Why NOT to use super glue on loose primer pockets

royinidaho

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Another lesson learned........:rolleyes:

Loose primer pockets is a PITA.......Stach a bunch of brass hoping that some day a solution will be found. (Still prefer velocity and accuracy to just accuracy:D)

After primers were seated, by thumb, a tooth pick w/just a small drop of super glue (liquid, the gel didn't 'flow') around the edge of the primer seemed to do the trick.

Humph, guess what. The darn stuff flows out onto the case head. I didn't notice this flow until after I did some shooting.

Several cases were very hard to chamber. With all the finesse of a cave man I forced 'em in there..... Not a good thing for hunting loads.........

A study of most of those that were hard fitting showed that the super glue had flowed onto the case head causing the problem.

Any better ideas out there. If the case were belted there is a benchrest shooter that gets 20+ hot loads out of a 300 Win Mag using a little gizmo he machined. I may consider a belted case one of these days.

I will accept no "just reduce the powder a little" solutions.:rolleyes:
 

Johnboy

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Cheraw S.C.
well for me if I had to use glue to hold the primer in.I would just get new brass.but thats me.

but one other thing to look at is that you may never be able to remove the primer again.might be better than primmer stamped in like mil brass.but again for me why do it the brass is telling you a story.its saying let me die or really help me out by swageing the pocket.

but hey this is just an opinion.
 

Boss Hoss

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Roy---seriously I thought you were smarter than that. The chemicals in the Super Glue may not be good for the primer so that will cause inconsistent ignition not to mention residue as you have mentioned. Would also bet that you concentricity of the chambered round was impacted as well.
 

dirtball

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I suppose a little less powder on the initial loads would be OUT OF THE QUESTION???
But then look at the time you are saving by being able to seat primers with your thumb.
Dave
 

J E Custom

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Jul 29, 2004
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Another lesson learned........:rolleyes:

Loose primer pockets is a PITA.......Stach a bunch of brass hoping that some day a solution will be found. (Still prefer velocity and accuracy to just accuracy:D)

After primers were seated, by thumb, a tooth pick w/just a small drop of super glue (liquid, the gel didn't 'flow') around the edge of the primer seemed to do the trick.

Humph, guess what. The darn stuff flows out onto the case head. I didn't notice this flow until after I did some shooting.

Several cases were very hard to chamber. With all the finesse of a cave man I forced 'em in there..... Not a good thing for hunting loads.........

A study of most of those that were hard fitting showed that the super glue had flowed onto the case head causing the problem.

Any better ideas out there. If the case were belted there is a benchrest shooter that gets 20+ hot loads out of a 300 Win Mag using a little gizmo he machined. I may consider a belted case one of these days.

I will accept no "just reduce the powder a little" solutions.:rolleyes:

Roy

There is a tool called a primer pocket swager that will reduce the size and make the primer fit
better that works. It is used on high pressure loads or expensive brass to save money.

The only other solution it to throw the bad brass away. (I know it's hard for some of us).

I never though about the super glue but I tried the primer seal that the military uses and it
worked to get one more loading but I was afraid I would get some leaking primer erosion
on the bolt face and stopped.

If you load hard as you know brass life is short no matter what you do.

J E CUSTOM
 

tackb

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Jun 5, 2007
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178
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england
with your cavalier attitude to safety why not try soldering in the primers or even centre pop around the edge of it ? only on loaded rounds of course !

seriously though , get it rechambered or get a bigger calibre ? running it that hot is not smart really ?

this is the reason we have lots of calibres , using your theorys i might try 50 grains of bullseye in my .308 and see what velocity i get? (i could try and get readings on the bits of my reciever as they whistled past my head?
 

RockyMtnMT

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Roy,

I don't want you to get picked on all by your self, so I will join you. Have done the super glue thing before also. Have not done it much, but it seemed to work fine. Just a tiny bit. And they decapped just fine. I didn't think of this on my own, I'm just not that smart. I learned it here on LRH a few years ago. Tried it out of curiosity to see if it worked, have not made it a practice. I still throw out the brass with loose primer pockets. All though I am mostly using Lapua brass now and can't seem to loosen a primer pocket.:D

Steve
 

tackb

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Jun 5, 2007
Messages
178
Location
england
seriously now, i looked into having my firing pin bushed to stop primer flow with my hotish loads but my riflesmith gave me some good advice 'take the primer flow as an early warning of high pressure' i didn't bother after that ?

you may find that for 50fps less you will get to keep your face? and do you really need every last fps? be honest?

i'm not picking on you i just don't want to read a post about someone who had to give up shooting because they were blinded by a gun coming apart?
 

Boss Hoss

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Hmmmmmm--- let us review here:


THERE IS NO FREE LUNCH when it comes to high pressure loads period. The key here is to accept that fact and move on or experiment with a different brand of brass (I use Lapua for almost everything esp for my wildcat based rounds). When a pocket is a little loose I pitch it but then again all of my brass is bagged and marked to the number of firings.

Friend of mines dad for example who is a reloader not a hand loader has a 6.5 284 that I had Speedy build for him a few years ago. This rifle will shoot .4 with the hunting bullets and the 1st load I tried. He said that is good enough for me --- it is not a hot load however, he has gone up a little on the powder and has some brass that has been shot 10 times and some 1 time (claims it makes no difference).

He wonders why the rifle does not shoot---thought something was amiss so I use my ammo and everything is good again. Just goes to show you that 1 grain more powder and inconsistent neck hardness does make a difference not to mention primer pockets. If the primer pocket is a little loose and a primer backs out just the smallest amount then some of the energy of the pin is used to force the primer back into the pocket thereby giving variable ignition.
 

royinidaho

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Jan 20, 2004
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Blackfoot, Idaho
I noticed another thing, not related to the super glue but to loose primer pockets.

There is a dark ring on the bolt face exactly describing the primer pocket/primer interface. That in and of itself isn't a deal breaker but......

My ejection pin (rem 700) was sticky then finally stuck...... The bearing surface on the pin was pretty gunked up with hardened black stuff......

It looks like it may be better in the long run to trash the brass than suffer long range consequences for the rest of the rifle.

It may be like when I went to the Dr. with a PITA and ending up loosing some dud organs a long ways from that orifice. :D

Boss Hoss I am pretty dumb some times, the first time (this time) was not knowing what you posted. Then second time, this time, was having to find the magnet to scan the floor to find the pin and spring. I figured as it was stuck it was stuck. Yeah, right. However I did use a "proper" punch.

J.E. - I haven't heard much good regarding those primer pocket swages. GG gave them a bad review. The bigger problem is sealing the primer against moisture seepage.
 

phorwath

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Apr 4, 2005
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Alaska
J.E. - I haven't heard much good regarding those primer pocket swages. GG gave them a bad review. The bigger problem is sealing the primer against moisture seepage.

Roy, I PM'd GG after I PM'd you about the primer pocket swage tool. He said he liked the tool. So I bought one based on his opinion. It works reasonably well. They don't turn expanded primer pocket cases into 'like new' again, but they do nurse a few extra reloads from cases with swelled primer pockets.

I probably wouldn't mess with them for cheap brass, but if the brass is expensive or time intensive due to fire-forming or prep work, then I'd say that tool is worth the money.
 

LRSickle

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Jun 8, 2009
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Afognak Island, Alaska
Cut out little circles of duct tape and stick them over the primer to hold them in. Then to thwart any headspace issues, you push your shoulder back the thickness of the duct tape to make up for it. You guys didn't think of that?!?!

I know Roy, I know, I'm a smart *** :D
 

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