devcon

Bigeclipse

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I was curious how much of the 1lb jar I should mix up to do a full bedding job on a laminate stock for a savage rifle. I will be grinding out about an 1/8th inch deep of wood everywhere...except where the recoil lug will tough the wood (I will grind out a good deal more so ewill be a solid wall of bedding compound) yes I know I want to have too much than too little mixed but I literally have no idea how much I will need. Will I use most of the jar and should just mix it all? Will I only need half and should save the other half for another job later? I will also be bedding some pillars in but heard this uses very little. Thoughts?
 

Browninglover1

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I used 1/3 of can of the steel puddy and it was plenty to bed a rifle. I want to say it was 3 rounded plastic spoons of the main part and 1 rounded spoon of the hardener.
 

Dosh

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Big, I've never needed more than 2 oz. for an average bedding. Devcon is one of the top bedding compounds along with Marine-Tex. good luck
 

Bigeclipse

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Are you using the putty or the liquid form and how large is the container? Mixing up a couple of ounces doesn't waste much. Mixing a pound is another story.

I haven't actually purchased it yet but it's the one you can find for about 40 bucks that states it is like a 1 pound can/plastic tub thing. I believe it is the putty kind.
 

FearNoWind

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Well, if you don't want to WAG the amount you'll need you could tape some cardboard dams inside the opening you want to fill, pour in some rice and use a measuring cup to estimate how many ounces you'll need and increase that by an ounce or so to make sure you don't run short. The object of bedding is to provide a stable base for the action, not to mold a new stock section. IMO you're going to a lot of unnecessary extra work by digging out stock material.
 

Bigeclipse

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Well, if you don't want to WAG the amount you'll need you could tape some cardboard dams inside the opening you want to fill, pour in some rice and use a measuring cup to estimate how many ounces you'll need and increase that by an ounce or so to make sure you don't run short. The object of bedding is to provide a stable base for the action, not to mold a new stock section. IMO you're going to a lot of unnecessary extra work by digging out stock material.

But I thought it was always recommended to dig out about an eighth inch or so deep where the action touches and a bit more where the recoil lug meets
 

Dr. Vette

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But I thought it was always recommended to dig out about an eighth inch or so deep where the action touches and a bit more where the recoil lug meets
Dig out no more than you need to in order to slip a piece of paper between the action and the stock. You don't want wood hitting metal, and you want more-or-less uniform thickness. Anything else is a waste of time and effort.
 

maninthemaze

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In the videos by Richard Franklin, master gunsmith, that I have. He states that you only need to bed the area behind the recoil lug and around the pillars, everything in between is just "look pretty" And the Devcon to use is the 10110 kind. Just my opinion and worth the price charged.
 

Bigeclipse

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In the videos by Richard Franklin, master gunsmith, that I have. He states that you only need to bed the area behind the recoil lug and around the pillars, everything in between is just "look pretty" And the Devcon to use is the 10110 kind. Just my opinion and worth the price charged.

That was what I was intending to do...unless the wood also touches the sides of the action as well then I will sand a bit out there and if it looks bad I'll bed it to improve looks but I have heard exactly what you just posted that important parts are recoil lug area and action screw areas.
 

orwapitihunter

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500 to 800 gr of putty covers most of my jobs.
Devcon 10110 has a 9 to 1 mix ratio.
I put a piece of card stock on my Chargemaster scale and then zero it.
Scoop out the putty on to the card stock.
Multiply the weight of the putty by 1.11
Now scoop hardener on the card next to the putty.
When the scale reads the number you calculated you are there.
Example...
Scale reads 658.3 gr
658.3 X 1.11 = 730.7 gr
730.7 gr is the combined weight of your hardener and putty.

At least that's how I do it.
 

mountainman56

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I have used the T.L.A.R. (that looks about right) method of measuring bedding compound for 40 years. I guess I should measure one time so I could give an educated guess on volume. Seems total volume would be about 2 heaped tablespoons. I use acraglass gel mostly because that's what I'm familiar with and also because the base and hardener are mxed in equal amounts. Makes it a lot easier to eyeball.
 

DickE

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A few years ago I got Richard Franklin's video on stress free pillar bedding, haven't wavered much from his instructions since, have done maybe 30-40 jobs since then. If it's a repeater, just the front around the lug area, and the pillars, the rest can be free floated. If it's a single shot, yes about a third of the jar is more than enough, but don't cut yourself short, better to have a little excess than not enough. Yes, do re-leave the wood underneath about 1/8" that will insure the Devcon 10110 (1LB.)will not flake out as time goes by. Buy plenty of q-tips. Enco has a good price on the Devcon
 

J E Custom

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The nice thing about the long pot life compounds is the fact that you can mix up a small amount and if it is not enough to fill where the action pushes some out, you can mix up a little bit more and make up the areas that need more before it starts to react/kick off.

just make sure you have enough to fill before placing the action in the bedding. (It damages the release agent or wax and may glue the action in the stock.

If your not sure about the correct amount use more.

J E CUSTOM
 
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