One powder, multiple calibers?

adiredneck

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So I bought a Hornady lock & load kit earlier in the summer when Midway was having their anniversary sale. It is still in the box in the garage. I have a .308, a 7mm-08, and a .30-06.

I want to pick up the rest of the supplies to start reloading. Is it wise to try to use one powder for all three calibers? My primary use is deer hunting with 150-180 grain bullets in all three cartridges.

I can pick a 3-way compatible powder from the book that came with my reloader, but I would like some opinion from you reloaders before I do that. Lots of choices. I see RL-15 is one example that fits the entire range.

Any suggestions? Thanks.
 

deathwobble

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varget works great for .308 and 30-06 never loaded for the 7mm-08 before But a good friend of mine has with 140s and varget. seems to be a great load. I would keep the bullet weight in the 150-170 range for the 30 Cals if your use varget though. It might be to fast for a 180gr.
 

adiredneck

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So far for the 30 calibers, I have a box of Hornady BTSP 180grain.

I just got the 7mm-08, I had good results shooting a box of Federal Blue box in 150 grain yesterday. I am looking at bullets for it now.

The 30-06 probably will be the last caliber that I buy dies for, so if it makes sense to concentrate on the 7-08 and 308, that's fine by me.
 

Joe King

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243 and 95-100gr/7mag 160-168gr. Both rifle used RL22 for pet loads for quite a few years now i suspect their both going to be switched to H1000, I could probably get away with h1000 in the 270 with heavier bullets also. So yea it can work very well.
 

MuleHunter

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For long range, meaning high BC heavy for caliber bullets, generally a slow powder its desired to get the highest velocity possible without sacrificing accuracy. I would stay away from the double based powders like Alliant, in my experience they are accurate but not temperature stable. The best versatile powders to keep in the reloading room are H4350, H4831sc, and H1000. With these powders you can find a suitable load with almost any cartridge and it will be temperature stable.
 

FEENIX

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For long range, meaning high BC heavy for caliber bullets, generally a slow powder its desired to get the highest velocity possible without sacrificing accuracy. I would stay away from the double based powders like Alliant, in my experience they are accurate but not temperature stable. The best versatile powders to keep in the reloading room are H4350, H4831sc, and H1000. With these powders you can find a suitable load with almost any cartridge and it will be temperature stable.

I too like the H4831/SC and H1000 for its temp stability and versatility.
 

Gene R.

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I agree w/above 4350,4831 types are a staple powder of most loaders. Also I do like the REloader 19, and 22. They shoot well in my calibers. I've never had a problem with temp sensitivity affecting my shooting. It wont be long and and you'll have awhole variety of powders after the reloading bug has infected you:D. Then, You'll be in the endless search for the perfect load combination.

Gene
 

mtelkhntr78

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If I had to pick just one-H4350. It may not be the fastest but its very temp stable and i have found it to work well(accuracy) in multiple calibers.
 

Sully2

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varget works great for .308 and 30-06 never loaded for the 7mm-08 before But a good friend of mine has with 140s and varget. seems to be a great load. I would keep the bullet weight in the 150-170 range for the 30 Cals if your use varget though. It might be to fast for a 180gr.
Varget is what Im loading at present in 22-250; 243; 260; 25-06 and 6mmBR. Not saying it will be what I end up with...but it loads and shoot fine
 

Greyfox

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I have used Varget in all three calibers with excellent results. Fpur, including my 223. Varget is perfect for the 7mm-08, 308, and 223. It will work very well in the 30-06, being used by the Garand target shooters since the Garand does not function well with the slower powers. Just don't load it too hot, follow the Hornady manual. While Varget works fine in the 30-06, I will use IMR 4350 for my hunting loads to get some extra velocity, and fills the case. The Bullet weights I use are 140 for the 7mm08, 165-168 for the 308 and 30-06, and 55-69 for the 223. It's very convenient to use one power that is accurate, temperature stable, and produces good velocities with the optimum weight bullets.
 

Kevin Thomas

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Greyfox,

I'll take your comment one step further, if I may; it's not that the slower burning powders won't function well in Garands (they will function just fine), but that they will damage the gun. The gas system on these guns calls for relatively fast powders like 4895 or (at the slowest) 4064, ideally with bullets of not more than 175-180 grains. Slower powders, such as the 4350s or 4831s mentioned in previous posts WILL bend the op rod. Simply too much port pressure, which results in very violent cycling of the action, in turn resulting in parts breakage. This includes loads which are well under maximum pressures for the 30-06, and are perfectly "safe" by any other criteria. Op rods are getting harder to find these days, and ever so much more expensive, so it's not a mistake you can afford to repeat too often.
 

Greyfox

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Greyfox,

I'll take your comment one step further, if I may; it's not that the slower burning powders won't function well in Garands (they will function just fine), but that they will damage the gun. The gas system on these guns calls for relatively fast powders like 4895 or (at the slowest) 4064, ideally with bullets of not more than 175-180 grains. Slower powders, such as the 4350s or 4831s mentioned in previous posts WILL bend the op rod. Simply too much port pressure, which results in very violent cycling of the action, in turn resulting in parts breakage. This includes loads which are well under maximum pressures for the 30-06, and are perfectly "safe" by any other criteria. Op rods are getting harder to find these days, and ever so much more expensive, so it's not a mistake you can afford to repeat too often.

Thanks for the expanded explanation Kevin.
 

Kevin Thomas

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Sorry, just a pet peeve of mine. Seen too many of these guns damaged already and trying to avoid any new examples. Your suggestion of Varget, incidentally, was spot on. An excellent choice for gas guns, from heavy weight bullets in ARs on up to 150-175 grain bullets in M1As/M14s or M1 Garands.
 
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