Whats next?

Discussion in 'Long Range Hunting & Shooting' started by timmymic, Aug 24, 2018.

  1. timmymic

    timmymic Well-Known Member

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    I have a rifle that shoots good that I have been hand loading for with a good optic on it, what would be next for gear to make myself more effective in the field?

    Things I am thinking:
    Kestrol ( I have no wind reading tools)
    MagnetoSpeed (Don't have my exact MV yet)
    RangeFinder (Considering the BR2)

    Please give suggestions if you think I am off.
     
  2. Bravo 4

    Bravo 4 Well-Known Member

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    A good rangefinder would be at the top of my list.
    The other two you can kinda fudge a little and get by until ranges get real long, accurate range is a must starting at moderate/medium range.
     
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  3. HARPERC

    HARPERC Well-Known Member

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    Rangefinder.
     
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  4. J E Custom

    J E Custom Well-Known Member

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    Magneto speed and then a BR 2 Range finder to put your velocities to work.

    J E CUSTOM
     
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  5. The Oregonian

    The Oregonian Well-Known Member

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    Rangefinder. On my 28N with the 195 Berger, by 300 yds I am getting 5 inches of drop every 50 yds. At 500 I get 10 inches every 50.

    What are you relying on for ranges now? And a range/competition or hunting? Really with either one you need a RF but if hunting you are completely guessing without one.
     
  6. Canhunter35

    Canhunter35 Well-Known Member

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    Rangefinder and get a 2000+ one so you don’t want to upgrade right away.
    I would then get a kestrel.
    Knowing ur mv is great, but you can also track it on targets. With a rangefinder and kestrel you know ur other inputs in order to calculate mv
     
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  7. 300whisper

    300whisper Well-Known Member

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    If you get a range finder make sure you get double what you’re actually going to shoot. So like a 2000 yard one you know will reliably read at 1000 yards. The further the distance the higher percent of error when the signal returns to the user.
     
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  8. jpfrog

    jpfrog Well-Known Member

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    I say get a Chronograph first, then a range finder. Hard to judge your dope without knowing your velocities. Also hard to know other important numbers like energy, etc. at given ranges. You don't need to go Magnetospeed unless the sun is never out where you live and light is a problem. I have one and like it a lot, but I started out with a cheaper model that I got used for around $70 and that performed well for years.

    That said, if you can BORROW a chrono to measure your velocities initially, and again after 100 rounds or so, that would be nice and would save you some money for your range finder.

    It's a tough call- hard to know what to dial at range if you don't know your velocities, but hard to know what to dial for once you know your velocity if you don't know your range. o_O
     
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  9. Canhunter35

    Canhunter35 Well-Known Member

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    I should ask, is this for hunting? If the ranges are known, is one thing. But you don’t need to know your mv or air density if you don’t have your range.
     
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  10. timmymic

    timmymic Well-Known Member

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    This would be for hunting out to 600 or so. I have a range finder for bow hunting that is probably good to that range but didn't know if it was adequit with the other features of the BR2
     
  11. Canhunter35

    Canhunter35 Well-Known Member

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    I have a bushy 1000 rangefinder, it can be frustrating to bounce critters at 600. I don’t think you need a g7 though. I have a leupold rx-2800 and it’ll range to 2000 no problem. There’s also the Nikon 3 and 4K. A lot of ranging on a budget. I print dope cards for various density altitudes that my kestrel gives me the number on. I haven’t found it necessary to have a ballistic solver on my rangefinder.
     
  12. JJMoody

    JJMoody Well-Known Member

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    What's your budget? BR2 retails at 1700, used magnetospeed sporter $100

    Used br2 can be had for 1000, Sig kilo 2000 350 ish
    At 600 yds, I'd run a Sig kilo and a magnetospeed sporter and a used kestrel.... shop em right and all can be had for less than $1000
     
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  13. Ingwe

    Ingwe Well-Known Member

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    I don’t care what anyone tells you but 600 yards is a LONG SHOT for the average shooter.

    At that kind of range, you need to know your range, drop, and wind drift. You also need to have practiced at shooting long range or else you are asking for a wounded animal.

    I can't emphasize it enough that you need to practice shooting long range!

    It’s not as easy as the magazines would have you believe;)
     
    Last edited: Aug 24, 2018
  14. LongBomber

    LongBomber Well-Known Member

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    Rangefinder, because you can and should actually shoot your drops on paper at the distance you think is your max.

    I shoot at one tall target and step back 100-200-300-400-500. same aim point, no scope adjustments. You directly measure your drops off of that. A chrony is nice (have a labradar) and it gives great data but I could live without it.