Rifle mounted tripod/bipod adapters

livetohunt

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They fit RRS, I based my design off the RRS specs. I have had it on my promaster ball head, and also my sirui VA5 fluid head. I've had numerous people say they fit the RRS heads like a glove.

here is a post from another forum from someone who recently purchased a titanium version.

"Wanted to post up some pictures after getting the titanium arca plate in from salmon river solutions and mounted up. Fit and finish are phenomenal. It feels custom fit to the RRS anvil-30 head. Definitely the go to product for mounting an arca plate to a hunting style rifle, most others out there are all longer than necessary."
 

livetohunt

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Depending how you setup the tripod and are applying pressure with your shoulder, arm, hand etc will affect how much recoil is pushed into the tripod, pushed into the ground, or pushed into your shoulder. Shooting a steep uphill shot with a magnum rifle off the tripod, if your not shouldering into it hard, (leaning into the tripod legs to apply forward pressure on it) you can bet that gun is going to be moving, if not flying off the tripod. I treat it similarly to a bipod, and preload it forward as consistently as I can.

Its all just a learning curve and practicing with it.
 

livetohunt

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are these plate adapters proprietary to certain bipods/tripods?
They aren't "proprietary" as the arca system is a general specification.

They will work with any tripod head that has an arca style clamping system, such as sirui, promaster, RRS, etc.

The picatinny is just a military spec. and can be found online. If you have a bipod that attaches via picatinny, it will fit the pictatinny rail on my adapters.
 

yobuck

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I have shot my 375 H&H and other magnum calibers many times off my tripod(s). It has always worked great through you are correct that the rifle will have to be aimed again for the next shot -- just like any other rest. The tripod WILL be disturbed by the recoil unless shooting a really mild caliber. Even with the disturbance, the tripod allows me to get back onto the target as quickly as any other rest.
Well like you, we have been experimenting with different types of shooting rests for many years.
What might work pretty well for practice shooting at rocks or some type of target, wont necessarily work well when used for hunting. And especially in locations with lots of trees where within a few steps an animal can disappear from sight. The only way to prevent that is to never lose sight of it in the scope during recoil.
And that requires free but controlled movement of the rifle during recoil so that the target isnt lost, even for a short period of time. Its especially critical if the animal has been hit on the first shot and takes off running that it isnt lost from the view of the shooter. Especially so without the assistance of a spotter, which im assuming many hunters dont use.
These things just dont stand around waiting till you get your stuff back together for a follow up shot like a gong plate will.
We hear the nay sayers preaching about not taking shots at animals we arent absolutely sure of, but what about follow up shots, shouldnt we be sure about those also?
 

MerlinMc

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Well like you, we have been experimenting with different types of shooting rests for many years.
What might work pretty well for practice shooting at rocks or some type of target, wont necessarily work well when used for hunting. And especially in locations with lots of trees where within a few steps an animal can disappear from sight. The only way to prevent that is to never lose sight of it in the scope during recoil.
And that requires free but controlled movement of the rifle during recoil so that the target isnt lost, even for a short period of time. Its especially critical if the animal has been hit on the first shot and takes off running that it isnt lost from the view of the shooter. Especially so without the assistance of a spotter, which im assuming many hunters dont use.
These things just dont stand around waiting till you get your stuff back together for a follow up shot like a gong plate will.
We hear the nay sayers preaching about not taking shots at animals we arent absolutely sure of, but what about follow up shots, shouldnt we be sure about those also?
Agreed. When to use or not use a tripod depends on the type of hunting being done and even the particular situation within the type of hunting. I most often use my camera tripods for still hunting.

For walk and stalk, I have tried various shooting sticks, but have settled on the Spartan bipods and tripods which attach with a strong magnet rather than a dovetail. Even though these solutions are more flexible (but less solid) than the camera tripod, there are instances where they don't make sense either. It's easy to not use them if the situation warrants.

Also agree that we should be thinking carefully about the first shot and the follow up shot(s). In some instances, the first shoot is particularly critical with one example being crocodiles. If the first shot doesn't instantly kill or at least paralyze the animal, there probably won't be a second shot as the croc will be underwater.
 

yobuck

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east central fl. /n.c. pa.
Agreed. When to use or not use a tripod depends on the type of hunting being done and even the particular situation within the type of hunting. I most often use my camera tripods for still hunting.

For walk and stalk, I have tried various shooting sticks, but have settled on the Spartan bipods and tripods which attach with a strong magnet rather than a dovetail. Even though these solutions are more flexible (but less solid) than the camera tripod, there are instances where they don't make sense either. It's easy to not use them if the situation warrants.

Also agree that we should be thinking carefully about the first shot and the follow up shot(s). In some instances, the first shoot is particularly critical with one example being crocodiles. If the first shot doesn't instantly kill or at least paralyze the animal, there probably won't be a second shot as the croc will be underwater.
Well in Pa which is where ive always hunted, pretty much all of the long range hunters, of which there are plenty, use a bench to shoot from while hunting. Reason being that the steep terrain isnt very condusive to prone shooting, and beyond that, most of us can shoot better from a bench.
More and more the hunters are using a return to battery type rest as well, for the reasons i spoke of in my earlier post.
But, some of us over the past few years have taken to using larger tripods as opposed to using a bench.
We find that standing while shooting when hunting, has advantages over shooting prone or from a bench, unless the bench is elevated and braced for better stability.
Much depends on the weight of the gun, as the heavier ones do better from a bench.
Also remember that in Pa all LR hunting is done from fixed locations, walking about as is done in other parts of the country just wont work well there, again due mainly to the type terrain.
But thats a method that works in other parts of the country as well, but just not a preferred method by many in the other areas.
So weight of the gun and that of the shooting system isnt as critical in Pa for that reason.
But none of that affects things as far as the shooting part goes, and having the ability to stay on the animal following a shot.
How we prefer to go about the hunting part is one thing, but the shooting part is the same regardless as to where it takes place.
Which is what prompted my questioning this device.
 

MerlinMc

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Well in Pa which is where ive always hunted, pretty much all of the long range hunters, of which there are plenty, use a bench to shoot from while hunting. Reason being that the steep terrain isnt very condusive to prone shooting, and beyond that, most of us can shoot better from a bench.
More and more the hunters are using a return to battery type rest as well, for the reasons i spoke of in my earlier post.
But, some of us over the past few years have taken to using larger tripods as opposed to using a bench.
We find that standing while shooting when hunting, has advantages over shooting prone or from a bench, unless the bench is elevated and braced for better stability.
Much depends on the weight of the gun, as the heavier ones do better from a bench.
Also remember that in Pa all LR hunting is done from fixed locations, walking about as is done in other parts of the country just wont work well there, again due mainly to the type terrain.
But thats a method that works in other parts of the country as well, but just not a preferred method by many in the other areas.
So weight of the gun and that of the shooting system isnt as critical in Pa for that reason.
But none of that affects things as far as the shooting part goes, and having the ability to stay on the animal following a shot.
How we prefer to go about the hunting part is one thing, but the shooting part is the same regardless as to where it takes place.
Which is what prompted my questioning this device.
Interesting and thanks. I've never had the opportunity to hunt in PA. If a bench is available, then it seems that is going to be superior to tripods, bipods and shooting sticks.

My rifles tend to be heavy for multiple reasons. I like longer barrels with heavy contours. Weight helps mitigate some recoil which is important to me since I'm light and don't use muzzle brakes. For me, I also have an easier time stabilizing a heavier rifle.

I have not seen, let alone used, a return to battery rest. Would love to try one though. Are there any particular return to battery rests that you and your hunting friends like?
 

redneckdan

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MN Iron Range
So....yall are concerned about being able to track and reposition for a follow up shot off a tripod...then start talking about return to battery rests for hunting...ya, that totally makes sense.
 

yobuck

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east central fl. /n.c. pa.
So....yall are concerned about being able to track and reposition for a follow up shot off a tripod...then start talking about return to battery rests for hunting...ya, that totally makes sense.
Actually like any rest it dosent help at all with the hunting, only the shooting.
It might even make sense to you if you tried it. lol
Any type support is better than none, but the really good ones dont come cheap and they dont come small.
And that as a rule becomes the tipping point for most.
 

middleofnowhere

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Jun 26, 2016
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Yucca Valley, CA
I wish I would have seen this earlier. I just ordered an RRS plate and piece of pick rail to try on my ridge line stock.

*Edit: my piece of pic rail I had researched, thought was made in USA says made in China on the package. Shipping it back :(

Will the TI plate work properly with the skinny Christensen composite stock?
D56A25E8-3074-4532-87A3-5BF5771EE5FB.jpeg
 
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livetohunt

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I wish I would have seen this earlier. I just ordered an RRS plate and piece of pick rail to try on my ridge line stock.

*Edit: my piece of pic rail I had researched, thought was made in USA says made in China on the package. Shipping it back :(

Will the TI plate work properly with the skinny Christensen composite stock?
View attachment 192976
Per our pm’s your mount is on its way. The radius bottom version is a really good solution for a stock like that. And I make all my own stuff so I guarantee it was made in the US!
 

livetohunt

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I ran a couple extra of the titanium radius bottom versions for hunting style stocks with a radius.

Finish can be garnet blasted or flame anodized and will come with either 10-32 or 1/4-20 fasteners. $65 shipped CONUS I have 3 left.
image.jpg
2A3F2A89-0FEF-4BA1-B8DE-46B3B05BE387.jpeg
 

livetohunt

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Finished the design and made 5 of the radius bottom arca + pic with sling stud last night.

Pm me if your interested in one.

0A9BB551-F0B1-4ADB-943E-936228D30EE2.jpeg
98C65C90-65D2-4F79-9683-91C3DF61D40F.jpeg
418F6B00-B3EB-4CBA-8A2A-3774C52716EB.jpeg
 

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