resize necks after pulling bullets?

Discussion in 'Reloading' started by big mike 2121, Dec 2, 2013.

  1. big mike 2121

    big mike 2121 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    168
    Joined:
    Dec 13, 2010
    Hey guys, Should I resize the necks of my brass if i pull the bullets after finding i made a mistake? Reloaded a couple and the neck tension seemed somewhat loose.
     
  2. g0rd0

    g0rd0 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    583
    Joined:
    Mar 9, 2012
    yes
     
  3. big mike 2121

    big mike 2121 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    168
    Joined:
    Dec 13, 2010
    thanks
     
  4. royinidaho

    royinidaho Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    8,901
    Joined:
    Jan 20, 2004
    I don't.

    Now it's 50-50:D
     
  5. blackdog

    blackdog Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    281
    Joined:
    Jan 14, 2011
    Pretty much the internet in a nutshell in only a couple of posts!! :D:rolleyes:
     
  6. woods

    woods Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    980
    Joined:
    Jun 4, 2006
  7. varmintH8R

    varmintH8R Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,123
    Joined:
    Dec 12, 2011
    If they seem loose, resize 'em.

    What's a bigger issue:

    They need to be resized and you don't?

    They don't need to be resized and you do?
     
  8. Shane1

    Shane1 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    279
    Joined:
    Jan 25, 2011
    I run them through at neck sizer without the expander in it just to be sure.
     
  9. Greyfox

    Greyfox Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    4,204
    Joined:
    Jan 21, 2008
    For me, it depends on the specific rifle, load, and use. There are a few factors for consideration like whether the brass is near needing to be annealed, and the felt seating tension of load, before and after. If it is a whole batch that needs to be pulled and my use is for match, or LR hunting, I'll resize all of them to be sure the seating tension is consistent. If it's one or two, I'll just load them without resizing and note them for use as fouling shots. I have rarely, if ever seen much difference in groups at 100 or 200 hundred yards, but with some rifles/loads I have seen differences in ES with pulled brass that hasn't been resized. For serious work, I'll always opt for peace of mind. The other thing to note is the condition of pulled bullets, and whether they were in any way deformed during the removal process. IMO.
     
  10. SidecarFlip

    SidecarFlip Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    4,182
    Joined:
    Dec 12, 2011
    +1 with Greyfox. If I pull any (we all make mistakes, better to pull it than chance it anytime), I 'feel' the way a new pill inserts into the case mouth by putting it in with my fingers. If it goes in easily (usually the case with multiple fitings and worked brass with little springback that is approaching the annealing stage, I use a NS die to 'tighten' the neck up (thats the only thing I use an NS die for btw).

    When I say finger insertion, I don't mean inserting the pill all the way, I mean partially and that becimes an exercise in opinion, something that needs to be 'felt' by the person.

    Keep in mind that all 90% of my rifle pills are boat tail and all my brass is VLD chamfered, so manual insertion will accor on all brass to a point.

    To pull pills, I use a Lee 'Factory Crimp Die', run the pill into the die with the pill in the jaws (but not the brass) and run the jaws down on the pill and retract the ram. That pulls the pill handily and leaves no mark, like the Grip-n-Pull without the tool. I'm cheap.