Do you always lap your scope rings?

Discussion in 'Long Range Scopes and Other Optics' started by Bigeclipse, Oct 12, 2019.


Help Support Long Range Hunting by donating:


  1. L.Sherm

    L.Sherm Well-Known Member LRH Team Member

    Messages:
    1,764
    Joined:
    Jul 26, 2017
    I've lapped rings before were there were no way
    I've used them on scopes I've mounted for other people.
     
    teesquare likes this.
  2. WeiserBucks

    WeiserBucks Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,474
    Joined:
    Aug 16, 2016
    I didn't read the whole thread . Quality rings don't need lapping.

    Long live Remmy700
     
  3. doctorjj

    doctorjj Active Member

    Messages:
    27
    Joined:
    Nov 28, 2009
    I agree with that. If the rings are off that bad, you have another problem you need to correct first.
     
    teesquare likes this.
  4. ntsqd

    ntsqd Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    395
    Joined:
    Nov 16, 2015
    By not reading the whole thread you've missed the point that even quality rings may or may not be truly round and the point that it may not be the ring's fault.
     
  5. KS2506

    KS2506 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    47
    Joined:
    Jun 21, 2015
    I have had a gun shop for over 45 years. Was and still am a big fan of Rugers. Had many 77's and sold many. When the Leupold old 3x9 was a popular scope, they did not have enough windage adjustment many times to be zeroed properly. Was a real pain to get zeroed by changing different ring clamps on the bases to get them zeroed. When
    Burris came out with the Signature rings they were a Godsend. As far as holding ability, in the 80's I had a 8 lb. 458 M700 with a 3x Leupold that would not stay in place until I used the Signature rings. A friend and I shot it 75 times in one day and the scope never moved. Never thought about bedding it.
     
    teesquare, Rich Coyle and doctorjj like this.
  6. Stgraves260

    Stgraves260 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    268
    Joined:
    Sep 1, 2009
    All ways.
     
    Rich Coyle likes this.
  7. Clem Bronkoski

    Clem Bronkoski Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    166
    Joined:
    Jun 23, 2019
    Teesquare how can you possible know you're getting 100% contact with a production ring? It is impossible. Is it just because the manufacturer says so? Lapping rings as mentioned is not even recommended by a few manufacturers. Bedding rings takes a lot less time than lapping (not counting curing time) and better contact is guaranteed.
    When done properly and when re-installing the scope after cleaning up the excess bedding the scope is remarkably secure just setting in the lower half of the rings.
     
    L.Sherm likes this.
  8. ntsqd

    ntsqd Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    395
    Joined:
    Nov 16, 2015
    It is actually pretty easy to see what the contact area is when lapping. Usually the finish is removed by the process and there is a color difference between what has made contact with the lap and what has not.

    That said, the next set that needs this sort of attention I plan to bed. If only to have done it both ways and get a feel for which is the better process to choose for a particular instance.

    Same question, asked again: How much is good enough? I've no idea if an estimated 70% contact is good enough, or it needs to be some other (greater or lessor) number, or if it needs to always be 100% Some guys will want 100% regardless, and that's fine. Others will be OK with XX% if that is enough to keep the scope in place while not marring it.
     
  9. Rich Coyle

    Rich Coyle Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,540
    Joined:
    Aug 14, 2013
    For novelty, and I enjoy playing with guns and scopes, I sighted a rifle in using Signature insert rings. Never moved the reticle, just used the correct marked insert.
     
    Clem Bronkoski and teesquare like this.
  10. Clem Bronkoski

    Clem Bronkoski Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    166
    Joined:
    Jun 23, 2019
    Teesquare...I recant my reply to your post. I just took a good look at those Burris Signature Zee rings and see what you mean. They look like pretty good rings. Not super stout like those of some other manufacturers but great for Mr. Average Shooter.
     
    teesquare likes this.
  11. teesquare

    teesquare Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    265
    Joined:
    Nov 2, 2012
    Thanks Clem...just trying to help where I can. One of the issues I have with the design of the "heavy duty" rings is that I believe they are un-neccessarily heavy. Yes....their potential grip area is slightly larger. But at the cost of a lot more weight. Even the 34mm Signature Zee rings are too big and thick for my liking. I have never seen an actual benefit even with large magnums for such big and bulky rings. Sure if you shoot benchrest....extra weight is no problem..... actually a benefit. But for all other purposes....they make those big honkers to sell to the "tacti-cool" crowd.....
     
    ntsqd likes this.
  12. ntsqd

    ntsqd Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    395
    Joined:
    Nov 16, 2015
    And they aren't tacti-cool unless they've been beat on with a fugly stick for days.....
    They don't look Engineered, they look like the designer stuck his wet thumb in the wind and said " ...about like..... that! The machinists will like them because they're fewer ops and the Finance dept will like them because with less metal cut off the block they're faster & cheaper to make!"
    Retch!
     
    teesquare likes this.
  13. LongBomber

    LongBomber Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    487
    Joined:
    Dec 27, 2008
    And the point that the rail and action may be off. Perfect rings on an action that isn’t true is still an issue.
     
    L.Sherm and Rich Coyle like this.
  14. teesquare

    teesquare Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    265
    Joined:
    Nov 2, 2012
    AGREED.....! :D:D:D:D:D:D:D