SFP or FFP

Discussion in 'Long Range Hunting & Shooting' started by MontanaRifleman, Mar 15, 2013.

  1. I have used and prefer SFP. I always dial in my elevation for LR hunting shots.

    23 vote(s)
    27.4%
  2. I sometimes hold on game using reticle sub tensions LR hunting situations. I prefer SFP.

    22 vote(s)
    26.2%
  3. I have little experience with either SFP or FFP in LR hunting situations but prefer the SFP concept.

    3 vote(s)
    3.6%
  4. I sometimes hold on game using reticle sub tensions LR hunting situations. I prefer FFP.

    19 vote(s)
    22.6%
  5. I have little experience with either SFP or FFP in LR hunting situations but prefer the FFP concept.

    6 vote(s)
    7.1%
  6. I prefer SFP for LR hunting and FFP for tactical shooting.

    11 vote(s)
    13.1%
  1. MontanaRifleman

    MontanaRifleman Well-Known Member

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    Read the options carefully and pick the one that fits you best and maybe explain why. Sharing actual experiences would be helpful.
     
  2. MMERSS

    MMERSS Well-Known Member

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    I prefer SFP with MOA for hunting and FFP with MIL for tactical.

    Tactical=quicker decisions and FFP offers less steps to think about.

    LR Hunting=taking the necessary time to ensure everything is right before the shot and not rushing steps that could end with spending the remainder of your hunting trip tracking/looking for a wounded animal.
     
  3. angus-5024

    angus-5024 Well-Known Member

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    I chose the " I use SFP for hunting and FFP for tactical situations".

    This, to me, just makes sense. When your in the bush, your cross hairs are big and your not holding over and if you have a long shot in open country its gonna be on max magnifacation and you have time to dial (reticule is calibrated). Saving a few hundred bucks on the scope is a plus too.

    For tactical shooting and Coyote hunting i think that the FFP scopes have a huge advantage, because both situations are fast. fast situations call for simpler corrections.
     
  4. westcliffe01

    westcliffe01 Well-Known Member

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    A lot of people in the midwest think a 100 yard shot on a coyote is "long range" but it is not always true. Most of the time, line of sight is the biggest issue and the other thing common to relatively flat terrain is having a safe backstop.

    I have had the opportunity to engage coyote pairs at 250 yards and often, they never stop moving, since they do not like hanging around in open spaces. So taking the first shot one has to range, line up, lead and shoot. By the time you get on the second one the distance has opened up 100 yards and he is going like a bat out of hell. In my case, by the time he stopped it was 450 yards, and I only had a couple of seconds to react. I missed using my SFP Kentucky windage (Nikon plex reticle). I feel a lot more confident now with my Vortex, but I also have more practice although not shooting at coyotes...

    That is one of the only issues here, that I might have 4 sightings and kill 3 coyotes. Thats not a lot of practice for 80 days in the field. I think you guys out west get more "live" practice than we do...
     
  5. orkan

    orkan Well-Known Member

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    FFP for tactical. FFP for hunting. Works equally well for both. The strengths that are conceded to for tactical shooting, are also strengths for hunting. I don't have to buy another optic. I don't have to buy another rifle. I use the same rifle/optic for competition as I do hunting.

    FFP optics don't automatically force me into rushing a shot and wounding animals. It allows me to get a precise hold, faster, leading to fewer wounded animals.

    Having a FFP optic allows me to dial back my magnification based on my visibility conditions and maintain my wind holds.

    Were I hunting in brush, where my shot would be 50yds... then I'd be using an Aimpoint or similar red dot, or low magnification huge duplex SFP.

    Were I shooting benchrest, or other discipline where the target is always the same size, and is always in the same position, at the exact same distance... then I'd be using a high magnification SFP with ultra thin reticle.

    Outside of those situations, FFP has served me flawlessly.
     
    lancetkenyon likes this.
  6. sp6x6

    sp6x6 Well-Known Member

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    DITTO lightbulb
     
  7. Broz

    Broz Well-Known Member

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    I choose to use SFP for all my hunting both near and far, and I do dial 99% of my LR shots. Dialing is by far the most accurate hold at longer distances. I have tried both and came running back to SFP with open arms. SFP keeps the reticle the same size while the target grows in size with scope magnification. I prefer this and it allows for a precise hold for the long shots by increasing target size in relation to reticle thickness. Yet the reticle remains the same size for easy acquisition in dark timber when I have the magnification turned down for wider field of view. The FFP works in reverse of this and not to my liking. The FFP's I have used made the reticle too small for my in close encounter when pursuing bulls that reside in the shaded timber to escape mid day sun. So, I have found the SFP's to work well for me in all my hunting applications.

    Jeff
     
    Canadian Bushman likes this.
  8. mtnwrunner

    mtnwrunner Well-Known Member

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    I chose using SFP and sometimes using reticle subtensions for hold.
    My opinion is if it is a "fast" shot, all you are going to be doing is holding center out to 300 yards or whatever your maximum point blank range is. If its farther than that, you shouldn't be doing any fast shooting--IMO. After that, you should have time to dial and if you are shooting long and have to make a fast follow up you can use your reticle marks especially if you can spot your shots. This works for me but I always get them with the first shot:D:rolleyes:......

    Randy
     
  9. Outlaw6.0

    Outlaw6.0 Well-Known Member

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    Are you in the market for a new scope?

    I sometimes hold on game using reticle sub tensions LR hunting situations. I prefer FFP.


    ^^^My vote. For both of my critters last year, I used holdover on a FFP (TMR) scope. So far so good; can that change down the road? Sure. Then again, my last aquisition was another FFP (USO).

    I have & use both, I am honestly still open to using both. Neither have left me needing or wanting more.

    As of now it's FFP.


    t
     
  10. MontanaRifleman

    MontanaRifleman Well-Known Member

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  11. Outlaw6.0

    Outlaw6.0 Well-Known Member

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  12. beanur

    beanur Well-Known Member

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    I JUST GOT A vortex FFP.FOR HUNTING I HOPE I DIDNT GET THE WRONG ONE. OH WILL
     
  13. gamehawker

    gamehawker Well-Known Member

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    If you decide you made a mistake I think you should be able to sell the scope pretty quickly.
     
  14. beanur

    beanur Well-Known Member

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    Lets hope I didnt im mounting it this weekend and reloading some rounds for some down range shooting