Bull elk- fit to eat?

Discussion in 'Cooks' Corner' started by trueblue, Oct 24, 2014.


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  1. Plinker147

    Plinker147 Well-Known Member

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    Older bulls or real rutting bulls I only keep backstraps and tenderloins as steaks. I grind the rest. All the tricks listed above help but they can still be tuff. Rag horns are the best eating and post rut winter bulls seem to be not as tuff.

    Aging is a must if your going to keep steaks off older bulls.
     
  2. lancetkenyon

    lancetkenyon Well-Known Member

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    Very little fat marbling=dense meat=tougher than beef.
    Age 14 days, marinade with a vinegar/oil based mix to help break down muscle but keep moisture in, cook medium rare, enjoy!

    I have not purchased beef in about 8 years except the rare occasion we find some USDA Prime Ribeyes. Deer/pronghorn/elk make up 97% of our red meat diet.
     
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  3. D in lv

    D in lv Member

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    Lots of good suggestions here. We noticed the same problem with adult bulls. If you are able to leave the bone in it really helps. Often because of terrain and distance that is not practicle. Leave the thigh bone in rear quarters when possible can. Run through the cuber twice especially cuts with bones out. Cut steaks thin, cook hot and fast. However its elk not baby beef.
     
  4. LVJ76

    LVJ76 Well-Known Member

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    To your point about vinegar, Adobo, which is made with different types of chiles usually has a bit of "vinegar" on it, it seals the moisture, tenderizes the meat and also gives it a great flavor.
     
  5. MkJose

    MkJose SCAMMER

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    I have worked with my hands for 4 decades. Mechanicing on heavy equip, trucks, laying pipe, running equipment, etc... They're rough, tough and have served me well. But you should focus on the tenderizer. Invariably your gonna have tough meat sometimes, no marinade or powder is gonna do what a mechanical tenderizer will do. I tried the pin style and they are waste of money. Once I found the blade style tenderizer it made all the difference in the world. As long as you cook with higher heat and not cook the meat more than medium and it will be moist. If you cook it well done it will be dry. Mike
     
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  6. Backcountry_IDN

    Backcountry_IDN Well-Known Member

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    In my experience and maybe its just me, my 8 year old bull I shot this past season tasted the exact same as my uncles calf he shot. Maybe its just me.

    But I marinate my elk steaks for 2 full days and they fall apart. Try some good marinade. I use adolfs or (kind of funny) lemon pepper salad dressing.
     
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  7. 26Reload

    26Reload Well-Known Member

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    If it's too tough for you don't hunt them.....leavexthem for us REAL men to ruin our teeth on.......ha....

    Hanging an animal gives the meat timexto break down...the red color of meat is the riboflavin..which as humans we also have if the muscle is worked and grows bigger....the bigger the muscle the more riboflavin the longer it takes to 'drain the meat'.....the longer you hang the meat or cooled in a refridge the more break down occurs....making the meat more tender...but if you prefer to gum you meat...you will still need to tenderize or grind it into hamburger(and i use 1# of smoked bacon to 10# of fresh meat)...eat not only eats deliciously....the aroma sends every dog, cat, and human around into a frenzy............
     
  8. SMK1000plus

    SMK1000plus Well-Known Member

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    We have 12'x16' walk-in cooler we keep at 36°F, that we hang our skinned and quatered elk in. We pack them with ice, in a large freezer that we use as a giant cooler, until we can get them there. We let them hang at least 21 days, to as long as 36 days. Deer we hang whole, skinned and field dressed, usually for 16 to 20 days. Makes an unbelievable difference!
     
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  9. 26Reload

    26Reload Well-Known Member

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    Hanging critters is all time vs decomposition......if your lucky enough to have a refrigerated box they can hang longer........no cooler..hope for cooler weather........no cool weather..refridge.......just keep it above freezing or it is a wasted effort....
     
  10. TexSavage

    TexSavage Well-Known Member

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    Jacard Needle. My Wife has had major trouble with her teeth for years, so bad she has all but quit eating steak from any animal. Enter the Jacard Needle, a mechanical tenderizer that has 3 rows of razor teeth. You push down on it and those needle teeth tenderize it. Works like a charm and now the wife eats steak or any other meat I use the Jacard on with no issues.
     
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  11. just country

    just country Well-Known Member

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    morning, if u question the meat. I will pay the shipping
    to TX. please advise. justme gbot tum
     
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  12. Laelkhunter

    Laelkhunter Well-Known Member

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    Jacard is highly recommended. You can also use it on domestic cuts of meat (including pork, chicken breasts, etc).
     
  13. Elkeater

    Elkeater Well-Known Member

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    Our red meat diet at my house is made up of 97% wild game. Elk, deer, antelope or anything else I can get a tag for. I killed a good 6x6 bull a couple years ago (mostly shoot cows since I can get tags so easy) and he ate just as good as any cow I’ve shot. I dry aged the meat at 33-38 degrees for 14 days then processed him. I cut all my usual cuts. Sirloin steaks, backstrap, tenderloin, sirloin tip, round roasts, shoulder roasts, burger, shanks, etc and that was one of the best elk we’ve eaten. And we’ve eaten a lot of elk. Aside from aging I also find that a good marinade that involves citrus juice (think lime) or vinegar seems to really make for a good steak.
     
  14. KurtB

    KurtB Well-Known Member

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    I can any game that is kind of tough in 1 quart or pint jars. It is then useful in a large variety of dishes. Like has been mentioned, save the best cuts for steaks, can as much chunk meat as you can use, and grind the rest. I also can a bit of the ground for fast easy meals as well. We have enjoyed elk a lot as well as a number of old mule deer bucks.