Vocabulary: "Trued" vs. "Blueprinted"?

Discussion in 'The Basics, Starting Out' started by Legionnaire, Jan 19, 2018.

  1. Legionnaire

    Legionnaire Active Member

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    Hey, all. I've been shooting for a lot of years (and lurking here for a while), but am fairly new to the nuances of long-range. I have a couple of capable rigs, but have started to contemplate doing some of my own assembly--for fun and the learning that will result. Likely going to start by tearing down and rebuilding one of my current Remingtons.

    I understand that you want the action "square" and everything lined up on center. I hear people talk about "truing" and "blueprinting" actions. Are these two terms for the same thing, or is the process actually different? I don't imagine doing either myself; just want to know what I'm talking about if engaging a smith to do the work.

    Thanks.
     
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  2. Jerry M

    Jerry M Well-Known Member

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    I believe 'trued' is a more accurate term. 'Blueprinting' come from automotive arena, where parts were welded and then machined.

    Just my two cents.
     
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  3. FEENIX

    FEENIX Well-Known Member

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    Instead of getting hang up with the terminology (truing vs blueprinting), ask the gunsmith what the actual process/steps and how the gunsmith is achieving them.

    Below a multi part video from Kevin Cram's LRH member ...



    and from Larry Potterfield ...

     
  4. stx

    stx Well-Known Member

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    Tagging in
     
  5. Legionnaire

    Legionnaire Active Member

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    Talked to a custom gun builder today. In his parlance, "truing" is making improvements to get things lined up on center of bore, and getting surfaces that should be perfectly square to the bore line. Truing is a matter of degree, as there are many things that can be done, including squaring the face of the action, lapping the bolt lugs, squaring the bolt face, etc., all of which contribute to "truing" the action.

    He explained blueprinting as a form of truing that, in addition to squaring the action and bolt face, includes chasing the barrel threads to ensure they are perfectly aligned to the bore. Bottom line, a lot of "truing" work can be done without a full "blueprint." That's how he explained it, anyway. And based on his explanation, we decided what he would do to true one of my 700s without doing a full blueprint.

    Thanks for the video links, by the way.
     
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  6. RockyMtnMT

    RockyMtnMT Official LRH Sponsor

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    May as well purchase a full custom action vs a blue print of a factory. Squaring an action should be part of the process of replacing a factory barrel with a custom barrel.

    Steve
     
  7. jrock

    jrock Well-Known Member

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    I use the terms as truing being a portion of what blueprinting is. Blueprinting is everything that could be done...thus you have to ask the question, "What is everything?" Truing, could be worth the money, blueprinting, not at all.
     
  8. RockyMtnMT

    RockyMtnMT Official LRH Sponsor

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    Maybe the only way the cost of blueprinting is worth it is if you have a donor action and you don't count its value in the cost of a build.

    Steve
     
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  9. Johnny05

    Johnny05 New Member

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    I was always taught that blueprinting was when an action is machined, it was “machined” into the center of tolerance. In other words, blueprinting and action may not be possible depending on how it was originally machined from the manufacturer.
    Trueing an action is putting everything on a centerline through the entire gun. It usually means oversizing certain parts or just squaring things up, but when done correctly, all important factors will be perpendicular or parallel to the centerline. When done on an existing action, it is out of print, but it will be true to the axis which improves accuracy.
     
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  10. FEENIX

    FEENIX Well-Known Member

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    My first introduction to a blueprint (schematic) was in 1980 with magnetic head manufacturing industry. At the time, part of my job includes machine shop taskings and it always starts with a blueprint of the item to be machined in accordance with the design engineer's perspective or as intended. So to me, blueprinting is making sure the item/product is built within the specifications/tolerances of the blueprint.
     
  11. J E Custom

    J E Custom Well-Known Member

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    Blue printing is the process of making every dimension to specification, fit, and size. It bases everything off of the bore centerline. This part is where "Truing" comes from.

    There are different levels of Truing But only one level of blue printing. When properly blueprinted, "EVERYTHING" is checked and brought into specification if found to be out. All surfaces that will wear are Honed, lapped and/or polished for operation to a recommended finish for the service.

    A good smith will automatically Do both truing and blueprinting because they are one and the same the only difference is the level of work done based on the actions needs.

    I consider Truing to be the least that should be done to "ANY" action even the custom actions should be checked before installing because not every custom action is perfect.

    SO, even though Truing and blueprinting are used as a description of work to be done to any action, One is the alignment of parts to the centerline of the bore and the other is the complete inspection and repair of anything that is not to specification.

    We see/use the word perfect, but in the real world perfect means as close as we can get. The one term you don't want to hear when referring to a blueprinting is "That's close enough, or It doesn't matter"

    J E CUSTOM
     
  12. pallen1067

    pallen1067 Well-Known Member

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    Spot on J E Custom and Feenix!!
     
  13. jrock

    jrock Well-Known Member

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    I read I a gunsmithing book that the term "blueprinting" came from the fact that blue layout die was used in order to verify perfect cleanup cuts and complete bearing between surfaces.

    I work in construction and blueprints just means plans, from that point of view. They were originally done on blue vellum. Fun fact for the day.
     
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  14. JohnMill

    JohnMill Well-Known Member

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    Here's my take and I did come here from automotive. Blueprinting is making it (anything ) the way the engineer designed it. I've never known one that designed it out of square or alignment. The way you get it is after the production dept adds enough tolerances to make the product profitable to mass produce. A custom action costs about the same as Remington would charge you for the same tight tolerances. Tight equals money. Tighter equals more money. Perfect (just barely good enough!) costs a prohibitive amount of money and is reserved for winning matches and setting records.