Whats your opinion on this setup?

Golovkin

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Quick backstory:

Remington 700 .338RUM I've owned since 2000 (almost 20yrs!), I've killed about a dozen antelope, exactly 17 Elk, and a couple deer with it. I love this rifle, it has a Leupold 4.5 X 14 variX3, A custom two hole muzzle break ( 2 large holes drilled through the last inch of the back bored barrel), and I've replaced the factory synthetic stock with a beautiful wood CDL stock, and

Normally I zero at 300yds and take shots no farther than 450yds, but must shots are on elk in the timber and under 100yards, but sometimes farther.

There are several downsides to my setup and skill set that I want to address.

Recoil: This thing is a thumper, I'd like to tame it down a bit by adding about a lb. of weight to the stock. Adding 8oz. in front of the magazine in the forearm and 8oz near the wrist. (to maintain balance). The whole rig weighs 9lb currently, I'd like it to be 10lb.

Accuracy: Pillar/glass bed the action and float the barrel. Replace the factory trigger and do a speed lock. I've also sent off the scope for a locking zero stop dial so that my 250gr. A-frames can be dialed out to 700yds with the scope.

I'd also like to get a bipod so that I have the option of putting it on when I'm not timber hunting and I plan to practice with it in the field and on the range to see how far I can push my ranges.

Any opinions or advice?
 
My opinions? Not worth too much, but here they are:

Harris SLM bipod.

Talk to a gunsmith about whether the barrle can be threaded for a more effective brake. Make sure the stock is properly fitted to YOU, not a department store crash dummy. A very good fit can also help reduce some perceived recoil. (Made a BIG difference for me, but I have the wingspan of a condor and need a high-rise cheek riser.)

No downside to adding pillars and bedding the action, fully float the barrel. I think that can only help accuracy and consistency. That said, make sure the action bolts are properly torqued. Some long-rangers change the torque on the real bolt to improve accuracy. I haven't tried that on my LR rifle preferring to LokTite Blue the bolts into the action at a little less torque than the max recommended force.

Are you REALLY sure you like that scope better than other options? Especially considering that you want to get into some long range shooting?
 
I would check out maybe doing a newer more efficient muzzle brake rather than adding weight to stock, just me though. And as mentioned previously no harm can come from pillar, and glass bedding stock. Free float that ol girl, and throw you a good timney or similar trigger and I think you will see some improvements. And a torque wrench is your best friend when it comes to LR work. Best of luck brother!!
 
My opinions? Not worth too much, but here they are:

Harris SLM bipod.

Talk to a gunsmith about whether the barrle can be threaded for a more effective brake. Make sure the stock is properly fitted to YOU, not a department store crash dummy. A very good fit can also help reduce some perceived recoil. (Made a BIG difference for me, but I have the wingspan of a condor and need a high-rise cheek riser.)

No downside to adding pillars and bedding the action, fully float the barrel. I think that can only help accuracy and consistency. That said, make sure the action bolts are properly torqued. Some long-rangers change the torque on the real bolt to improve accuracy. I haven't tried that on my LR rifle preferring to LokTite Blue the bolts into the action at a little less torque than the max recommended force.

Are you REALLY sure you like that scope better than other options? Especially considering that you want to get into some long range shooting?

Thanks for the input! I'm open to upgrading scopes, what would you recommend?
 
I sure like all of my 338 Rums !
Just working on a load for the Proof barreled one today .
My factory stock Bdl deluxe Rum has a Bell & Carlson stock with aluminum bedding block . Its fun to shoot with the Horanady 285 eldm and H-1000.
It has a timney trigger and it feels great ! I put a 20 moa base and a set of Burris rings I had and a Trijjicon 5 x 20 x50 with zero stop ! 40 moa of adj .for the long shots . Oh it has a Radial brake also ..

My thoughts are yes fix that girl up ! You will have a hard time beating a 338 Rum !!

RumMan
 
I wouldn't look at adding weight until you check out new muzzle brakes. There are several out that will reduce your recoil by nearly forty percent. Look into three or four port brakes or shoot a friend's or someone's at a range.
 
Weight will only throw the rifles balance off and add unnecessary weight to a hunting rifle. A good muzzle brake will reduce recoil far more that the same weight does.

I looked through our muzzle brake test and found this.
A 8.0 pound 338 recoil has 49.2 ft/lbs recoil with factory loads.
Adding .5 pounds will reduce the recoil to 46.4 ft/lbs of recoil. (A difference of 2.8 ft/lbs.

Our test brake reduced recoil to 15.0 ft/lbs recoil for a total reduction/removal of 34.2 ft/lbs with the brake.

So going from 49.2 lbs of recoil to 15.0 recoil makes a muzzle brake a much better option in my opinion. All muzzle brakes are not equal, but they will all reduce the recoil more that 2.8 lbs.

Couldn't find the Video for this test but here is a similar test using a 338/378 in a heavier rifle that will show the improvement.



J E CUSTOM
 
Last edited:
Weight will only through the rifles balance off and add unnecessary weight to a hunting rifle. A good muzzle brake will reduce recoil far more that the same weight does.

I looked through our muzzle brake test and found this.
A 8.0 pound 338 recoil has 49.2 ft/lbs recoil with factory loads.
Adding .5 pounds will reduce the recoil to 46.4 ft/lbs of recoil. (A difference of 2.8 ft/lbs.

Our test brake reduced recoil to 15.0 ft/lbs recoil for a total reduction/removal of 34.2 ft/lbs with the brake.

So going from 49.2 lbs of recoil to 15.0 recoil makes a muzzle brake a much better option in my opinion. All muzzle brakes are not equal, but they will all reduce the recoil more that 2.8 lbs.

Couldn't find the Video for this test but here is a similar test using a 338/378 in a heavier rifle that will show the improvement.



J E CUSTOM

Wow!
 


I ran the numbers using your actual rifle weight and this is what it should be.

Recoil without brake.
9.0 pounds = 43.8
10.0 pounds = 39.4

With the test brake.
13.3 ft/lbs recoil.

The heaver rifle reduced the recoil 4.4 ft/lbs over the 9 pound rifle. the brake would reduce it by 69.6 % for a total reduction of 30.5 ft/lbs.

J E CUSTOM
 
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