Anti-cant consistency

Roe

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Might be useful. Head movement not often addressed.

 
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WildRose

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"Yep", very helpful. It's the little things that add up to big errors.

The slightest pressure to the side either way can have a definite effect be it before, or during the shot.

Tiden er ute? = Time of flight?

Nice shooting. One thing I've always liked is the way Europeans set ranges and drills up to mimic field shooting. That kind of practice is much better than a day at a shooting bench.
 

Roe

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WildRose;1063479 Tiden er ute? = Time of flight? [/QUOTE said:
Not quite, it's "time's up" (in this case the 1 minute countdown).

For me, setting up my practice this way has proven to be the best way to check all my routines and adress the weak spots.
It doesn't produce bragging groups for the internet, but it does prepare me for hunting And perhaps most important: It has been possible to maintain a decent level of shooting with the little training that is possible when one has a family and a job.

With the combined effort of the vestibular sense, head movement and "muscle memory", cant consistency have become very good.

Key to reaching this resolution was learning that the eyeballs will automatically try to straighten the sight picture and then learning to recognize what "straight" really loos like by looking at the reticle alone - I don't use any terrain features.

I have also mounted my rifle at an angle so I can hold the rifle as my anatomy dictates - the scope is not level to the rifle stock. This is unconventional for tactical style shooters it seems, but seems to be the done thing when one reads the books about match shooting at international level.

Seems to work..
 

Roe

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I have also mounted my rifle at an angle so I can hold the rifle as my anatomy dictates - the scope is not level to the rifle stock. This is unconventional for tactical style shooters it seems, but seems to be the done thing when one reads the books about match shooting at international level.

Seems to work..

... and one thing I forgot to mention: I learned to recognize what a level reticle really looks like by aligning it to a hanging plumbline. By doing this I also found how to mount the scope - I just held the rifle and looked to see how far off the reticle would be in this
 

WildRose

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Not quite, it's "time's up" (in this case the 1 minute countdown).

For me, setting up my practice this way has proven to be the best way to check all my routines and adress the weak spots.
It doesn't produce bragging groups for the internet, but it does prepare me for hunting And perhaps most important: It has been possible to maintain a decent level of shooting with the little training that is possible when one has a family and a job.

With the combined effort of the vestibular sense, head movement and "muscle memory", cant consistency have become very good.

Key to reaching this resolution was learning that the eyeballs will automatically try to straighten the sight picture and then learning to recognize what "straight" really loos like by looking at the reticle alone - I don't use any terrain features.

I have also mounted my rifle at an angle so I can hold the rifle as my anatomy dictates - the scope is not level to the rifle stock. This is unconventional for tactical style shooters it seems, but seems to be the done thing when one reads the books about match shooting at international level.

Seems to work..
Ahh. "Time" I got, and I was extrapolating possible meanings for the rest.

Your method actually makes good sense. The error you induce by not having the scope in perfect alignment with the bore is negligible. As long as your reticle is plumb with every shot you will have consistent results downrange when dialing or holding over.
 

WildRose

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Roe I was thinking about you and this thread at the range yesterday. I've been breaking in a new Muzzle loader and feeling like a rookie.

This one has a pistol grip type cutout for the stock.

PR3112SN-CVA-Accura-Nitride-TH-SS-Realtree-APG-HD-50-call-fos.jpg
It's not natural for me so it's taken a lot of getting used to so I was paying a lot of attention to my form and mount which reminded me of your thread. I felt like I was getting some torsion related to the angle of the pistol grip and worked on bringing it up and getting plum etc quite a bit.

It dawned on me that with all of my shotgun shooting that's never a consideration.

That is instinctive or reactive shooting though. You bring up the shotgun, get a good weld with your shoulder and then bring your cheek to rest.

I do that in the same manner as you demonstrate with bringing your head straight down and "resting" it on the butt of the gun vs pulling the gun into your cheek.

I found after thinking about it a little at the bench I 'm the most solid when I settle the butt into the shoulder first, then bring the head down to rest on it and indeed when I mount the rifle in this manner I'm almost always instantly plum and level and when I'm not I see it instantly and correct just as quickly and easily.

One of the best things about this forum is that it gives us all a chance and a reason to think through the mechanics of how we do things rather than just going through the motions without thinking.

It's like doing vs teaching. When you are teaching you have to think your way through every aspect of the subject matter vs when doing and just flowing through the process without really consciously examining what you are doing and looking for ways to improve.

Thanks for bringing it up.
 
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