Scope or Red Dot for turkey gun?

MJT700P

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Joined
Feb 28, 2018
Messages
50
Location
Ohio
I've been using a vortex venom red dot the last couple years and really like it. Its really light weight and doesn't make your shotgun top heavy like a scope does.
 

BKM

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Joined
Oct 1, 2013
Messages
82
Yeah what I said above
I guess I’m the odd one here. Shot fiber optic iron sights until my old eyes could no longer focus on the rear sight. Shotgun scopes were much more readily available then than they are now so I put one on and have had no problems with it unless I needed to shoot at something running or flying.
I just recently put a Trijicon MRO on my son’s Beneli. I haven’t hunted with it but it seems to be a very good sight and I believe I can acquire a moving target if the need arises. The only negatives I’ve noticed is the objective lens on the MRO really glares.
I fixed that with one of Trijicon’s filters. It does make the sight picture a little darker but not enough to bother me.
The other negative is having to remember to power the unit up every time u go hunting. It’s not a deal breaker but with a scope it’s always ready.
Hope this helps.
 

Rick Richard

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Joined
Jan 7, 2014
Messages
4,133
Location
North Carolina
I guess I’m the odd one here. Shot fiber optic iron sights until my old eyes could no longer focus on the rear sight. Shotgun scopes were much more readily available then than they are now so I put one on and have had no problems with it unless I needed to shoot at something running or flying.
I just recently put a Trijicon MRO on my son’s Beneli. I haven’t hunted with it but it seems to be a very good sight and I believe I can acquire a moving target if the need arises. The only negatives I’ve noticed is the objective lens on the MRO really glares.
I fixed that with one of Trijicon’s filters. It does make the sight picture a little darker but not enough to bother me.
The other negative is having to remember to power the unit up every time u go hunting. It’s not a deal breaker but with a scope it’s always ready.
Hope this helps.
So far, I am leaning towards a Swampfox Justice which has the shake awake feature. Still not totally decided though.
 

Frank in the Laurels

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Joined
Jul 15, 2007
Messages
872
All depends on your ability to focus clearly at various depths of field...as you age thus will change dramatically...myself I prefer the scope and if you can find a used one the Nikon turkey pro has a quick change focus on the back which works just fine..
 

Jjlo63

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LRH Team Member
Joined
Oct 18, 2018
Messages
99
Location
Illinois
471C73CA-76E2-403E-999C-8335BE2332B9.jpeg

I’ve killed a lot of turkeys with my super black eagle with a Burris speed bead.
 

turkeyguide

Member
Joined
Nov 15, 2013
Messages
24
Location
Pennsylvania
I've been guiding turkey hunters for 27 years and I'm a firm believer in red dots. Head position isn't an issue if the dot is on the bird it will hit, as opposed to someone lifting their head and only seeing the front bead and shooting over the bird. With a scope you still have parallax to consider, granted it's not as critical at short ranges, however I have had clients miss the most with beads, then a scope, and rarely with a dot. I have built 3 turkey guns for clients to use all with red dots and not one of them has ever missed a gobbler from as close as less than 20 yards to 50 yards. Granted these guns were built specifically for turkey hunting, special choke tubes, a lot of shell testing and patterning the guns. If I were you I would opt for a good red dot sight, get it dialed in and go kill turkeys.
Good luck!
 

Rick Richard

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Joined
Jan 7, 2014
Messages
4,133
Location
North Carolina
I've been guiding turkey hunters for 27 years and I'm a firm believer in red dots. Head position isn't an issue if the dot is on the bird it will hit, as opposed to someone lifting their head and only seeing the front bead and shooting over the bird. With a scope you still have parallax to consider, granted it's not as critical at short ranges, however I have had clients miss the most with beads, then a scope, and rarely with a dot. I have built 3 turkey guns for clients to use all with red dots and not one of them has ever missed a gobbler from as close as less than 20 yards to 50 yards. Granted these guns were built specifically for turkey hunting, special choke tubes, a lot of shell testing and patterning the guns. If I were you I would opt for a good red dot sight, get it dialed in and go kill turkeys.
Good luck!
Which brand or model would you recommend?
 
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