sako extractor on rem bolt

Discussion in 'Gunsmithing' started by kiwi3006, Jan 27, 2008.

  1. kiwi3006

    kiwi3006 Well-Known Member

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    I am thinking about rebarreling my remington 3006 to a 7 rem mag. I was speaking to a gunsmith about it and he wasn't that keen on the idea because he had heard about problems with the sako extractor coming off and hitting the shooter.
    He was saying that the rotating sleeve on a sako bolt is to block a gap that stops the extractor on a sako bolt coming back and hitting the shooter.
    Anyone else heard of this problem?

    Stu.
     
  2. James Jones

    James Jones Well-Known Member

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    if you can generate the pressure that it would take to get the Sako extractor out of the bolt and hit you then their gonna identify your body by figer prints !!

    i have heard of extractors comming out or loose that were poorly fitted but I've never herad of anybody getting hit with one.

    Alot of smiths don't like to use them cause its kind of pain to install them correctly.

    Ask around and see what its gonna cost you to have a Sako extractor installed , if its more than $100 (more than likely) then just buy a bolt from PT&G with has the extractor cut already fitted , this way you will be getting a better bolt thats already true , has the Sako extractor and you will have the benifit of a bolt that fits the action better ,like having it sleved all for around $200 with having the handel welded on and extractor installed , then you can easly sell your factroy bolt of $125.
     
  3. DCGS

    DCGS <strong>Official LRH SPONSOR</strong>

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    Sako Extractor

    I had one done by Hart. Works like new. The gun was a 280 rem, then a 300 win mag, now I am changing it to a 264 win mag.
     
  4. Fulldraw™

    Fulldraw™ Well-Known Member

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    Ditto!!!

     
  5. specweldtom

    specweldtom Well-Known Member

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    Kiwi, the Sako extractor is sort of a pain to install, but if fitted correctly, it works fine and won't fly out. The spring/plunger hole will make you sweat while you're drilling it, but the plunger itself holds the extractor in place securely. There is a tendency to rotate the extractor cut away from the locking lug, but in fact it has to be located at the base of the lug, or fired cases will try to eject too high and may hit the scope (or a windage knob) and bounce back into the ejection port. The factory extractor is aligned with the bottom locking lug and will cause ejection to be nearly horizontal. The Sako extractor at its best location still ejects at about 45 degrees above horizontal. I agree with your 'smith that I don't want to do one, but they do work fine.

    Good hunting, Tom
     
    Last edited: Aug 20, 2008
  6. mcmurray

    mcmurray Active Member

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    More Detals Please

    I've heard of this modification and I'm considering it for a cutom build that I am having done. What advantages do you gain from adding the Sako extractor?:cool:
     
  7. James Jones

    James Jones Well-Known Member

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    mcmurry , you get a better bit on the rim of the case with a stronger piece of steel rather than the dinky stamped unit that Remington offers , its just a stronger more robust extraction method. I actualy like the extractor on Savages better than the Remington.

    The next step up would be the M-16 style extractor which is better than the Sako (imo) and is also pinned in place , they generaly don't take as big of a bite on the case but they are very strong.

    I find it odd that Remington is getting a premium for their rifles that they haven't improved on in decades and their QC is slipping as well as their componets yet a "cheaper" "bargin" rilfe like the Howa or Weatherby Vanguard has a better bolt system all the way around , stiffer action yet cost a good bit less.
    I hate to say it but I guess thats the price of buying american now days.
     
  8. Fiftydriver

    Fiftydriver <strong>Official LRH Sponsor</strong>

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    IT is my shop policy to fit every Rem 700 receiver I accurize with a Sako extractor before it leaves the shop. When fitted correctly they are vastly superior to the factory extractor in every way.

    As far as an extractor coming out of the rifle, sure, its possible, but I have yet to see it happen personally and I have installed more then 300 of them over the last 5 years.

    With the right fixtures and a quality mill, its a 20 minute job and very worth the benefits.

    The way the Rem 700 is designed, there is no way an extractor that comes out of the rifle couldhit the shooter other then possibly in the trigger arm elbow, other then that no way it could get to the shooters face or eye from what I see unless there is serious receiver failure. In that case, even the factory extractor would probably hit you in the face.

    If that is a concern of yours or you are left handed shooting a right hand Rem 700 with this type of extractor then I recommend a pinned in extractor such as the Badger Ord extractor which simply can not be blown out of the bolt.

    There have been alot of wives tales spun about Sako extractor horror stories, for the most part they are started by smiths or so called smiths that do not know how to properly fit one or will not invest in the tooling to do this properly.

    Kirby Allen(50)
     
  9. kiwi3006

    kiwi3006 Well-Known Member

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    Thanks for all the replies, it sets my mind at rest and will go ahead with the rebarreling.

    Stu.
     
  10. JayIdaho

    JayIdaho Well-Known Member

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    There was a very sad post a few years ago on one of the gun boards. I think it was the "extremeaccuracy.com" board. A lefty lost his eye when a Sako extractor blew out of a Rem 700 that had been converted.
    I've removed the barrel on several 700s that have been fired with extreme overloads, usually caused by a very fast powder being accidentally used in a large case. The case head is deformed to the point that the primer pocket looks like it would accept a shotgun primer. The brass fills the inside of the bolt snout. I've seen magnum chambers expanded about .005 above normal in the case section, this makes the barrel difficult to unscrew, all of the way.
    When you see this, you understand what the "three rings of steel" that Remington mentions is all about.
    I will now do Savage bolt head conversions but no longer do the Sako conversions. I'm a Tool and Diemaker and am not challanged by the machining steps required to install Sako extractor or do Savage bolt head conversions. Flame away if you feel the need.
    You decide what you like. Opininions vary.
     
  11. Stormrider

    Stormrider Well-Known Member

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    I had one of those overloads that ruined the rifle. A Rem 700. Only things left that were any good were the bottom metal, mag and trigger. Receiver was bent, bolt was set back and bent and chamber was ovaled. Bolt had a Sako extractor in it and it never moved. Had to be taken out by unscrewing the barrel. Gunsmith said it took two barrel vices to do that. Really upset me.