300 WM Rifle Recommendations

ScopeRKT

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Ive been browsing for a 300 WM rifle primarily for hunting but also the occasional target shooting as well. Doing some research I was turned on to Cooper and the Sako 85. I was looking at the Sako 85 Long Range. But Im wondering if im in the 2k rifle bracket if there are any other brands to be looking into?
 

Creedmoor shooter

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Ive been browsing for a 300 WM rifle primarily for hunting but also the occasional target shooting as well. Doing some research I was turned on to Cooper and the Sako 85. I was looking at the Sako 85 Long Range. But Im wondering if im in the 2k rifle bracket if there are any other brands to be looking into?
Browning x bolt long range hunter mcmillan comes to mind. I've had pretty good luck with browining. Another option is build on a remington 700 action and get a rifle that you can almost guarantee will shoot well and that won't cost you 2k so you can put more money towards glass.
 

Barrelnut

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Sakos 300 Win barrels are 11 twist. That will be a big issue, if you want to shoot heavy for caliber bullets long range, either for target or hunting. Most 30 LR bullets from Berger require a 10 twist min.

Sakos look and handle nice though. Wood stocks are beautiful, their synthetic stocks, not so much.
 

StrutNut

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I have no complaints about my Savage Bear Hunter in 300WM. I am using it for pretty much the same thing you are looking to do.
 

ScopeRKT

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Any recommendations on rifles that use 10" twist?

Currently looking at:

Montana Rifle Company
Cooper
Winchester
Mark V
 

MudRunner2005

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Any recommendations on rifles that use 10" twist?

Currently looking at:

Montana Rifle Company
Cooper
Winchester
The one I posted a link to is a 1:10... It also has a proven track-record of accuracy. It is not a standard Remington 700, it is a model 5R Milspec. It has a 26" heavy 1:10 twist barrel with 5R rifling in it, and it sits in a fully-aluminum bedded HS Precision stock.

The only thing you will need to swap on that rifle is the trigger, and possibly bed the action.
 

ScopeRKT

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The one I posted a link to is a 1:10... It also has a proven track-record of accuracy. It is not a standard Remington 700, it is a model 5R Milspec. It has a 26" heavy 1:10 twist barrel with 5R rifling in it, and it sits in a fully-aluminum bedded HS Precision stock.

The only thing you will need to swap on that rifle is the trigger, and possibly bed the action.
Any bolt upgrades needed. Im new to 700 and just going on what i read online.
 

MudRunner2005

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Any bolt upgrades needed. Im new to 700 and just going on what i read online.
Man, you'll read so much bullish!t online, that you'll start believing a Rem 700 was the worst rifle in the world, that was produced by the devil, designed by hillary clinton, and emits toxic gases that make people commit adultery.

That's sarcasm, of course...But from the way people talk about them, you would think it's a pile of junk. People love to talk crap about the 700 for some reason. My guess is out of jealousy that their favorite brands all copied the same basic design of the 700, and that Remington beat their brand to it. :D

There's a reason the 700 has remained the same since 1962...You just don't mess with perfection. You can improve on it (blueprinting, etc...), but you don't completely change it. Prime example, most custom actions out there are built on a 700 footprint, and accept 700 magazine assembles and use 700 stocks and triggers. :cool:

The 700 is a great rifle, but like anything mass-produced, there is bound to be a few lemons slip through. It happens with EVERY brand. It's happened to me twice...One high-dollar Weatherby, and one 700. You play the game enough, it's bound to happen...Unless you have extremely good luck.
 

aebhunter

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Another vote for a Remington. Sendero or the new 5r Gen2. My experience with both is their accuracy is on par with most custom guns out there, with half the investment. My Sendero routinely shoots sub 1/2 MOA with handloads. I should mention mine is bedded and has a timney trigger as well. One nice thing about the 5r Gen 2 is that it is already threaded. Still have to get a different trigger, the Remington xmark is deplorable.
 

FEENIX

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I have no complaints about my Savage Bear Hunter in 300WM. I am using it for pretty much the same thing you are looking to do.
They simply just shoot out of the box PERIOD, not to mention they are very DIY friendly; here's a stock WSM ...

[ame]https://youtu.be/TVMCBEe0E_4[/ame]
 
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Remington 700 action -$350 or you can buy a used gun for 500ish and sell the barrel and stock.

Bell and Carlson stock- $270. Great value for the money. Same stock as Wby accumark.

Premium barrel-400

Action trued, barrel chambered, fit , crowned etc by gunsmith for several hundred.

That puts you under 2k, probably about 1500 for something that is going to shoot great, you can pick a custom twist and length , add muzzle brake, add jewel or timney trigger, add fluting, cerakoting, etc if you desire.

The majority of your accuracy is in barrel , then stock stiffness and square action come into play some, but for the most part it's about the right load for the right barrel. Buying Kreiger, Lija, Rock, Bartlein, Broughton... they are all going to be better than what you buy off the shelf. For that matter, the B and C stock is better than the majority of factory rifle stocks.

In essence , I think you can do better for cheaper to equal price by building
 

Ragnarnar

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Let me preface this with no disrespect intended, but do you have any LR precision rifle experience with a less powerful chambering? Everyone here is making recommendations without assessing your shooting abilities. A 300WM is a hell of a cartridge to learn on.

I made the mistake of buying a 300WM first thing when I started out, thinking I would be some super sniper/long range deer killer. I would have been much better served by a .308win or 6.5 something while I was learning to shoot.

Practice doesn't make perfect, it makes permanent. I picked up some bad habits on the 300. I had to drop down to a .308 to unlearn them, and that took some time.

Best.
 

FEENIX

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Let me preface this with no disrespect intended, but do you have any LR precision rifle experience with a less powerful chambering? Everyone here is making recommendations without assessing your shooting abilities. A 300WM is a hell of a cartridge to learn on.

I made the mistake of buying a 300WM first thing when I started out, thinking I would be some super sniper/long range deer killer. I would have been much better served by a .308win or 6.5 something while I was learning to shoot.

Practice doesn't make perfect, it makes permanent. I picked up some bad habits on the 300. I had to drop down to a .308 to unlearn them, and that took some time.

Best.
I too mean no disrespect as I share my "own personal experience only" because we all have varying situations, experiences, and capabilities not to mention the mean$ to have a rifle set-up capable of whatever the end-user's take on what an LRH/S is. My introduction to my first .300 WM started with an honest self-assessment. Luckily for me I did not picked up any bad habit and practice, practice, practice made perfect for me at that time.

I have been shooting my first .300 WM for 20+ years before my introduction to muzzle brakes and its benefits in 2003. I'm not recoil sensitive but most of my rifles (including non-magnums) now sports muzzle brakes and suppressor. All 3 of my .300 WMs with muzzle brakes shoots with a felt recoil similar to that of .243s and makes them more pleasant to shoot and allowed more range time; practice, practice, practice ...

A muzzle brake is definitely not for everybody but today's effective muzzle brakes (and there are plenty to choose from and with very reasonable prices) changes an end-user's perspective and options; they not only reduce felt recoil but also the muzzle rise ... being able to spot target on impact is priceless.

Again, I mean no disrespect. Cheers!

Ed
 
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