Eating Aoudad

flyguy1

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I’m not sure. it’s worth a try. My only concern would be that the canning process may destroy the enzymes you need for this to work.
You are correct. Bromelain, the enzyme which tenderizes meat (or papain which comes from papayas) is destroyed by the heat of canning.

Nice going on bringing the meat home, and you are quite the chef.
 

flyguy1

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By the way, if you have a roast maybe smoke low and slow at 225-275 (more arguments about temp than bullets or Leupold's don't track); maybe inject with some beef broth if you think it will be too dry. Would guess internal temp of 195-205, kind of like brisket. Maybe pink butcher paper a la Franklin at 4 hours. You know they used to throw briskets away.
 

pttp

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Oct 11, 2017
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Elkeater layed out a good scenario about finding a butcher beforehand and have him/her prepare the meat for shipping. Arrange shipping to fit your schedule. Frozen and put in polystyrene coolers with dry ice. Overland shipping up to 3 days. Omaha Steaks has been doing it for years.
 

Goldengun

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oklahoma
So @shooter7 and I recently went Aoudad hunting in west Texas https://www.longrangehunting.com/threads/auodad-hunt-at-the-indio-ranch.234207/

Before our hunt the question of eating Aoudad came up with many folks telling us to cape them out cut off the head and leave it for the buzzards because the coyotes won’t even eat them.

Well not being the kind of guys to kill stuff and let it go to waste we cut our sheep up on the side of the mountain just like anything else and headed straight back to camp and got the meat on ice ASAP. I’m a pretty firm believer that most folks that say an animal isn’t good ( many folks won’t touch antelope!) is due to poor meat handling in the field.

Now that I’m back home the meat has aged (not rotted) for a couple weeks and yesterday morning I got it cut up and put away and tested a couple small sirloin tip pieces.

Here’s what I did. Marinated for 4 hours in orange juice, rinsed clean, and lightly seasoned with Montreal steak seasoning, then seared in a cast iron skillet.

Here’s what I found.
View attachment 173259
Done rare/medium rare
Flavor was excellent. I can compare it to pronghorn the best. Even my wife said it tasted great.
A couple of pieces that were closer to the end of the muscle that had more connective tissue were a bit chewy kind of like bull elk can be. I think if I stick to the cleanest cuts such and sirloin, backstrap, or rounds the steaks will be good the rest I’m sure will make a tasty burger or roast or snack sticks or jerky or anything like that.

So before you decide an animal isn’t worth eating before you’ve tried it I say give it a shot!

I know shooter7 has eaten some of his too so maybe he’ll chime in here as well and I’ll update the thread as I go along and let you all know the results.
I concur. I've shot and eaten exactly one pronghorn(not exactly a large sample) in my life and it was as good if not better than any venison I have ever had. My guess is 80/90 degree late summer temperatures are not adequately accounted for. I think a lot of meat gets ruined because hunters want to go get their truck, load up the animal, show it off to their friends and family, etc., before taking it home or elsewhere to be gutted/butchered. I don't care how hot or cold it is, nothing is happening, until I dress my harvest.
 

bdyal1972

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No where near the woods. I miss it
So @shooter7 and I recently went Aoudad hunting in west Texas https://www.longrangehunting.com/threads/auodad-hunt-at-the-indio-ranch.234207/

Before our hunt the question of eating Aoudad came up with many folks telling us to cape them out cut off the head and leave it for the buzzards because the coyotes won’t even eat them.

Well not being the kind of guys to kill stuff and let it go to waste we cut our sheep up on the side of the mountain just like anything else and headed straight back to camp and got the meat on ice ASAP. I’m a pretty firm believer that most folks that say an animal isn’t good ( many folks won’t touch antelope!) is due to poor meat handling in the field.

Now that I’m back home the meat has aged (not rotted) for a couple weeks and yesterday morning I got it cut up and put away and tested a couple small sirloin tip pieces.

Here’s what I did. Marinated for 4 hours in orange juice, rinsed clean, and lightly seasoned with Montreal steak seasoning, then seared in a cast iron skillet.

Here’s what I found.
View attachment 173259
Done rare/medium rare
Flavor was excellent. I can compare it to pronghorn the best. Even my wife said it tasted great.
A couple of pieces that were closer to the end of the muscle that had more connective tissue were a bit chewy kind of like bull elk can be. I think if I stick to the cleanest cuts such and sirloin, backstrap, or rounds the steaks will be good the rest I’m sure will make a tasty burger or roast or snack sticks or jerky or anything like that.

So before you decide an animal isn’t worth eating before you’ve tried it I say give it a shot!

I know shooter7 has eaten some of his too so maybe he’ll chime in here as well and I’ll update the thread as I go along and let you all know the results.



Kudos on an excellent worded description!!!
 

bdyal1972

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Messages
243
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No where near the woods. I miss it
Forty years ago when I started hunting black bears in Canada virtually no one ate bear. Bear meat wasn't even used for bait because the outfitters said "even bears won't eat bear meat". Today a very high percentage of bear hunters take their meat home.

A few years ago I was in Utah hunting mountain lions. A really nice tom was taken and my buddy was committed to taking some meat home to try. I generally don't eat predators so I passed. But .... my friend marinated and grilled up some of the meat and said it was excellent, kind of tasted like pork.

You just never know until you try.

COUGAR = YUMMY!!!
 

bdyal1972

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No where near the woods. I miss it
So far I've only eaten 3 steaks from my sheep. The first one was a "control" steak. I cut it, put salt, pepper and garlic on it and seared it to a medium rare.


The flavor was good. I would say its comparable to elk. It was kind of tough. It was far from inedible but anyone that's shot and ate a 10 year old cow elk would probably recognize the flavor and texture.


This was not unexpected. Our guide said all 3 of our sheep were likely 10-12 years old.



The next two steaks, I seasoned and cooked the same way. I did however try a new tenderizing method.


I was browsing YouTube and stumled across a channel called Guga Foods. The guy is a grill master. I saw one video where he was using pureed pineapple to tenderize tough cuts. He said it worked and I gave it a shot.


The first steak I marinated in the pineapple for 2.5 hours and then rinsed off the all the pineapple. The second steak I let marinate for 12 full hours.


The 2.5 hour steak turned out great. Nice and tender and once again with a flavor I thought was comparable to elk. The 12 hour steak was actually mushy. It had a good flavor with a slight pineapple sweetness to it but the texture was off. It was too soft for my personal preference but still good.


Like most wild game, the auodad is very lean. Its definitely easy to overcook and dry them out. In most wild game I prefer a quick, hard sear. The auodad is no different. I look forward to eating more of it.

Below is a picture of the marinated steaks. The one on the left is the 2.5 hour and the one on the right is the 12. View attachment 173312

VERY NICE
 

bdyal1972

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Messages
243
Location
No where near the woods. I miss it
I concur. I've shot and eaten exactly one pronghorn(not exactly a large sample) in my life and it was as good if not better than any venison I have ever had. My guess is 80/90 degree late summer temperatures are not adequately accounted for. I think a lot of meat gets ruined because hunters want to go get their truck, load up the animal, show it off to their friends and family, etc., before taking it home or elsewhere to be gutted/butchered. I don't care how hot or cold it is, nothing is happening, until I dress my harvest.

The first roosevelt I ever ate with "bone sour"

Tasted like "##s"

Made me want to hurl! My Godfather aged his deer and elk the way they did in Germany, hang carcass in the shade, in muslin or cotton under the house, leave until it is 100% fuzzy!!!! Wipe down with cider vinegar and cut of fuzzy stuff.....

To say thats STRONG TASTE!!!!
I LIKED IT... sort of



Shot on a 65deg day in the RAIN, CUT IN HALF, HUNG UP, butchrted 3 , 4 AND 5 DAYS LATER...

Bone sour KILLED IT...

Thats how that whole family liked it...

They knew no better...
 

Goldengun

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Mar 19, 2019
Messages
54
Location
oklahoma
The first roosevelt I ever ate with "bone sour"

Tasted like "##s"

Made me want to hurl! My Godfather aged his deer and elk the way they did in Germany, hang carcass in the shade, in muslin or cotton under the house, leave until it is 100% fuzzy!!!! Wipe down with cider vinegar and cut of fuzzy stuff.....

To say thats STRONG TASTE!!!!
I LIKED IT... sort of



Shot on a 65deg day in the RAIN, CUT IN HALF, HUNG UP, butchrted 3 , 4 AND 5 DAYS LATER...

Bone sour KILLED IT...

Thats how that whole family liked it...

They knew no better...
I live in western Oklahoma, and early season is just hot. I've lost count of how many deer/hogs I've let walk because I don't want to take a chance and ruin the meat. I don't like to take anything to the butcher until after I've hung it in my old barn for 4 or 5 days at least, and that takes cooler weather. It's worked for me so far. Trying to get set up to do all my own butchering, but i mostly need a cooler.
 

bdyal1972

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Messages
243
Location
No where near the woods. I miss it
I live in western Oklahoma, and early season is just hot. I've lost count of how many deer/hogs I've let walk because I don't want to take a chance and ruin the meat. I don't like to take anything to the butcher until after I've hung it in my old barn for 4 or 5 days at least, and that takes cooler weather. It's worked for me so far. Trying to get set up to do all my own butchering, but i mostly need a cooler.

In Western Kansas ( Scott city leiota)

I found boning the deer out asap, hanging meat in cotton bags in shade 2 maybe 3 days max at 90deg worked fine.

I rotated the position of the meat in the bags every morning and night
 

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