Win pre 64 gibbs rifles

Discussion in 'Rifles, Bullets, Barrels & Ballistics' started by WWP2012, Mar 13, 2019.


Help Support Long Range Hunting by donating:


  1. WWP2012

    WWP2012 Active Member

    Messages:
    37
    Joined:
    Jan 3, 2019
    All in all considering 60+ years old it is in remarkably good shape. I could only find 3 spots that need a little attention. The small rust on the end of the barrel, sight, and the slight wear in the bluing over the Winchester stamp. If someone has or could get a high grade stock they could have a 90%+ gun.
     
    Alibiiv likes this.
  2. TJAY

    TJAY Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    217
    Joined:
    Jul 1, 2007
    Mustang72 likes this.
  3. WWP2012

    WWP2012 Active Member

    Messages:
    37
    Joined:
    Jan 3, 2019
    Wholly snikes that’s a lot of money for brass.

    We will likely sell the barrel with the dies on Gun Broker.
     
  4. Turnbolt53

    Turnbolt53 Member

    Messages:
    22
    Joined:
    Dec 18, 2018
    I’m a big 280AI fan, and I think he would be happy going that route.

    But since you’re getting lots of suggestions, I’ll throw one out too

    I would consider putting the 300H&H in a nice McMillan stock (or Echols Legend) for a all around go anywhere one-gun solution. The brass is a little pricey, but not rediculous, and there’s not much you can’t do with a Super 30.

    I wouldn’t go looking for a pre-64 stock. The price of a good one is ridiculous, and the stocks are designed for use with open sights; not scopes.

    Then keep another one (probably the 270) and rebarrel it later if he still wants a 280AI
     
    Last edited: Mar 14, 2019
  5. WWP2012

    WWP2012 Active Member

    Messages:
    37
    Joined:
    Jan 3, 2019
    A McMillan stock / Echols Legend is what he has been gravitating too. The site says he is out of stock on the McMillan. They sure are nice though.

    On keeping the 300, he has shot it once and he said that was one too many. There is a reason that stayed gun stayed in a case for 44 years.
     
  6. Turnbolt53

    Turnbolt53 Member

    Messages:
    22
    Joined:
    Dec 18, 2018
    I understand, but the 300 might (probably would) feel a lot different with a stock that didn’t have so much drop. The H&H is equivalent to the 300WSM, so shouldn’t kick too much worse than. 30-06.
     
    Frog4aday likes this.
  7. WWP2012

    WWP2012 Active Member

    Messages:
    37
    Joined:
    Jan 3, 2019
    That makes sense, but that will be for the next owners.
     
  8. Turnbolt53

    Turnbolt53 Member

    Messages:
    22
    Joined:
    Dec 18, 2018
    Can't go wrong with a good 280AI :)
     
    Frog4aday likes this.
  9. Alibiiv

    Alibiiv Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    498
    Joined:
    Jun 17, 2013
    For me if my grandfather left me a pre-64 model 70 with a work-of-art stock that he made and I was looking at a .280 AI build, I would be looking at rechambering the .270 Gibbs to a .270 AI, or to a .270 Sherman. With the exception of bullet selection, there's not going to be too much difference or any difference between the .280AI and the .270 AI, and less performance than what you will get from the .270 Sherman; elkaholic (on this forum) would help you with the build if you were interested. You could also rebarrel with a contoured barrel chambered in .280AI that will drop in to the stock that the .270 Gibbs is in if that is a must for you. I am nostalgic what I'm thinking is keep one of the rifles original or as close to original, sell the other two and make a nice build with the money that you got for the other two rifles. I have a Remington 700ADL in 30-06 that I bought new for my father (who is now deceased) in the late 60's, it is not a show piece or safe princess by any means, but it is priceless!! As for used Winchester 70 stocks I suggest looking on eBay or Guns International, be patient and be diligent in checking the ads daily and you will find one reasonably. I needed a stock for a Ruger 77 tang safety, long action, after two or three months I found one that was very reasonable and in excellent condition.
     
  10. Alibiiv

    Alibiiv Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    498
    Joined:
    Jun 17, 2013
    If you think that is expensive brass, check out what it will cost you for .280 AI and that's if you can find it; $87 for 50 pieces for Nosler on Brownells.
     
  11. Turnbolt53

    Turnbolt53 Member

    Messages:
    22
    Joined:
    Dec 18, 2018
    You might want to do the math:

    QC 30 Gibbs = $39.59 for 20 = $1.98 ea
    Nosler 280AI = $81.99 for 50 = $1.64 ea (in stock at Midway)

    Or buy Hornady 280AI = 46.99 for 50 = $.94 ea (in stock at Midway)
     
  12. Mustang72

    Mustang72 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    134
    Joined:
    Feb 9, 2019
    Not to mention the cost of rebarreling it. If he doesn't shoot much a hundred rounds of brass would probably last a lifetime. Boyds sells pretty nice laminated stocks for 150-200. Sounds like he is pretty decided on the 280ai and if that's what makes him enjoy the rifle more than go for it. Best of luck
     
  13. WWP2012

    WWP2012 Active Member

    Messages:
    37
    Joined:
    Jan 3, 2019
    I will do load development for him and then load up a hundred. That will likely last him the next 10 years.

    I’m becoming a fan of Nosler brass and that cost spread out over 10 years of hunts is nominal.
     
  14. Mustang72

    Mustang72 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    134
    Joined:
    Feb 9, 2019
    As long as he saves his brass he can get 5-10 loadings depending how hot you run them. At that rate he will never recover the cost of spending a little extra on gibbs brass----but different strokes for different folks. It doesn't have to make financial or performance sense. If that's what he wants then go for it and enjoy.