Budget build

Cheaper budget rifle or save for more expensive?

  • Cheaper and now

  • Expensive and later


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IndianaMatt

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Joined
Dec 9, 2017
Messages
316
Location
Indiana
As some of you know I have been planning a short action magnum build for a while.

I have gotten several parts together and have decided on a 25 SST.

Here is my dilemma-
I could buy cheaper stuff and do it now or continue to save and buy more expensive parts as I go. What would you do?
 

Frog4aday

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LRH Team Member
Joined
Oct 25, 2007
Messages
1,249
Location
Tennessee, USA
Without knowing your personality type, it's hard to advise you. Some people only want the best and always regret settling for "good" or "really good". If that's you, wait until you can buy what you absolutely want. You'll be happier in the long term.

If you are the type of guy who gets the bug for something now, then it fizzles out and you are ready to move on, finish up your build now with what you can afford and enjoy it while the interest for you is high. If you find your interest in this particular rifle continues or grows over time, you can swap out things as you can afford them and make it as deluxe as you want in time.
 

MudRunner2005

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Joined
Oct 13, 2008
Messages
14,708
Location
Alabama
I buy whatever I can afford right now. Short term satisfaction that I get bored with easily and move on. Winds up costing just as much in the end and still left with so-so equipment.

Don't do what I do.
Yes, but you can be shooting quicker, and then saving up for the good stuff to upgrade with later... That's what I do. It's not always ideal, but it gets you out to the range, and, if you're not 100% you want to long-term invest in a particular cartridge and you just want to stick your toe in the water for now, you're not out a crap-ton of money in a $1,000 barrel blank, and $500 worth of custom dies, a reamer, and gauges.
 

slv hunter

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Joined
Apr 2, 2014
Messages
446
Location
colorado
I am just starting a build. I will be saving and buying for a while but it will be a very nice rifle and worth the wait. An investment of thousands with optics etc... but if you do it right to start out, later all you do is re-barrel and you always have a quality rifle. Imo
 

762x51

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Joined
Jan 8, 2016
Messages
621
Location
NC
i buy the best stuff that i can afford at the time. i have 2 kids in daycare, so builds are taking forever right now. i used to buy the cheap crap to build my ARs just to get them together, but i've stopped. took me about a year to build my AR in 6.5 grendel. i bought a new remington 700 about 2 years ago and so far have the badger rail, PTG lug and badger bolt knob. this may i should have the money to have the action blueprinted. then i'll start saving for a barrel.
 

KyCarl

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Joined
May 10, 2017
Messages
2,042
Location
Petersburg Kentucky 41080
I like to plan and save for just what I want. I like long term thought out goals.
I've regretted "settling" way too many times in the past.
I saved for a month to get a Bix n Andy 2 stage trigger. Would a lower priced one work? Absolutely! But I wanted a Bix.
 

therifleman556

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Joined
Jul 9, 2017
Messages
1,118
Location
The Banned Wagon
Yes, but you can be shooting quicker, and then saving up for the good stuff to upgrade with later... That's what I do. It's not always ideal, but it gets you out to the range, and, if you're not 100% you want to long-term invest in a particular cartridge and you just want to stick your toe in the water for now, you're not out a crap-ton of money in a $1,000 barrel blank, and $500 worth of custom dies, a reamer, and gauges.

This is my feeling on upgrading in a leap frog fashion. When I jump in and buy something (rifle, parts, etc...) I wind up shooting it for awhile and thinking how I'd like it better "if only this were different'. With that in mind I sell some of this or change that and the project morphs into something slightly or sometimes all together different.

An example for me is that I loved shooting my Browning A-Bolt 270 WSM. Fast, flat, and handy; it's everything a guy could want for chasing deer from the thick out into the open hayfields. I though "why don't I just make this my long range toy, dual purpose rifle". So I ordered 30mm rings and a B&C stock. Got the rings and found out it will not eject empties without hitting the scope. I immediately called B&C and changed my order to a Tikka stock, listed the Browning for sale and hunted down a Tikka. Found one, put it together and thought "man, that's awesome. Looks cool, very handy and trigger is beautiful". Load up, head to the range and damnit the empties won't clear the scope (this was my favorite scope and I'd be damned if I was going to change it). So guess what? Now I've got to change the scope, mount it higher (which I hate doing), or change the rifle (again).

I'm sure I can work this out with different rings or a scope with smaller knobs, but it got me thinking. Should I have just saved up a little longer and got a CA Ridgeline?

Probably would've had the same issue, but I hate the "what ifs".
 

KurtB

Well-Known Member
Joined
Feb 11, 2004
Messages
761
Location
Colorado
If working on a budget, I'd find a 6.5 creedmoor or a 6.5 PRC and skip the 25SST. Plus if you get sick of it, your resale is going to be much better with one of those two. Just buy an accurate factory rig and cut to the chase. Way way less if tight on money.
 

dirtytough

Well-Known Member
Joined
Oct 18, 2006
Messages
364
Location
Nodak
Grab a side job so you can buy exactly what you want sooner and not settle. Win win.

Growing up my dad always made sure to buy top quality stuff. It rubbed off on me so now it’s really hard for me to “settle” for something that in my mind might not be as good of quality or exactly what I want.

The other thing is you are willing to spend a lot extra for a wildcat. Might as well put that expensive wildcat in the parts you actually want also.
 
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