110 gr gsc elk bullet

Discussion in 'Rifles, Bullets, Barrels & Ballistics' started by tony m, May 9, 2014.

  1. tony m

    tony m Well-Known Member

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    Well , here I am again.I believe this is a effective choice for the .270 win..but have not tried it.Anyways if the Gsc hv achieves good penetration on a bull elk, some say exiting it.Why would you use anything heavier? Why then would it be any different for the Barnes 110 gr equivalent? I guess it asks the question..How much does a bullet have to penetrate really?
     
  2. Sully2

    Sully2 Well-Known Member

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    110 is too small.

    130 has been the choice in a 270 for decades and the 150 grainer isnt too far off the mark either.

    Any slug that EXITS has spent energy in the dirt somewhere...in one side and just under the skin on the other if its a broadside shot
     
  3. Jud96

    Jud96 Well-Known Member

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    The 110 is way too light. The heavier bullets will offer higher BCs and SDs. The BC will keep your energy and velocity down range while the SDs will add to penetration and effectiveness of the projectile. Personally I believe the 140gr bullets are the best for the .270 WIN. They offer a great happy medium between speed, energy, and trajectory. Check out the 140gr AccuBond or the 140gr Hornady SST and BTSP. These will offer great terminal performance and expand all of their energy rapidly into the elk's boiler room.
     
  4. bigngreen

    bigngreen Well-Known Member

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    I use heavier and I use cup and core because of deflection on elk and because I want a wound channel I can stick my hand through. Spent way to many years in the light fast bullet camp and lost elk and put more holes through elk than were needed because of it.
    You will absolutely be able to kill elk with the 110 but from experience using a 110 270 cal bullet on elk vs a 140 or better yet a 165 gr there is no comparison in the wound channel and no comparing them when hitting heavier elk bone. If I have a 270 that is twisted slow I'll shoot a 140 Berger but much prefer to shoot the 165 Matrix if I can, they crush elk like no other bullet I've ran through a 270 cal.
    An example would be hitting an elk in the neck, the 110 will not make it many yards before it won't break their neck and just try to bore a hole, the 165 will REMOVE a section of vertebra for and break the neck for a considerable distance, there's just no comparison!
    Deer and antelope at normal ranges the 110 TTSX is a great little bullet for normal ranges. Even if I'm shooting copper bullets now days I stick to shooting as heavy as I can, if I had to shoot copper in the 270 I'd rebarrel and shoot a Cutting Edge 160 grain.
     
  5. tony m

    tony m Well-Known Member

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    Thanks guys, a bull elk is a tough creature for sure, but I think there is a distinction between a light lead core bullet and the copper mono's.GS custom have an interesting approach .When I was young I worked as a guide here to, thru the 80's.More game was lost due to poor shooting skills and bullet construction than anything.These days the premium bullets have minimized problems with the latter.Coppers are in a different category again.I have witnessed awful displays of game shooting with the fearsome calibers, and were cleaned up with a smaller one. A cool cat, with a good understanding of his equipment usually prevails.But, there are many variables and there is nothing wrong with a good heavy bullet. ...the pendulum swings.Take care..good to here your opinions
     
  6. Dr. Vette

    Dr. Vette Well-Known Member

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    They make one in a 130 (see below) - I'm not sure why you would decide to go down to a 110 for an elk. As noted above, there are many reasons to go heavier with your bullets, and few if any reasons to go lighter.

    GS CUSTOM BULLETS - Specifications for use
     
  7. tony m

    tony m Well-Known Member

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    Actually, I have used lighter bullets on elk and moose with the 25 caliber in the past anyway, with good success.These were partitions and were very effective, the gsc, I believe would be even more effective.and I really like the drive band approach.I am just saying , to me if you are putting one of these thru bone , heavy muscling and exiting an animal, it is impressive.
     
  8. Jud96

    Jud96 Well-Known Member

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    A heavier bullet with a higher SD would even be more impressive.
     
  9. Broz

    Broz Well-Known Member

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    We all can justify anything we feel in our minds is what we want to work. For me after being in on the take for over a dozen elk a year for many years now I will use a heavier for caliber bullet. I am with BnG and in a 270 that will be a 150 plus in weight. But give me a god 30 cal with a 215 plus cup and core and I know for a fact my personal tracking ventures will be less. So far none.

    Sure you can kill elk with a 270 and a 110. But today we have some awesome tools for the job if we choose to be as effective as we possibly can.

    Jeff
     
  10. tony m

    tony m Well-Known Member

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    Ok..I see your point..we have all killed elk.Hell, I tipped over a good sized 6 point walking to the barn had to put the coffee cup down )from the house with the coyote gun a couple of years ago.This valley is like that.Back to my query..I am curious if others have tried the gsc hv 110 gr bullet for this purpose? This a new approch to this, and I believe to never say never.The 25/06 115/n part.worked well enough-110 GSC HV looks to be a better choice again time for moderate range with a skilled shooter.In my guiding days , when a new group of hunters arrived in elk camp,I was always suspicious of the noisy large caliber guy, to me they seemed poorly acquainted with there rifle, expecting it to makeup for a nervous twich or nagging hemeroids somehow, unless he was a sheep hunter to(sheep hunters have grit teeth y'know?)!This would cause me to pack a gun myself.Has anyone tried this product?Take care everyone.Maybe Gerard will chime in.
     
  11. tuck2

    tuck2 Well-Known Member

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    I have ben using a 270 since 1953 and have shot pronghorn, mule deer, elk and some unwonted critters with the rifle. I reload 100 and 110 grain bullets for the smaller critters and the 130 grain bullets for big game. I have not tried the all brass bullets but if I were to it would be with a bullet heaver that 110 grain for shooting elk.
     
  12. tony m

    tony m Well-Known Member

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    Sounds like a bunch of .270 win users out there, no matter of the bullet construction and weight.Thanks guys
     
  13. FEENIX

    FEENIX Well-Known Member

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    I like heavier bullets; my .270 AI primarily shoots the 165 and 175 (mostly) Matrix VLDs.
     
  14. Gerard Schultz

    Gerard Schultz Official LRH Sponsor

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    Dr Vette

    In the link you gave, the chart on which the stability factor is shown, requires a gyroscopic stability of 1.4 and that asks for a 1:8" twist rate. The 130gr HV bullet will not stabilise in a 1:10" twist.

    The .270" calibers all come standard with a 10" twist unless the rifle is fitted with a custom barrel that is tighter.

    For a 10" twist, the right length is therefore the 110gr HV bullet.

    GS CUSTOM BULLETS - Specifications for use

    When it comes to HV monometal bullets, weight is no longer important. We regularly shoot black wildebeest (300lbs to 400lbs) with 40gr HVs from a 22-250 and many eland (1000lbs to 2000lbs) have been shot successfully with 69gr HV bullets and a 243Win.

    Sectional density does not automatically give penetration. One requires speed as well as weight and lighter bullets go faster than heavier bullets. When the lighter and faster bullet is also more robust than the heavier and slower bullet, good things happen.