of year I don’t go two days without the range and it’s shows. I have a buddy who really wants to get into long range. I coach him all the time but he only wants to show up twice a year and try and buy his way into taking game at 1000.
I’m really glad he hit the range before going because it crushes his confidence enough to stay within 200 yards. But every year he tries to buy a new rifle that will do it for him.
I'm just beginning myself and I believe you said it all. I'm just trying to learn to read wind accurately.

But there is always somebody that will think they can buy a skill.
 

jgs8163

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Sep 27, 2011
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Looking at some your other posts and the equipment you’ve purchased you appear to be quite up to speed on everything. Looks like you just need to practice at long ranges since you have the short range down. These below are some very nicely equipped rifles you have, nice optics, cans, stocks, actions, etc.... good luck on breaking them in at the longer ranges. That’s a nice short barreled 6.5 Creedmoor you have, is that the Mausingfield action or the Nucleus? Did it come with a man-bun and skinny jeans?
 

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nt7332

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Nov 24, 2016
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Rio Rancho NM
It is a mausingfield. And it did not come with man bun or skinny jeans lol. U have. To send in for those with proof of purchase!
 

jgs8163

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DA1BC156-90C8-497C-B921-508FA2E55A3C.jpeg

It is a mausingfield. And it did not come with man bun or skinny jeans lol. U have. To send in for those with proof of purchase!
I have the nucleus in a very similar setup. No manbun or skinny jeans either.
 

nt7332

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Rio Rancho NM
This windrunner came with skinny jeans and a year of free coffee from the Starbucks. Good for everything except hot coffee and it mush have whip cream on top or offer is invalid lol
1B7F8B7D-6B5B-42D1-A724-5BD94B8798DB.jpeg
 

jgs8163

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They fit on that bipod nicely I’m sure.
 
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SealTeam4

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Jan 11, 2016
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776
Real world practice is key. When shooting paper and steel becomes mundane it’s time to get in the field. Where I live in TX we have a ton of hills and valleys. I’ll go out and place clay pigeons throughout the land scape. It’s a ton of fun! Another thing we do is go hunt little critters like rabbits and prairie dogs at long range.

Joe S

A picture for reference. Funny thing about west Texas. I can drive. Short distance in any direction and be in a totally different type of terrain!
5CD38027-63CA-4749-9661-ADADFC025A52.jpeg
 
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Bull_Mtn

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Joined
Mar 28, 2018
Messages
35
Location
Green Valley, Arizona
Hi all, I have been reading LRH for at least a year or two and just now decided to post to a shooter who wants advice about getting into LR hunting. My Nickname is shootski and I'm not Polish so that can only mean I do two things that are crazy hard at the same time; Cross Country Ski and Shoot. I agree with most of you on most of the advice above but will add one thing to think about based on my experience over 55 years of shooting. The best way to learn the wind is to use a 10 meter World Class Air Rifle at 50 meters. Use the lightest pellet you can find on a natural range with lots of obstacles (terrain) and you can do it even on light wind days. So why the 10 meter air rifle? Because you will probably never shoot anything more accurate! The wind will move that light pellet around as if you were shooting to 1,000 meters and the TOF is about the same. You can use the typical peep and globe sight that they are normally equiped with or you can mount a scope if that's your bag.
OBTW, I believe I hunt long range with a .308 or .458 dead soft lead bullets between 110 and 510 grain Quackenbush Outlaw air rifles shooting to 200 meters at subsonic speeds. What do the readers think of/on that?
If not, I will no longer call myself a long-range shooter.

shootski
I am a airgun benchrest enthusiast. Where I live in S. Arizona, we have a dedicated airgun range, where we can shoot to 100 yds. I average shooting over 10,000 rounds a year. My rifle is a Rapid Air Weapon. .22 caliber. It shoots a 16 gr pellet at 950 fps. The wind at our range can come from all points of the compass, while shooting one target. At 100 yds, the 90 degree wind drift is similar to my .300 WSM at 500 yds. My long range shooting ability has greatly improved because of my airgun experience. I have shot .5 inch groups with my RAW at 100 yds, so it is extremely accurate. When shooting my .300, at long range, I don't think about breath control, trigger control, sight picture and all the other things it takes to make a good shot. It is all automatic, because I do it so many times a year, and it costs me 3 cents a shot.
Hi all, I have been reading LRH for at least a year or two and just now decided to post to a shooter who wants advice about getting into LR hunting. My Nickname is shootski and I'm not Polish so that can only mean I do two things that are crazy hard at the same time; Cross Country Ski and Shoot. I agree with most of you on most of the advice above but will add one thing to think about based on my experience over 55 years of shooting. The best way to learn the wind is to use a 10 meter World Class Air Rifle at 50 meters. Use the lightest pellet you can find on a natural range with lots of obstacles (terrain) and you can do it even on light wind days. So why the 10 meter air rifle? Because you will probably never shoot anything more accurate! The wind will move that light pellet around as if you were shooting to 1,000 meters and the TOF is about the same. You can use the typical peep and globe sight that they are normally equiped with or you can mount a scope if that's your bag.
OBTW, I believe I hunt long range with a .308 or .458 dead soft lead bullets between 110 and 510 grain Quackenbush Outlaw air rifles shooting to 200 meters at subsonic speeds. What do the readers think of/on that?
If not, I will no longer call myself a long-range shooter.

shootski
 

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