Thinking of reloading

SteelBanger

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Dec 4, 2019
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IL
As many others have said, you couldn't have picked a worse entry time into reloading, but, tomorrow could be even worse so why not get started however you can! Just know that there is practically no availability of components right now so you'll have plenty of time to research and decide what you want to buy. I got into reloading after the last ammo shortage (Sandy Hook) and I spent a few years acquiring components that will have me shooting comfortably for quite a while.

A good rule of thumb is that the economics (cost savings) shouldn't even be a factor in the decision because you will end up spending a good chunk of change that could take many years of reloading to pay off. Yes the ammo you handload will cost less per round than factory offerings (especially true with match grade ammo) but when you factor in all the tooling and presses it will likely be years until you see any kind of ROI.
 

P7M13

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If you do not count your time, you can save some serious money.
I first reloaded with a Lee Loader for 270 back in the '80's. It was about 1/3 the price of buying boxed ammo.
My first press was a Lee Loadmaster, which I used to load tens of thousands of pistol rounds. Yes, I saved money.
If you look at over 4K rounds loaded and shot of 7mm-08, 338 WinMag, 7 Rem Mag, 7 LRM, 338 Lapua, 416 Rigby, and 338 Edge, I've paid off the value of my equipment many times over. Add to that, the enjoyment, greater knowledge, and precision I have gained.
I did a cursory inventory of my supplies mid summer, and have easily $10K in equipment plus materials purchased, and ammo that I loaded. That's money I spent over the past decade, not value of the inventory. If I value the inventory, in powder and primers alone, at today's crazy prices, I have over $8500 sitting on my shelves. In loaded ammo, easily another $4K. I have enough on hand to outlast the coming administration until they are summarily discharged in four years.

But, getting into it NOW? You're forked.

I'm not sure this is actually true any more. Most of the used equipment I'm seeing online is going for what the out of stock new stuff is listed at. Or higher. Probably some bargains out there, but I'm not seeing them.
Supplies and equipment can be found at garage sales, but that's a low return investment of time, IMO.
 

6mm06guy

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Mar 2, 2015
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Missouri
With ammo hard to find, and with the rebellion upon us, was thinking of getting into reloading. How many 100s or 1,000s of round does it take for the economics of it to make sense?
I got into reloading and my original motivation was to save money, and it worked, my cost was $41.99 per box of factory ammo and my reloaded ammo was $17. Of course being the disease that guns, reloading and shooting are, it spread to over 50 different long guns that are now super tuned and save me absolutely $0 per shot. And cost me even more money shooting those amazing hammer bullets. Good luck in your endeavors.
 

Blackhawk

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Mar 29, 2018
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South Western Florida
With ammo hard to find, and with the rebellion upon us, was thinking of getting into reloading. How many 100s or 1,000s of round does it take for the economics of it to make sense?
I honestly do not think that you can look at this from a strictly monetary perspective. $$$$$

There is a certain peace of mind and satisfaction that comes, from the placement of a hand-loaded bullet that you send it downrange and then finds its mark.
That experience in itself is simply priceless. (ie POA = POI)


Unless you have experienced it first hand there is a very comforting and as well as relaxing feeling that one gets simply by rolling your own ammunition.

Picture this analogy if you will.
You can purchase a plain jane automobile without all the bells and whistles or you can buy the most expensive SUV with everything included.
True indeed that both will get you to your destination, but one may leave you with a cramped and uncomfortable feeling while the other will literally get you there in style.
So you truly do get what you pay for.
The choice is yours as there are so many goodies out there that you can literally break the bank. Just ask most of the others following this site. (myself included)
What I am eluding to is that by simple as the judicious selection of components you will do yourself proud knowing that your new equipment purchases will serve you well over your lifetime.

The dark side of this is that someone will always tout that you need this or that in order to be the best crack shot ever.
What I am trying to say is that don't always fall for that hype. Rather do your own research drawing your own conclusions.
There are informed as well as knowledgeable persons who are subscribers to this website and will impart their wisdom. If you have a question or unsure about a specific item all you need to do is ask.

Don't get me wrong there are plenty of products available to help you hone your reloading skills., Just some items will perform better than others
Do your homework analyzing your needs before making any purchases. (You will never go wrong if you purchase your reloading presses and dies from notable companies such as Redding, RCBS, Hornady, Forster & Lyman to name a few)
Handloading ammunition is only half the equation. Proving your loads out is the other half.
That however is reserved for a later discussion!
(Low E.S, S.D.numbers and of course Chronographs to record it all)

In closing, I could never place a price tag on the many hours I've happily spent reloading.
Satisfaction and Pride Yes, but a dollar figure Never!
Hope this helps.

Yes, prices have skyrocketed out of control and will only continue to go higher, so purchase what you can when you can.
With that thought now is the time to start doing research and making as many informed purchases as possible.
Again simply stated, "They ain't gonna get any Cheaper no time soon ". It's the law of supply and demand.
 
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misterc01

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Feb 15, 2019
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515
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Florida Panhandle
Instead of looking at the cost savings of reloading....you might want to think about the entertainment and enjoyment value you might get from reloading.

I get a lot of enjoyment from reloading and shooting my loads for precision rifles. Of course, on the flip side of it, I get much less enjoyment in loading pistol ammo on my Dillon.....just seems like its more of a production line compared to loading accurate rifle stuff.
I agree - that is why I bought a Lee turret press for pistol ammo!
 

Orange Dust

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Oct 23, 2015
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Mingo Swamp
You will spend more reloading. Buying components in bulk will save you money over factory. That savings will turn into added expense because you will shoot more. Then you will want to learn to load to get the most from your firearms and the loads that go with them. You will need a bunch of new stuff, plus different components to experiment with. The rabbit hole is deep my friend. It is also narrow, and there is no way to turn back once you enter. However, it is pretty much a moot point right now. There ain't a primer to be had unless you shoot 50BMG. Pretty difficult to load shells without primers.
 

J-B welder

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Oct 26, 2020
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Selkirk
I got good prices and quality at yard sales / estate sales. I picked up a used Rock Chucker, uniflow and a 10-10 scale. All are functioning perfectly after a thorough cleaning job.
That makes some sense. The folks selling on CL and ebay probably know what they have and how much people are willing to pay right now, so they're digging out the stuff they haven't used in years and posting it online. Folks running estate sales may have no idea what reloading equipment is worth on the current market, which as noted above is changing daily.
 

Rugerman77

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Jan 20, 2018
Messages
142
You can easily save enough money to justify it. Especially if you like real powder burners and expensive cartridges. It also tends to make me buy more expensive cartridges because reloading can justify them. Components are a little hard to find right now but that’s part of the fun.
 

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