Corn Tumbling Media in my Charge

budlight

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Try running your brass for about two hours instead of three you won’t get as much neck peening, I still use the dry media tumblers and Walnut hull media from Harbor freight to polish after tumbling with wet pins
Okay, I haven't noticed a problem and they come out looking like brand new. The big thing is that they are totally clean, dry, and lube free.
 

338 dude

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Okay, I haven't noticed a problem and they come out looking like brand new. The big thing is that they are totally clean, dry, and lube free.
If you ever noticed them tarnishing after a while or fingerprints because they are so clean try tumbling them in Walnut hull media with a little metal polish added. After wet tumbling
D2526D48-5679-4D91-ACC9-4E44B9D42DE8.jpeg
 

budlight

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I've got the answer to long time shine. You run enough water through your cases and stainless media to get all the black water and soap out. Then you add a table spoon of AutoZone cheap NU Finish car polish liquid and tumble for a 30 minutes.

It make the cases air tight and they don't tarnish with time. I only do that to specialty rounds that i might have sitting around for a long time like a big run of heavy ELD rounds.
 

Muddyboots

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The reptilian that I bought (off amazon) must not be fine enough. I do occasionally have media stuck in the flash holes. Don't let your guard down.
Its not perfect but the frequency of the flash holes plugging is considerably lower since I started using the reptilian fine ground media. When I start to pull brass from the vibratory, I just touch the side of the vibrator with the brass neck down to facilitate the emptying of the case. The vibration from the side of the bowl really helps even kicking out flash hole stuff.
 

MagnumManiac

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I discovered a long time ago if I tumble my brass with the spent primer in place I don’t get any media in the flash hole. I also moved from walnut shell to corn cob, the reason was the dust….at least 10 times more dust with the rouge additive in the walnut.
I clean my primer pockets with my Lee primer pocket cleaner in a drill and just spin it up and run each case over it for a second or two.
I actually bought a separater that runs on my Lyman case tumbler….tried the lid in a 2.5 gallon bucket and it worked….but was way too slow for me.
Tried wet tumbling and sonic cleaning, I like my case necks lubed with graphite, both of these methods clean the brass too much and are actually removing metal with stainless pins.
Do not like drying wet brass either…far better things to do with my time.

Cheers.
 

ntsqd

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I did switch to leaving the primers in and using a Lee Universal De-Cap die after tumbling.

My wife has SS pins & rods in her own bowl for her silver-smithing and I tried them on some junk brass just to see how they worked. I didn't like the results. Seemed like the brass was work-hardened by that process. I can't quantify why it felt like that, it just did. Could be a figment of my imagination, but I don't think so.
 

jbs2014

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If you ever noticed them tarnishing after a while or fingerprints because they are so clean try tumbling them in Walnut hull media with a little metal polish added. After wet tumblingView attachment 287614
That is kind of what I do except I use the ultrasonic cleaner instead of the stainless steel pins. For some reason when I put .50 BMG in the stainless steel tumbler it get beat worse than the French Army. I am not sure my .408 brass would fare much better.

Regarding the OP, I take each case out of the walnut media tumbler and empty and inspect one at a time. Probably not the most efficient way to do things but it works for me.
 

Painless300

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If you have not read Orkan's article on brass cleaning I would encourage you to do so. Ive been using wet tumbling for several years and have always had issues with peened case mouths and varying seating pressure. After speaking with Orkan about this very subject I just ordered and new Thumbler UV18 from Midway and the rice that is linked in this article from Amazon to give the rice method a try. The combination of the carbon on the inside of the necks and the rice give a certain lubricity which really smooths out the seating pressure that will result in much better performance down range.

 

budlight

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I resize, SS tumble, I anneal every so often, and have tried dipping my case necks in graphite. Also when I was competitive shooting I was big on moly tumble coated pills. I never had a problem with neck tension I have no scientific proof to offer that it works any better than tumbling in rice, corn cob, red coated walnut shells lizard bedding, ninja throwing stars, or soda can pop tops. I do know that it works for me. I don't have any unexplained fliers. I can't say whether it's the annealing, the graphite, the bushing die, the stainless media. But for the best internal and external cleaning you can't beat the wet tumble.

I got out my best magnifying glass and was looking inside of my 308 case necks for any brass damage. It would be the worst case because of diameter and velocity of the SS pins. I couldn't see any denting inside or outside the case. The outside could be feasibly be getting a 6 inch drop. But you have to add in water cushioning. So sometimes you have to wave the BS meter
 

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Painless300

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Hopefully one of these guys that has invested in the new AMP Press will run some tests on different cleaning methods and shed some light on this highly debated topic. Love to see unbiased test results and this new press should be able to deliver some very good results.
 

ntsqd

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I doubt that there will be a convergence on brass cleaning methods any time soon. I expect that such a convergence will happen right about the time that we all agree on the best way (method + process + tool) to anneal case necks.

In other words not likely in my lifetime. The reality is that there is more than one path to get to the desired result. In that situation there is no single "Best Way", there is only the way that works best for you.
 

Upsidedownjack

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For what it’s worth? Been using about a 50/50 mix of Walnut and Corncob. I still make sure “every” flash hole is cleared. Then if the first time, trim LOA, camphor inside and out, and also brush the primer pocket! And trim the inside of Flash hole and if military brass remove crimp! Maybe not all in that order, but you get the Idea!
 

budlight

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When I'm out quading in Arizona you come across old shooting areas out in the dessert. The sun bakes older brass cases to black. One day I picked up about 600 223 and 243 cases. All the 223 brass was Lake City.

My wet tumbler turned them all into beautiful brand new looking cases. No media or my ultrasonic can do that!

I do lots of 223 and 308 range pickup. The best item for primer pockets is the $99 dollar Dillon swager.

 

Orange Dust

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I doubt that there will be a convergence on brass cleaning methods any time soon. I expect that such a convergence will happen right about the time that we all agree on the best way (method + process + tool) to anneal case necks.

In other words not likely in my lifetime. The reality is that there is more than one path to get to the desired result. In that situation there is no single "Best Way", there is only the way that works best for you.
Right after that we will all agree on scopes and actions. Seriously, this is much of why our hobby is so confusing to beginners. We skin cats from both ends, in the middle, around the sides and up the back.
 

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