How much weight/distance for backpack training?

Calvin45

Well-Known Member
Joined
Apr 13, 2019
Messages
427
Location
Nipawin, Saskatchewan, Canada
Deadlifts and my previously recommended “farmers walks” have tons of carryover for another hunting reality...having to drag a dead animal out of the bush, or across a field, or through deep snow, or up a hill, or having to get it into a truck box if you’re alone. These exercises develop the strong hands and wrists and upper body in way that a heavy backpack has little effect on. These drags always make me grateful when I’ve got a buck and not a doe, even if he’s heavier by a good bit, the handles help
 

StanB

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jul 22, 2011
Messages
121
Location
PA
Some great comments above on weight amounts & distances, etc., and I too have found that squats, deadlifts, and farmer-carry have helped quite a bit. One thing I like to add during my rucks is some serious side-hilling to work the ankles and lateral (?) muscles / tendons in the hips and knees. Don't just go straight up/down the hills, get some side hilling in. Seems to pay off when hunting with better stability & balance when loaded up.
 

KurtB

Well-Known Member
Joined
Feb 11, 2004
Messages
475
Location
Colorado
I am doing about 30-32% of body weight in pack weight. Carrying it 2.5 miles around neighborhood in the mornings. Trying to get to a set of 200 steps 2x a week as well, sometimes carrying the 72 pound pack up and down those a few times. Nothing beats just packing weight for me.
 

Puddle

New Member
Joined
Oct 5, 2019
Messages
4
Location
PNW
I'm getting real close to 66, weighing anywheres between 198 - 202 lbs year round (depending on how often I drive by a DQ). I hike in the foothills around my shack 6 days a week, 4.5 - 5 miles/day. On alternating days I'm packing either a 20lb, a 30lb, or a 50lb slab of iron on my back. I'm always carrying a Garand with no sling. On average it takes me 1 hour and 20 - 30 minutes to do the loop; much longer if conditions call for snowshoes. Usually back at the shack by 8am to start the rest of my day. The rest of my day includes 30 situps and pushups 3 times a day.
Why the Garand? because after packing that year 'round any rifle I'm hunting with feels like one of those ultra-lightweight numbers everyone talks about.
 

deerhunter64

Well-Known Member
Joined
Aug 30, 2018
Messages
69
Location
California
In addition to my normal weight work outs , I normally start taking hikes with about 35 pounds of weights inside my hunting pack a month or so before the hunt. The altitude used to be difficult to simulate but now I live at 8000 feet so that is not an issue anymore.
 

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