Bear protection handguns?

wilkup

Well-Known Member
Joined
Dec 2, 2013
Messages
1,288
Location
Cle Elum, WA
Kenai is an excellent holster but it did not work well for my Glock 40. It was too tight and I cannot take it out of the holster without holding the holster or strap. My gunsmith has the same handgun but had to some mod with it. I ended up with a Diamond Outdoors holster and it ones with mad holder for half the price. But best of all I can pull it out of foster easily with one hand. Cheers!
I’d love if a company offered the same nylon webbing for a harness system as the Gunfighter Kenai with the leather Diamond uses for the actual holster. I’d definitely buy one and probably pack my Blackhawk more often if that were an option.
 

phorwath

Well-Known Member
Joined
Apr 4, 2005
Messages
7,281
Location
Alaska
Kenai is an excellent holster but it did not work well for my Glock 40. It was too tight and I cannot take it out of the holster without holding the holster or strap. My gunsmith has the same handgun but had to some mod with it. I ended up with a Diamond Outdoors holster and it ones with mad holder for half the price. But best of all I can pull it out of foster easily with one hand. Cheers!
We're finding a similar issue removing .454 Ruger revolvers from the Kenai holster. You'll never have a revolver fall free of this holster. They're held in VERY tightly. Takes quite a yank to pop them free. There's a positive side to it, and a negative.
But I don't have to use both hands to yank the revolver free when strapped to my chest. So not quite as bad as you experienced with your Glock. A healthy one-handed yank will clear my revolver.
 

Ol' Red

Well-Known Member
Joined
Nov 28, 2018
Messages
678
Location
Wyoming
What's that old story about the 22LR being a great bear gun...........for shooting your girlfriend in the knee as you run from a bear. I image that's why many girls carry .380s. :) :) :)
Back about page 16, I was was going find a bear, kick him in the crouch and use a .22 to defend myself. Just to prove it could not be done, and I would not have to see another argument about bear protection. But the last two days I have looked forward to the humor that's shown up here on this thread. For all that live and hunt in bear territory, carry what makes you feel comfortable and safe. For those that don't - Ruger has a pretty cool looking .22 revolver out.
 
Last edited:

HARPERC

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 28, 2011
Messages
6,794
Location
Spokane, WA
And, my bad, the lightest pistols reported were 9mm not .22lr. It had been some time since I read the article. You know that's how internet rumors get started!
He retracted the .22lr portion.

Many places handguns aren't allowed, and I can't say I've been more distressed, than where I'm allowed to carry.

Offered a choice I suppose I'd choose a .22lr over nothing. A small firearm you have on you, much better than the one you left in the truck.

Chasing dogs kind of brings that home, a rifle may be preferable to a handgun, but it has to make it to the tree, or where the bear is bayed up. Then having your hands somewhat free to handle the dogs also is a thing.

It's been a fun thread for me, a pretty good distraction, even with the ever present hyperbole, and pontification, that always follows these threads.
 

VLD Pilot

Well-Known Member
Joined
Dec 24, 2017
Messages
2,030
Location
Northern, Mi
He retracted the .22lr portion.

Many places handguns aren't allowed, and I can't say I've been more distressed, than where I'm allowed to carry.

Offered a choice I suppose I'd choose a .22lr over nothing. A small firearm you have on you, much better than the one you left in the truck.

Chasing dogs kind of brings that home, a rifle may be preferable to a handgun, but it has to make it to the tree, or where the bear is bayed up. Then having your hands somewhat free to handle the dogs also is a thing.

It's been a fun thread for me, a pretty good distraction, even with the ever present hyperbole, and pontification, that always follows these threads.
Aside from the 22rf pistols being notorious for feed issues depending on ammo, it's not all that bad of a carry pistol vs the 25 which a surprisingly high number of people carry. I love my Ruger 22 pistol. Heavy barrel camper model is extremely accurate and haven't had any feed issues. Course I don't carry for defense or I'm sure I'd have had some issues.
 

sp6x6

Well-Known Member
Joined
Dec 8, 2009
Messages
4,250
Location
NW MT
Ive put on many miles on my hands and knees looking for big wounded black bear,rarely mine.We had no weapon lest bow as it is difficult to get them threw Canada,to AK.We took about 70 bears over years at camp
 

sp6x6

Well-Known Member
Joined
Dec 8, 2009
Messages
4,250
Location
NW MT
Son and each have same set up rides under hip belt tied down swivel at hip He qualified 6 years expert rifle and pistol Marines I shot on state champ pistol team Mt
 

Attachments

  • 8A796DB0-3A2D-40E7-8A2A-4F8FA4126671.png
    8A796DB0-3A2D-40E7-8A2A-4F8FA4126671.png
    653.1 KB · Views: 35

VLD Pilot

Well-Known Member
Joined
Dec 24, 2017
Messages
2,030
Location
Northern, Mi
Son and each have same set up rides under hip belt tied down swivel at hip He qualified 6 years expert rifle and pistol Marines I shot on state champ pistol team Mt
Awesome hunting with your son. Memories that won't ever fade. My son lost interest a few years ago. Huge downer. Don't take those for granted. Keep making memories with your Boy.
 

VLD Pilot

Well-Known Member
Joined
Dec 24, 2017
Messages
2,030
Location
Northern, Mi
I've got an old Ruger Mark I, .22LR semi-auto pistol.
Thing has proven remarkably reliable. Never a feeding jam that I remember. Looks pretty well used and abused. But keeps on tick'n, narry a problem.
**** sad. I just retrieved my .22 RF pistol from it's hiding place and low and behold, it's a Browning Buckmark. How I thought it was a Ruger, beyond me. Either way, great little pistol. Hell on squirrels. Red dot mounted on top helps a bit. Irons were deadly but pinpointing with the Red dot on a low setting makes for better accuracy.
 

wilkup

Well-Known Member
Joined
Dec 2, 2013
Messages
1,288
Location
Cle Elum, WA
Any opinions on the BFR 500JRH for a bear insurance pistol?
Been eye-balling one of these magnificent thumb busters in that big bore.
 
Last edited:

HARPERC

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 28, 2011
Messages
6,794
Location
Spokane, WA
Any opinions on the BFR 500JRH for a bear insurance pistol?
Been eye-balling one of these magnificent thumb busters in that big bore.
When we read side by side what rifle to choose for bears, and which handguns to choose, I think it's fairly apparent blowing bigger bears out of their socks with a handgun just isn't going to happen.

The age, size, temperament, and motivation of the bear need be factored in.

We think of all out charges as what we will face. There are also predatory attacks, where the bear moves for position just like it does with other prey.

Timothy Treadwell wanted to teach us about bears. He encountered a large boar, underweight, closing on a hibernation he might not survive. Desperation. Read the pilot coming to pick up Treadwell account of the bear still present, stalking him. Still didn't leave when officials returned.

Contrast that bear with the smaller, sleeping bear, stepped on by Phil Shoemaker and party. Bear was close enough to harm folks, but really it sounded to me like, both sides were looking for a way out when it was ended with a 9mm.

@phorwath has spoke of this for many years. What type of attack are you trying to survive?

For me it's more about the characteristics in the handgun, the same as for concealed carry, can it be accessed quickly etc.

I have a Ruger single action Blackhawk, loaded with heavy Buffalo Bore hard cast. I've seen enough bear shot with the magnum version .44 from a rifle etc. I think it will mostly work.

I also think the bigger revolvers get to mostly work. Provide a significant edge for a hunting handgun? I believe so, and edge for an attack? Not so much.
 
Top