Ruger Super Redhawk

scrmblr1982cj8

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Jul 14, 2013
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La Grange, KY
Just picked up a Ruger Super Redhawk in 44 mag. I've wanted one since I was a kid.

Anyone use them for hog hunting? After deer season ends in South Carolina, one can hunt hogs from an elevated stand with a handgun with iron sights and a barrel length less than 9". I've got a few ladder stands within 25 yards of bait piles, so I think this would be ideal for full moon nights this spring.
 

StrutNut

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Feb 5, 2015
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Blaine, MN
I used to but preferred the Freedom Arms 454 that I had for a couple of reasons. Accuracy and safety. I could half cock the FA and have the gun still be on safe and be able to quietly fully cock the handgun. I never could do that with the Super Redhawk so I was always faced with having to cock the handgun before game got too close to hear it. On the pluses that gun can take a pounding. Very well made and was plenty accurate, just not as accurate at the FA - that was a tack driver. I loaned out my Ruger to a friend that took a whitetail with it and made me an offer I couldnt refuse to keep it.
 

600BP

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Dec 20, 2009
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88
I have a Super Blackhawk 44 mag, and have used it on hogs. I typically shoot cast bullets out of my 41, 44, 500SW, and 50 B&M Alaskan. Cast bullets break bone, and bring them down quickly. You should have no trouble stacking the bacon with that revolver and the right bullet.

Regards,
Erik
 

JOHNNIE WALKER

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Apr 1, 2013
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I have a super Blackhawk with 7.5 barrel. I shot a 180 plus pound hog in the face with it at almost point blank range. It died. Very quickly. I handload and really like the 240gr nosler hollow point. It groups well and gives me excellent performance on game. I've killed a few deer with it. I shoot 23.6 gr of win296. I don't recommend the hornady 240 hollow points. I would have no problem shooting hogs with this pistol. The key is to use good bullets. I'm really wanting to try some Barnes, but haven't yet. The 44 mag is a very versitle round. Even though factory ammo is plentiful, reloading really opens up the possibilities. Rugers are built well and typically have plenty of room in the cylinders. You might be surprised what you can come up with.
Also, adding fiber optic sights really helps.
 

AKGuide

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Feb 17, 2013
Messages
254
Location
SW Alaska
A 300 grain hard cast gas check with 21.5 grains of either H110 or W296 has always shot well in any gun I put them through. Great penetration and terminal performance.

Reuben
 

Varmint Hunter

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Dec 26, 2001
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4,203
Location
Long Island, New York
I didn't like the 300's in my SRH revolver because it necessitated a higher front sight. That caused some trouble with the sight getting hung up in the sight tract of the holster. I switched back to the factory sight and standard weight bullets.

In the 44mag I preferred the 250gr Nosler Partition bullet. A great bullet but no longer available. However, Swift makes their A-Frame bonded bullet in 240gr and 280gr. I seriously doubt that any pig could stop one of these bullets.
 

Steve in PA

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Jul 30, 2011
Messages
11
Location
Luzerne County, PA
I've hunted with my scoped SRH in .44 Magnum for quite a few years. I use it for deer and bear here in PA. I've taken several deer with this handgun, but still waiting to take my first black bear. Maybe this year!

I use nothing but handloaded Hornady 240 or 300 grain XTP's. Love those rounds.

Our gun bear season comes in this Saturday and I'll be carrying my SRH loaded with the 300's.

This is a doe taken a few years ago at 75 yards using the 240 grain XTP's.

 
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