Heart Attack

Muddyboots

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Joined
Feb 7, 2013
Messages
958
Location
Michigan
OK I bet I have your attention! Yes I had one in 2005 but I thought it would be worth while to talk about what actually happened which may be information that may save you or someone you know. I was talking to a fellow poster on another MI site and the subject came up and I thought I should recall it here on LRH as something that us "more mature" hunters may be at risk without knowing so.

My little story and I hope it is worthwhile for someone:
"September 2005, I was in Arkansas for a week on business and didn't feel very well. Nothing special but not right. Came home on 30th and went out bow hunting on opening day Sat. the 1st. Carried tree stand in 3/4 mile into swamp, killed doe. Told son and he said stay in tree a nice buck is coming to you. I watched the buck for short while and he never really gave me the perfect shot at 42 yards so I passed. It was opening day so I thought I had lots of time. My son saw me struggled a bit just field dressing her out and offered to drag her out for me. Not shooting the buck probably saved my life as well as my son dragging the doe out for me. Sunday came around and still didn't feel right. Went to Doc on Monday and ran some tests and all was well or so I thought. Monday evening I was in pole barn and didn't feel right again. Went to ER since I felt there was definitely wrong and could not shake that feeling "something bad is going to happen" or the sense of "impending doom". I felt like someone was behind me with a baseball bat ready to clobber me! They ran some tests and came back and told me they would have a room ready for me in 20 minutes in cardio vascular unit. Could have knocked me down with feather! Seems I had heart attack in preceding week. No chest or arm pains at all. BP runs 115/75 with 55 at rest pulse so go figure. I stated such to Doc and he said "ever hear of someone dying in their sleep?" OK that got my attention FAST!

I had an Angiogram, 5 arteries 90%+ blocked so got 5 stents and back in business in 3 weeks after PT. Released by cardiologist to hunt and climbed same tree 3 weeks after stents and was there to see my son arrow a terrific 8 pt'er, his first really big buck with bow. Life makes you think what is important in these times. Why am I telling you this story? I am here today due my own will to find out why I didn't feel right. So close to losing it all if I didn't listen to that little voice we all have that tells you when something isn't quite right. Don't assume all is OK if a Doc sends you home. If you don't feel right keep after it until you close it out. Don't be macho over this stuff. Do something about it. I recently lost a good friend who didn't listen to that little voice. You can't lose even if you are wrong. Take care guys and listen to that little voice. It may save your life. BTW - the Heart Association states the "impending doom" is a feeling that pending heart attack victims have reported consistently.
Safe hunting and long life."


Since I wrote this, my former optometrist was at a large family Thanksgiving dinner and he told me he had the awful feeling of dread and impending doom and mentally recalled my story. Stood up at table and said he was going to ER. They tried to change his mind but he didn't. He dragged his wife there and they ran the tests based upon the red flags he told them about as "feeling of dread". They came back with same story, "we have a bed for you in cardio lab"! He got 3 stents and was told he was on cusp of the "big one" and may not have made it. He listened to that little voice as well.

So I hope IF you ever have that "little voice" telling you something is not quite right, chase it down like a coyote on your land. My cardiologist tells me to keep hunting, it is apparently good for your health!

Safe Hunting to ALL!
 

flyguy1

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Joined
Oct 17, 2015
Messages
238
Location
Montana
Up to 45% of heart attack are "silent", that is, they do not have the classic symptoms we are told to look for.

"The sooner you get help for a heart attack, the better your chances for a complete recovery. Unfortunately, many people hesitate to get help, even if they suspect there’s something wrong.

Doctors, however, overwhelmingly encourage people to get help if they suspect they’re experiencing early heart attack symptoms.

Even if you’re wrong, going through some testing is better than suffering long-term heart damage or other health issues because you waited too long.

Heart attack symptoms vary from person to person and even from one heart attack to another. The important thing is to trust yourself. You know your body better than anyone. If something feels wrong, get emergency care right away.

According to the Society of Cardiovascular Patient Care, early heart attack symptoms occur in 50 percent of all people who have heart attacks. If you’re aware of the early symptoms, you may be able get treatment quickly enough to prevent heart damage.

Eighty-five percent of heart damage happens in the first two hours following a heart attack.

Early symptoms of heart attack can include the following:

  • mild pain or discomfort in your chest that may come and go, which is also called “stuttering” chest pain
  • pain in your shoulders, neck, and jaw
  • sweating
  • nausea or vomiting
  • lightheadedness or fainting
  • breathlessness
  • feeling of “impending doom”
  • severe anxiety or confusion
 

just_jon

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Joined
Dec 1, 2019
Messages
252
Location
Newville, PA
I too learned to listen to the voice after a life threatening episode. In October 2006, I was on a business trip in OH. I experienced crushing headaches all week, but brushed them aside to tend to my business. My coworker wanted to take me to the ER, but I refused because I did not want to be laid up 8 hours from home. Upon returning home, I was unable to get out of her car and things spun out of control and went dark. Upon waking from a medically induced coma 8 days later, I was told I experienced cardiac tamponade (fluid in the pericardium). Doc told me they keep a list of the 10 most critical patients and that I had been #1 from the minute I arrived with a BP of 60/40. Doctors think it was caused by a drug interaction (thyroid med and multivitamin) which was exacerbated by skipping breakfast and lunch most days while working 80-90 hours per week, but could not be certain.

At 49, my perceived invincibility was shattered. That was a good thing as I no longer take tomorrow for granted.
 

Ace Quackhunter

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Joined
Jan 17, 2020
Messages
214
Location
Norcross, GA
I too learned to listen to the voice after a life threatening episode. In October 2006, I was on a business trip in OH. I experienced crushing headaches all week, but brushed them aside to tend to my business. My coworker wanted to take me to the ER, but I refused because I did not want to be laid up 8 hours from home. Upon returning home, I was unable to get out of her car and things spun out of control and went dark. Upon waking from a medically induced coma 8 days later, I was told I experienced cardiac tamponade (fluid in the pericardium). Doc told me they keep a list of the 10 most critical patients and that I had been #1 from the minute I arrived with a BP of 60/40. Doctors think it was caused by a drug interaction (thyroid med and multivitamin) which was exacerbated by skipping breakfast and lunch most days while working 80-90 hours per week, but could not be certain.

At 49, my perceived invincibility was shattered. That was a good thing as I no longer take tomorrow for granted.
So far I have not had a heart problem and that may be next but after my last surgery to repair my knee I found out that I am not longer 10 ft tall and bullet proof. Though I have healed, I now walk with a limp, but I am still walking. Going up hill is okay, but the coming back down can be a real problem, I have fallen several times and the sharp rocks hurt when you land on them. My hunt is coming up in November and I have been walking an sweating in the Georgia heat to get ready, but I am concerned that I might be only able to hunt the flats. If the Elk are moving down that's is okay, but if not, don't know if I can pull the mountain anymore.

When I was 50 I traveled and ran a department and put in 60 plus ours a week. Now that plant is running a skeleton crew and the other two are still shut down, looks like I will be retiring. I am not happy about it and wanted to work a few more years but I might find a new job working from home. Take care of yourself, I have gone to way to many funerals for friends and coworkers as of late. It will make think about what is important in life.

Ace
 

Muddyboots

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Joined
Feb 7, 2013
Messages
958
Location
Michigan
Ace,
Try trekking poles out and you will love them especially for downhill stability. I have bought real pricey ones and didn't hold up too well to my size at 6'4" 255 but stumbled (pun intended 😂) onto these from WallyWorld in 2017 for a mule deer bow hunt in the Badlands by Medora. Not only did they hold up great but I am still using them now. Crazy how good they are for only $19. I did have to replace one of the rubber stops and used a cane replacement rubber pad with JB weld and so far so good. It is almost embarrassing to see how well they work for such a low price.They come in lime green or black.
LINK: Walmart Trekking Poles
 

Ace Quackhunter

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Joined
Jan 17, 2020
Messages
214
Location
Norcross, GA
Ace,
Try trekking poles out and you will love them especially for downhill stability. I have bought real pricey ones and didn't hold up too well to my size at 6'4" 255 but stumbled (pun intended 😂) onto these from WallyWorld in 2017 for a mule deer bow hunt in the Badlands by Medora. Not only did they hold up great but I am still using them now. Crazy how good they are for only $19. I did have to replace one of the rubber stops and used a cane replacement rubber pad with JB weld and so far so good. It is almost embarrassing to see how well they work for such a low price.They come in lime green or black.
LINK: Walmart Trekking Poles
Thanks Muddyboots, I will check them out. I have my "Moses Staff" that use now, a 6 ft Stanley fiberglass handle I found walking fresh Surveyor cut last year. While I am only 6'-0" tall, I tip the scale at 278 lbs. about 50 lbs. to much. I have never been a fan of Quads or 4-Wheeler's but I am starting to think they may not be a bad thing for getting out in the field. The wife says she will be going with me in November to make sure I don't get hurt, not sure how that will work out.
I will continue my walking and have given up "Soda's", Biscuits & Gravey, Beer, Sugar and snacks. I now have a vegetable cocktail, no not a Bloody Mary, two or three time a day. Next month will start with me wearing my boots followed by full camo and backpack that should help me cut a few more pounds. I would sling a rifle when I walk, but I afraid the cul-de-sac may get to upset with me. November will be here before I am ready and I will forget to pack something but that is okay. Just as long as I can go, I will keep trying.
 

LVJ76

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Joined
Feb 2, 2019
Messages
1,484
Location
Tucson, Arizona
Thanks for sharing Muddy. I ran into high triglycerides a few years ago, genetics, they were through the roof at 1,165, doc couldn't even get a reading on my cholesterol.

I take a prescription for them now and they are all good but just found out I have high cholesterol so now I need to watch what I eat and exercise more.

I definitely want to be around and care for my family so I'm going to take of myself.

Thanks again and God bless
 

Muddyboots

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Joined
Feb 7, 2013
Messages
958
Location
Michigan
Ace: the hardest thing I had to do was completely change my nutritional perspective that has to be permanent or it will never work for me. I started staying with my "altitude" diet for year around and it works for me.
Good carbs in the morning, no pastries, dognuts, etc at all. I buy oatmeal by the bulk pack at Costco and add dried fruit which HELPS a lot to change up the flavor and enticement.
Fruit, nuts like walnuts etc for lunch. Lots of fruit and it will never count against your calories either. Whole grain breads if I have a sandwich. But I have learned to really like snacking on all sorts of fruit. MI musk melons are among the best and I carve the "pulp" out and put into ziplock. They are so juicy it is like eating candy.
Dinner I try to stay with lean meats and vegetables and very little carbs at night.
ABSOLUTELY nothing after 6:30 PM to eat unless it is an occasional late meal for all those family things that pop up.
Hydrate such that I have to go every 2 hours or so and that has eliminated kidney stones and other issues with digestion.

Hang tough and you will succeed, just takes mental endurance!;) Which is very difficult now staying home and having snacks in front of you.

The best advice I can give though is simple, weigh yourself EVERY day in morning before you eat breakfast. Its sets your mental outlook for the day and gives you incentive to do whatever you need to do.

I was almost 300 pounds when I started changing up my nutrition and have stayed at 255 for about 10 years. Obviously I can still lose some more and still trying.

Be safe!
 

just_jon

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LRH Team Member
Joined
Dec 1, 2019
Messages
252
Location
Newville, PA
About three years ago, I was diagnosed with hereditary hemochromatosis (high iron). My ferritin level was 15 times higher than normal which doubles the risk of heart attack and liver cancer. I‘m glad my doctor caught it at my annual physical. Treatment required a change to diet (reduce red meat and drinking copious amounts of black tea) and weekly phlebotomies where 750 ml of blood is withdrawn. The increased risk factors caused me to eliminate red meat for two years hoping to expedite a return to normal levels. My last four quarterly tests have been within and the bloodletting ended last November. I’ve reintroduced small amounts of red meat back to my diet about six months ago with no jump in iron level. I’m plannng on working up to find my max load.

Worst part was cutting back my deer hunting because my heart was not in it since I could not enjoy the meat. Best part was spending my more time with my two springers chasing doves, ducks and pheasants.

Remember, life doesn‘t always fire a warning shot.
 

Ace Quackhunter

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 17, 2020
Messages
214
Location
Norcross, GA
Ace: the hardest thing I had to do was completely change my nutritional perspective that has to be permanent or it will never work for me. I started staying with my "altitude" diet for year around and it works for me.
Good carbs in the morning, no pastries, dognuts, etc at all. I buy oatmeal by the bulk pack at Costco and add dried fruit which HELPS a lot to change up the flavor and enticement.
Fruit, nuts like walnuts etc for lunch. Lots of fruit and it will never count against your calories either. Whole grain breads if I have a sandwich. But I have learned to really like snacking on all sorts of fruit. MI musk melons are among the best and I carve the "pulp" out and put into ziplock. They are so juicy it is like eating candy.
Dinner I try to stay with lean meats and vegetables and very little carbs at night.
ABSOLUTELY nothing after 6:30 PM to eat unless it is an occasional late meal for all those family things that pop up.
Hydrate such that I have to go every 2 hours or so and that has eliminated kidney stones and other issues with digestion.

Hang tough and you will succeed, just takes mental endurance!;) Which is very difficult now staying home and having snacks in front of you.

The best advice I can give though is simple, weigh yourself EVERY day in morning before you eat breakfast. Its sets your mental outlook for the day and gives you incentive to do whatever you need to do.

I was almost 300 pounds when I started changing up my nutrition and have stayed at 255 for about 10 years. Obviously I can still lose some more and still trying.

Be safe!
Thanks Muddy, I got a earful from the wife a doctor when I went last month for a checkup. My heart was good and my cholesterol was good too. Just my weight was up and they are worried I will become a Diabetic if I don't drop some pounds. When you have a schedule it make a difference in your day, week or lifetime and I have gone back to getting up at 6:00 am and starting my day. I have begun the oatmeal and fruit for breakfast thing now for a few weeks and I am getting used to it. Still miss eggs and bacon and some sour dough biscuits, but that is what hunting camp will be from now on. I have gotten better on snacks mostly fresh fruits now and no more junk in the middle of the day. Dinner is still my weakness, I am trying hard not to go back for seconds, but my wife is a great cook. My goal is to lose at least 1 lbs per week by November and I will have lost at least 20 lbs. for my hunt maybe more. That way I don't need to buy new 3x pants and shirts for my hunt because my camo from last year does not fit right now.
Wish me luck.

ACE
 

Gwine

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Joined
Mar 3, 2013
Messages
326
Location
Southern Oregon
Muddy, thanks for sharing your story.
This March I reached the age my dad was when he died of a massive heart attack. (44) I try to be aware of what my body is telling me, and understand that I am not invincible. Started seeing a doctor regularly a couple years ago to get in front of any potential issues. I can’t imagine leaving my wife and 3 boys alone.
 

A/C Guy

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Joined
Nov 16, 2008
Messages
224
Location
Apache Junction, Az
The government keeps mortality statistics for every generation and the 30 to 50 year olds have a higher mortality rate than every other age group except the over 70's crowd. Heart disease caused by obesity and diabetes with it's complications. But if you try telling the average obese person about their risks they accuse you of fat shaming.
The majority are completely unconcerned that they are killing themselves and they want free health care to completely pass the responsibility and financial costs to someone else.
 

P7M13

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Joined
Jan 5, 2016
Messages
258
Location
Orygun
Glad you listened to your body. 'Tis a good story to keep repeating.
I've lost two friends to cancer because they ignored their pain too long.
Ever'body's different.
I commonly have low blood pressure (<90/50), where the nurse will ask me if I'm feeling light headed. Last cholesterol test, I ate ice cream & drank beer the night before, and my blood test flagged me for abmormally low LDL levels.
My cause of death will likely be chronic recklessness, "hold my beer..."
 

WinMag4me

Member
Joined
Aug 29, 2018
Messages
21
Location
GA
Just over a week ago on August 8 I felt ill and mostly stayed in the bed all day. On the 9th I felt the same. My wife checked on me and I told her my legs ached. She examined my right leg and told me she thought I had a blood clot. She told me I needed to see a Dr.
I told her I would be fine. Couple hours later I decided to walk outside to my truck about 30 yards away. I made it to the truck and it hit me, I could not breathe. My wife called 911 and I went to hospital by ambulance.
Long story was I had a pulmonary embolism.
Blood clot from DVT traveled to multiple locations in both lungs. I should have taken the signs seriously. I have my wife and the Lord for being here today.
Don’t be stubborn and think you are less of a man if you think you need help. Sometimes the sooner you realize this can affect the outcome.
God Bless and take care.
 

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