Thinking of reloading

Calvin45

Well-Known Member
Joined
Apr 13, 2019
Messages
743
Location
Nipawin, Saskatchewan, Canada
It’s never a bad time or idea...you will learn so much from this and your shooting experience overall will be much more personally satisfying, it’s an achievement. I honestly think I enjoy fiddling around with things in my load room as much as I enjoy actual shooting.

I think the key for you especially at this time in history is to not be in a big rush to acquire everything right now (side advice - first piece of reloading equipment I bought when I was 18 was a chronograph - best choice I ever made. It’s a priority). Just take it easy, don’t get screwed out of too much money on account of desperation and remember that times like these come and go...always have...and they’ll go again too.

beware the hoarders and gougers but do ask around, and check out the small local gun stores...contrary to what the news might tell you there’s lots of good honest folks out there who would be fair and willing to share (or perhaps
I’m naive...but I’d rather be the man who bought the Brooklyn bridge than the man who sold it)
 

Ol' Red

Well-Known Member
Joined
Nov 28, 2018
Messages
417
Location
Wyoming
Depending on your shooting style, where you shoot very little or you shoot a lot...you will never get to a break even point. You will buy things you never knew you needed and than buy stuff in case you need it and never use it. Send you kids to college instead, its cheaper.
I told my kids to join the military and pay for college with the G.I. bill. Daddy needs some more gun powder.
 

jasonco

Well-Known Member
LRH Team Member
Joined
Feb 11, 2009
Messages
1,351
Location
Colorado
I had no intention on getting a new press anytime soon, until, F-Class John, did the bestest review yet of what it does accurately, of the Area 419 Zero Press! Now I'm seriously considering this equipment and what I can sale to get it?!

 

F-270

Member
Joined
Jan 17, 2021
Messages
9
Location
NY
I've yet to seat a bullet but have managed to gather the tools and components needed the past two months. Right now I'm sitting on over 350 prepped cases in four chamberings and just put together load data on spread sheets last night. It's been a thought out process that I'm taking my time with.

I had a beam and digital scale previously, as well as a chronograph, which I used for archery purposes. When I finally decided to bite the bullet I asked a benchrest guy I've known for years if he or anyone he knew had gear they didn't need that they'd be interested in selling. He ended up giving me a Rockchucker press and two sets of dies. Some online ordering and a couple visits to an LGS set me up with most of the hardware and some standard components but that wasn't the end of it. Continued talks with other established handloaders has set me up with an amazing amount of stuff. Dies, bullets, brass, powder, primers, etc have all made their way to my bench as gifts. Some from folks I only know through the internet. It's extremely humbling to say the least. In every instance I'd offered to purchase or some form of exchange but was never taken up on it. By and large the handloading community is a great group of people from what I've experienced.

My point to this is for anyone getting started the best thing you can do is to talk with folks you know and trust who handload. They may not dump gear on you but they can get you pointed in the right direction. I have a sleeve of primers thanks to a tip from a friend who got word from a somewhat local supplier that they had them in stock. A day or two later I would have missed out. Just be mindful to complete the circle in some way down the line.
 

J-B welder

Well-Known Member
Joined
Oct 26, 2020
Messages
102
Location
Selkirk
I had held off commenting on this thread, but I just looked at the spreadsheet I've kept to track costs, and for me it's been economical (so far). I've included every little thing I've purchased for handloading, and the cartridges I'm producing range from $0.49 apiece for my practice rounds to $0.93 apiece for my hunting rounds. Compare that to cheap factory ammo like Winchester's Deer Season on the low end (about $0.75 per round) and Barnes VOR-TX on the high end (about $2 per round), and I'm saving some bread.

Of course, I'm only saving money if I had planned to increase the amount of shooting I'm going to do, which I had, which is why I decided to reload. And I've tried very hard not to buy every gadget, so my production rate is extremely low.

Anyway, for me the economics work out. But as others have noted, the reloading process is fun and rewarding in its own right, so maybe the savings are just gravy on the cake.
 
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