First long range gun

Discussion in 'Long Range Hunting & Shooting' started by badger40, Nov 2, 2011.

  1. badger40

    badger40 Member

    Messages:
    20
    Joined:
    Nov 2, 2011
    I have a Thompson encore with a 22-250 barrel on it. I bought a tactical scope from Cabelas but don't know how to zero it or where to start. Any info or advise would be appreciated.
     
  2. rscott5028

    rscott5028 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,608
    Joined:
    Apr 18, 2010
    Mount the scope with good bases and rings. There are a lot of threads and articles about mounting scopes.

    Next, you need the scope bore sighted so that you can get on paper at 50 or 100 yds. Cabelas will mount and bore sight for a nominal fee.

    Normally, I just remove the bolt and sight through the bore with the rifle sand bagged in place and then align the cross hairs to where the bore is pointed.

    But, I don't think you can do that with an Encore since it's not a bolt action.

    Once it's bore sighted, you can test fire at a target at 50 or 100yds.

    If the first shot isn't on paper, move closer.

    Assuming the first shot is on paper, shoot 2 more for a 3 shot group to make sure it's consistent. Then compute how many clicks up/down/left/right and make your adjustment.

    Most scopes are 1/4" per click at 100yds. If you're shooting 50 yds instead, then you need twice as many clicks.

    The Up direction indicator on the turret means that turning in that direction will move your bullet impact Up on the target. Same goes for the windage adjustment. The direction indicated refers to the effect it will have on your POI or point of impact.

    When you think you are close to the bullseye, let the barrel cool down and shoot a 3 shot group at a clean target.

    Hope this helps.
    -- richard
     
  3. badger40

    badger40 Member

    Messages:
    20
    Joined:
    Nov 2, 2011
    Thank you for the help!
     
  4. 82ndreddevil

    82ndreddevil Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    96
    Joined:
    Sep 9, 2011
    That has got to be the most common sense and simple answer I have seen to such a question. Many people like to flex their brain power and make things very technical and confusing. I zero my rifles the same way. The only thing I would add to that is to keep that barrel cool. I take my time between shots to keep it from heating up and throwing rounds. I also like to do some dry firing as a form of practiceing a consistent trigger pull.
     
  5. badger40

    badger40 Member

    Messages:
    20
    Joined:
    Nov 2, 2011
    I am going to try it out this weekend. Thank you for the help!
     
  6. WildRose

    WildRose Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    10,037
    Joined:
    Feb 3, 2011
    Badger are you goign to be shooting at a regular gun range that has an on site gunshop?

    Or are you just going to be winging it out in the woods on your own?
     
  7. badger40

    badger40 Member

    Messages:
    20
    Joined:
    Nov 2, 2011
    Just shoot on my own.
     
  8. WildRose

    WildRose Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    10,037
    Joined:
    Feb 3, 2011
    Well that makes it a little tougher. If you have someone that knows what they are doing to help you get started it makes a big difference.

    When you go to mount your scope be sure not to over torque the allen nuts. They'll snap right off on you.

    as a general rule if you are using a regular small L Shaped alled wrench as soon as it begins to flex you have them tight enough.

    When I say that I mean use the long end to run them down and just get them gently snugged. When you go to your final tightening phase, flip it over using the short end as the driver and hold the long side. When it then starts to flex and the nut stops moving you're probably about done.

    Tighten them one at a time in an X Shaped pattern until each is torqued the same.

    You've got some good directions above for the rest.
     
  9. badger40

    badger40 Member

    Messages:
    20
    Joined:
    Nov 2, 2011
    I agree. Thank you for the help. This is a great web site!