Ballistic Turrets

Reloder28

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I have purchased a Swarovski 3-18x44 BT. I am now faced with getting a ballistic turret made. I understand the data requirement for the most part. I am curious how much bearing the altitude/humidity & temperature have if I am limiting my shots to 600 yards maximum?
 
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FearNoWind

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Some things are beyond your control. Temperature, humidity, barometric pressure and altitude will all make a difference so the best you'll be able to do is find an average for the areas you hunt most often and factor in appropriate adjustments for the variables when it's necessary.
Frankly that's why, IMO, ballistic turrets are more hype than they are practical. If I have to factor in the variables when I'm out of the specific environment the turrets are designed for, why would I need ballistic turrets?
 

acourvil

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You would be better off getting MIL or MOA markings on your turrets and running a data card for the cartridge and conditions that you will be hunting in. That way, you can switch ammo, change environment varialbles, etc. and still have turrets calibrated for what you are doing.
 

WildRose

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You would be better off getting MIL or MOA markings on your turrets and running a data card for the cartridge and conditions that you will be hunting in. That way, you can switch ammo, change environment varialbles, etc. and still have turrets calibrated for what you are doing.
Yep. You can also print off labels that have a row in MOA on bottom with hash marks and a row on top with ranges for your favorite round running the averages for your hunting location for those occasions where you need to dial one up in a hurry.

Len advertises one such label here at LRH quite often, I'd post the link but I've never saved it.

You can also simply use a label maker of your own or vinyl tape and a marker.

I'm old school give me a drop/wind chart and an MOA or Mil Dials for longer range and a graduated MOA or Mil reticle for the quick, shorter range shots.
 

Laelkhunter

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I am looking to buy a Swarovski Z5, but can't decide on the BT or the BRH reticle. I understand that the variables you mention all play into the point of impact. The ranch I hunt on in Chama, NM has elevation from 7800 feet to over 9500 feet. The temp can vary from 30 degrees in the AM, to over 60 degrees on the same day while out in the field. I don't know if I should pick an "average" temp and middle altitude for the data.
The previous scope I had was a Zeiss Diavari-C with a simple Plex reticle, and I never had a problem with hitting where I wanted, without adjusting any turrets or using a ranging reticle. Not sure why I want to change ???
 

Reloder28

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Deer Park, Tx
I purchased the 4W reticle. I had no need of an elevation reticle since I have turrets to turn.


I also ran the numbers on a ballistic calculator. Inputting the humidity/temperature/altitude on several various scenarios. Couldn't discern a nickels worth of difference under 600 yards. So, I will do as FearNoWind suggested and just work from averages.
 

WildRose

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I am looking to buy a Swarovski Z5, but can't decide on the BT or the BRH reticle. I understand that the variables you mention all play into the point of impact. The ranch I hunt on in Chama, NM has elevation from 7800 feet to over 9500 feet. The temp can vary from 30 degrees in the AM, to over 60 degrees on the same day while out in the field. I don't know if I should pick an "average" temp and middle altitude for the data.
The previous scope I had was a Zeiss Diavari-C with a simple Plex reticle, and I never had a problem with hitting where I wanted, without adjusting any turrets or using a ranging reticle. Not sure why I want to change ???
I rarely if ever dial anything for a shot under 600yds but if you are going to stretch it out beyond that you're going to need to or else use a graduated reticle with Mil or MOA markings. That will still require you carrying a range card to know your drop.

Simply going with an MOA turret saves a lot of problems since you can draw up drop cards for different elevations and conditions.

Life just gets more complicated beyond 600yds because of the loss of velocity and increased effects of wind on the bullet.
 

Laelkhunter

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Makes sense. That would be the way to go. Is that why most long range shooters choose scopes other than the Swarovskis? I don't believe they even offer a Mil-Dot reticle. I don't see Swarovski mentioned too much here on this Forum. They are surely "up there" in quality, but then again, I don't think their scopes have enough elevation adjustment to do any real long range adjustments, or do they? That is one of the reasons I was looking at the BRH reticle.
 
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phorwath

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Makes sense. That would be the way to go. Is that why most long range shooters choose scopes other than the Swarovskis? I don't believe they even offer a Mil-Dot reticle. I don't see Swarovski mentioned too much here on this Forum. They are surely "up there" in quality, but then again, I don't think their scopes have enough elevation adjustment to do any real long range adjustments, or do they? That is one of the reasons I was looking at the BRH reticle.

If you purchase the BRH reticle and add the aftermarket elevation turret from Micrometer Style Turret for Swarovski Z5 - BRX/BRH Reticle, you can dial up accurately for a distant shot. Add a 20moa rail, and use the hash marks from the BRH reticle, and you can reach out with the correct holdovers even further.
 

acourvil

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The BRH/BRX spacing is half mildot. You can run the data and know what the holdovers reprent, dial with the turrets, or do a combination of both. For my loads, the holdovers take me out to around 800, no dialing required. You can also dial with the turrets, although the range is more limited than with many other scopes.

The Z5 is a great light weight hunting scope, but like any other product, it compromises in some areas to provide benefits in others. Whether it's a good scope for you depends on what your uses and prioroties are.
 

WildRose

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Makes sense. That would be the way to go. Is that why most long range shooters choose scopes other than the Swarovskis? I don't believe they even offer a Mil-Dot reticle. I don't see Swarovski mentioned too much here on this Forum. They are surely "up there" in quality, but then again, I don't think their scopes have enough elevation adjustment to do any real long range adjustments, or do they? That is one of the reasons I was looking at the BRH reticle.
Swaro's are superb quality scopes but the LR market is not one they really reach out to. The suggestions above will help you get where you want to be with the Swarovskis though.

As a rule they target the "Average Hunter" who wants top quality glass but whom never plans to shoot beyond 400m.

There are lots of scopes out there more suited to LR shooting but you certainly cannot beat the quality of a Swarovski scope.
 
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