Interesting stock making method

cohunt

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interesting for sure, labor intensive for sure-- surprised they dont use cnc-- they make those full custom stocks for Olympic 22lr competition shooters-- wonder if that glue/sandwich method would work for large magnums?

Slovakia
 
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Doublezranch

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It does. That is how laminated stocks are made. 1/16 inch strips of birch, dyed, then epoxied together in a press.
 

Buck Fever

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That looks European. They have weird ideas about woodworking, using a chainsaw instead of a chop saw, no fence on their table saw, no router with templates, no copy lathe, no CNC.

I can understand the lack of a copy lathe and CNC but the rest is pretty weird.

I have to imagine that guy is from a family that has been doing woodworking for 400 years but some how they became disconnected from advances in woodworking tools.

I know a guy that got in to stock making about 20 or 25 years ago. Less than 10 years in he already had a copy lathe and was beginning to do CNC shaping. The last time I saw him, he had expanded a few times and was putting out beautiful furniture in bulk. He is in to military surplus more than match rifles so I would try to buy his seconds because my rifles look wrong with presentation grade wood. He also makes some fancy 10-22 dress up stocks that are every bit as complicated as a match rifle stock so there is nothing that archaic tools really do better than modern machinery.
 

cohunt

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It does. That is how laminated stocks are made. 1/16 inch strips of birch, dyed, then epoxied together in a press.
except they are thin laminate strips with the epoxy injected into the grain of the wood-- not thick slabs and wood glue ( Rakoll GXL-4 polyvinyl acetate glue in the video) https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Polyvinyl_acetate like in the video

I have no doubt that this method works for 22lr rifles-- Bear is world renowned for their Olympic competition stocks for Anschutz competion rifles--Ive just never seen it in a center-fire rifle stock
 

Ranger Rick

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It does. That is how laminated stocks are made. 1/16 inch strips of birch, dyed, then epoxied together in a press.
That is how
except they are thin laminate strips with the epoxy injected into the grain of the wood-- not thick slabs and wood glue ( Rakoll GXL-4 polyvinyl acetate glue in the video) https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Polyvinyl_acetate like in the video

I have no doubt that this method works for 22lr rifles-- Bear is world renowned for their Olympic competition stocks for Anschutz competion rifles--Ive just never seen it in a center-fire rifle stock
You’re right Cohunt. The lamination is very different between biathlon rifles and hunting rifles. Hunting rifle laminated stocks use much thinner laminates and are laminated horizontally (+ diagonally). The thinner thicknesses can even be bent. I have made curving wood stair rails via forming each 1/8” 8 - 12” piece and gluing with clamps every three inches. Soaking the wood facilitates bending and shaping multi-dimensional.
The biathlon stock has vertical, thicker laminates. It looks to me like clear Alder which is one of the lightest hardwoods. Biathletes crave lightness. Birch is a more common hunting rifle laminate along with many beautiful hardwoods.
Jerry, thanks for posting :)
 

J E Custom

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Here is a description of how gun stock laminates are made, and there benefits.

I started using them back in the 70s for match rifles for their strength, and at the time I just bought blanks and hand carved my own. I still have a few Reinhart fajen stocks on hunting rifles.


There are many different types of wood and other materials (Carbon fiber)used, and many different thicknesses of each laminate for strength. The thinner each laminate is, normally strength increases.

J E CUSTOM
 
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