What’s your 600 and 800 yard group? Let’s see some

Lonnie Pendleton

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Joined
Feb 19, 2019
Messages
66
Location
Arizona
Like a light switch.

well happy it’s there. Actually dropping the powder a bit to see if the SD improve but 3shots were covered by a dime (Canadian dime if that matters 😝)

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· t1Splmo1n snorhergasogd ·

What is the greatest rifle shot ever made by an American marksman in battle? Journalist Thomas Powers asks this provocative question in a recent magazine article. Powers offers a good candidate: the shot made by Billy Dixon in 1874.
On June 27, 1874, during the Second Battle of Adobe Walls in northern Texas, Dixon shot a Comanche warrior off his horse at a distance of 1,538 yards, a distance just under a mile. Dixon, a scout and Buffalo hunter, used a 50-caliber Sharps rifle to kill the brave. The Indian fighter regarded his shot as lucky - it was “a ‘scratch’ shot,” he wrote, i.e., a chance shot.
The battle pitted several hundred Native Americans – Comanche, Cheyenne, Arapahoe, and Kiowa – against a couple dozen buffalo hunters. The Indians withdrew immediately upon seeing the result of Dixon’s shot, according to sources. And for evermore Billy Dixon was a legend.
Dixon was born in 1850 in western Virginia. Orphaned at age 12, he lived with his uncle in Missouri for a year or so, and developed a burning desire to see the Great Plains region west of the Missouri River – its fantastically abundant game, its magnificent vistas, its Indian warriors riding free as the wind. At age 13 he departed his uncle’s home and headed west, not even saying “goodbye” for fear of being stopped.
He found work in Kansas as an ox driver and mule skinner, meanwhile developing his shooting skills. By age 20 he was a successful buffalo hunter, selling hides for a couple of bucks apiece. He shot so many buffalo that at times he employed as many as five skinners.
Dixon became a quintessential man of the Old West – tough as nails (he supposedly was never sick a day in his life until old age), taciturn (“uncommunicative at all times,” recalled his buddy Bat Masterson), and eager for adventure.
His love of excitement is a main theme of his memoir, dictated in 1913 to his wife, Olive, as he lay dying. He speaks wistfully of the Great Plains region, “its freedom, its dangers, its tax upon strength and courage,” which gave “a zest to living especially to young men, unapproached by anything to be found in civilized communities.” He added, “The heart swells with emotion at remembrance of the wild, free life along those old trails.” (Clearly he wasn’t uncommunicative anymore. Or perhaps Olive did some embellishing.)
He was a man of contradictions. He respected and empathized with native people even though he killed a fair number of them: “That the Indian should have resisted with relentless and increasing ferocity every effort to drive him from this paradise was natural and justifiable from his point of view.” And he seems to have been a bit of an environmentalist even though he bagged bison and buffalo by the trainload: “Many of us believed and hoped that the wilderness would remain forever.”
In September, 1874, Dixon participated in the Buffalo Wallow Fight in Texas, winning the Medal of Honor for his actions, making him one of only eight civilians ever to receive the award. His medal was revoked by the federal government in 1916-17 because he was a civilian – the government did a major housecleaning of Medal of Honor recipients during this period, rescinding a good many of the decorations.
Dixon’s medal, however, was restored in 1989.
The legendary Billy Dixon died of pneumonia in 1913 at his home in western Oklahoma.
His memoir was published the following year and is still in print as “The Life of Billy Dixon.” “Few books,” says one reviewer at Amazon.com, “capture the spirit of the American West so well.”
 

Matthappens

Member
Joined
Oct 15, 2015
Messages
21
Location
Canada
Hi, from New Zealand! I was shooting a fairly new custom 65-284 last weekend and got a 2 1/2 three shot group at 543 metres. 50 odd rounds down the tube.
I shoot off a bipod and bag but this time it was a jacket for the rear rest.
My 18 year old son shot a group just under 3” 20 minutes later at the same distance using my rifle.
Load is 130 VLDH 51.5gr ADI 2209 which is the H4350. @ 3025 FPS. Waiting for the barrel to shift gears as cut rifle barrels usually do and see another 100 FPS or thereabout.

Rem 700 short action,
krieger 26” 1-8
Calvin elite trigger
McMillan HTG -
Swrovski X5i 5-25x56
By the way the rifle and I are handicapped, lefty😊

It will be great to hear/see what you good folk consider a good group that will be inside the (kill zone) in field conditions at 600,800 and 1000 yards from a long range hunting rig.

Hi, from New Zealand! I was shooting a fairly new custom 65-284 last weekend and got a 2 1/2 three shot group at 543 metres. 50 odd rounds down the tube.
I shoot off a bipod and bag but this time it was a jacket for the rear rest.
My 18 year old son shot a group just under 3” 20 minutes later at the same distance using my rifle.
Load is 130 VLDH 51.5gr ADI 2209 which is the H4350. @ 3025 FPS. Waiting for the barrel to shift gears as cut rifle barrels usually do and see another 100 FPS or thereabout.

Rem 700 short action,
krieger 26” 1-8
Calvin elite trigger
McMillan HTG -
Swrovski X5i 5-25x56
By the way the rifle and I are handicapped, lefty😊

It will be great to hear/see what you good folk consider a good group that will be inside the (kill zone) in field conditions at 600,800 and 1000 yards from a long range hunting rig.
This is at 700 yards with a 338 Lapua and I thought I was missing because I couldn't see my hits after the first shot!!
 

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Marky

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jun 27, 2018
Messages
67
Location
New Zealand
View attachment 242054View attachment 242055View attachment 242056
1360 yards best group ever, two shots to confirm ballistic data two weeks ago in my ultra light .284 Winchester at 835 yds, and longest kill. My goal is half minute accuracy at least, assuming favorable wind conditions, but I strive for quarter minute accuracy, or better, for my long range rifles.
Fantastic, me too. I work along those same principles. How light is ultra light. What stock, action, barrel and scope did you use for this build?
 

COBrad

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 4, 2004
Messages
1,348
Location
Western Colorado
Fantastic, me too. I work along those same principles. How light is ultra light. What stock, action, barrel and scope did you use for this build?
It’s a New Ultra Light Arms gun. According to my bathroom scale it’s an even 7lbs with a nightforce 2.5-10x42 in Talley aluminum mounts. The only thing I would change now that I’ve used it some is to have gone with the long action.
 

Starlite

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Joined
Dec 8, 2019
Messages
528
Location
New Brunswick Canada
Q pls: Any idea how Sako improves their action over Tikka's?
I don’t know if there is still a big difference but there used to be. Sako is a 1 piece solid with a metal bolt Shroud. Sako is a control feed meaning you can run the action lying on your back and not have the cartridge fall out. Can cycle rounds while on safe. Can load thru the ejection port. Better fit and finish. Have never fired a tikka. From what I understand their the same barrel and possibly trigger too.
 

Marky

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jun 27, 2018
Messages
67
Location
New Zealand
It’s a New Ultra Light Arms gun. According to my bathroom scale it’s an even 7lbs with a nightforce 2.5-10x42 in Talley aluminum mounts. The only thing I would change now that I’ve used it some is to have gone with the long action.
That’s a good weight to lug around! I love that scope, it’s a little beauty, sits on my 223 Blaser Varmint/match barreled. Can shoot bunnies out to 350/400 @10 power
 

huntsman22

Well-Known Member
Joined
Feb 14, 2015
Messages
640
Location
Kiowa/Deer Trail, CO
Got back to the truck after coyote calling and leaned the rifle against the truck, while I stripped my camo. My dog knocked it over and it hit the frozen ground right on the scope. So when I got back to the house, I shot one round to confirm zero and then tossed 3 pokes at 700 yards... RAP creed in a LSS.

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Marky

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jun 27, 2018
Messages
67
Location
New Zealand
Got back to the truck after coyote calling and leaned the rifle against the truck, while I stripped my camo. My dog knocked it over and it hit the frozen ground right on the scope. So when I got back to the house, I shot one round to confirm zero and then tossed 3 pokes at 700 yards... RAP creed in a LSS.

IMG_1209.JPG

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Pretty good, that’s dead game for sure at those ranges. What’s you load if you don’t mind sharing.
 

COBrad

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Joined
Jan 4, 2004
Messages
1,348
Location
Western Colorado
That’s a good weight to lug around! I love that scope, it’s a little beauty, sits on my 223 Blaser Varmint/match barreled. Can shoot bunnies out to 350/400 @10 power
This is my second NF 2.5-10. The first was on a custom 270 WSM that was used to shoot marmots out to 800 yards. It was plenty of scope. Used it on one shot on a marmot at just over 1K yards. I missed, but only by inches. Didn't get the wind quite right. I'll gladly take the extra half pound of this scope to get turrets and reliability I have come to trust.
 

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