Reamer resharp and reshape - different from maker

Discussion in 'Gunsmithing' started by jfseaman, Sep 5, 2015.

  1. jfseaman

    jfseaman Well-Known Member

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    With the comments made here I am thinking about rehsarp services.

    Does anyone have experience sending a PTG to JGS or Manson?

    I am also wondering about having my 27-Nosler and 30-Nosler made into proper 277/26-Nosler and 308/26-Nosler so that neck and throat are more "correct".

    I know that costs savings is minimal but with a batch of 6 or 8 reamers the savings could pay for more tooling.

    What do you think?
     
  2. Hired Gun

    Hired Gun Well-Known Member

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    I have had JGS completely change one and it cost $80 for what I had done. I had them fix my PTG reamers too. That was pretty cheap.
     
  3. shortgrass

    shortgrass Well-Known Member

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    I've used both Manson and JGS to sharpen and alter PT&G tools. Both are very reasonably priced. Mansons' current turn-around time on most alterations is about 10 days. That's fast enough for me!
     
  4. J E Custom

    J E Custom Well-Known Member

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    Dave Manson also does reamer re sharpening and if the original reamer allows, changing it to a different cartridge of the same caliber it should be minimal.

    He normally charges $30.00 to re sharpen a reamer. he would want to give you a quote for other type of alterations to a reamer.

    I have not used JGS for this service, but if Hired Gun says they are good you can take that to the bank.

    It is a great way to render a poor cutting reamer that is no good in the first place, into a good one and at a much better savings.

    J E CUSTOM
     
  5. phorwath

    phorwath Well-Known Member

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    I'm curious as to how the neck and throat of a chamber reamer can be resharpened without ending up with a smaller diameter. I can understand the shoulder and body being set back a little bit and maintaining diameter. The neck and throat are what puzzle me...
     
  6. SidecarFlip

    SidecarFlip Well-Known Member

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    Interesting. I use Ohio Cutter Grinding in Cleveland, Ohio for all my resharpening of perishable tooling in the shop thats HSS. Everything else gets tossed 'cause it's carbide or ceramic.

    While I've never had a chamber reamer sharpened, I've had chucking reamers reground, countersinks ground and fast helix reamers ground. Keep in mind that everytime they are reground the diameters shrink. Remove metal and things get smaller.
     
  7. shortgrass

    shortgrass Well-Known Member

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    Even tool makers have a 'tolerance' they work within. Sharpening the body and shoulder of a chambering reamer is easy to visuallze, necks & throats are a bit more. The forward end of the neck portion of the reamer has an angle similar to that of a chucking ( a reamer for a straight hole) reamer. That's the part that does the most 'neck' work and the part that is sharpened. Some but not all chamber necks have slight taper, so grinding can be done there, too (slightly bigger at the back than at the front). On those that are straight, and are a SAAMI speced tool very little can be done beyond removing a half thousanth from the OD one time. It depends on the reamer and the allowable SAAMI spec of the chamber it cuts. By sharpening that angle at the end of the neck it makes it possible to sharpen the throat so the neck has been moved back the appropiate amount. Sharpening the shoulder makes the neck longer. The length of the neck is shortened by sharpening. Make sense? The tool maker is dealing with tiny areas and even smaller tolerances. Chambering reamers are usually used at reduced speeds and feeds compared to 'straight hole' production tooling, so not much needs to be removed to 'freshen' them.
     
  8. phorwath

    phorwath Well-Known Member

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    Thanks for explaining that shortgrass. That makes perfect sense. My reamer has a neck of uniform diameter the full length, and the section just in front of the neck (lead) where the bearing surface of the bullet extends forward from the case neck of a cartridge also has no taper. So those were the areas I couldn't imagine sharpening without losing diameter.

    I haven't had my barrel chamber cut yet, but I'm going to pull out my reamer and look at it more closely now under a magnifying glass to see of the cutting surfaces look uniform and sharp. Someone posted a pic earlier of a chamber reamer with a cutting edge that looked like a rasp! I don't want to ruin a $350 barrel with a $125 chamber reamer...